English, Article edition: Direct Costs in Patients Hospitalised with Community-Acquired Pneumonia After Non-Response to Outpatient Treatment with Macrolide Antibacterials in the US Joseph A. Paladino; Martin H. Adelman; Jerome J. Schentag; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/94875
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Direct Costs in Patients Hospitalised with Community-Acquired Pneumonia After Non-Response to Outpatient Treatment with Macrolide Antibacterials in the US
Author
  • Joseph A. Paladino
  • Martin H. Adelman
  • Jerome J. Schentag
  • Paul B. Iannini
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Introduction: Antibacterial cost-containment programmes emphasise the use of narrow-spectrum generic agents whenever possible. The use of these agents is driven by their lower purchase prices; the consequences of treatment failure are rarely considered. This study was conducted to identify the costs of treating patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae following failure to respond to outpatient treatment with macrolide antibacterials. Methods: A multicentre, retrospective, observational study was performed in patients with CAP due to S. pneumoniae who were admitted to 31 North American hospitals following a lack of response to >=​2 days of outpatient treatment with a macrolide antibacterial. Direct medical costs (year 2004 values) of infection-related hospital resources, including antibacterials (purchase, preparation, dispensing, administration and monitoring), diagnostic tests, therapeutic procedures, treatment of adverse events and therapeutic failures, and hospitalisation per diem (ward, critical care and ventilator days), were analysed. Total hospital costs were then compared with standard diagnosis-related group (DRG) reimbursement. Results: A total of 122 patients were enrolled. Patients were frequently bacteraemic (52%) and infected with macrolide-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae (71%). Initial inpatient antibacterial treatment was not successful in 17 patients (14%) and seven patients (5.7%) died. The mean length of stay was 8.7 days (SD 7) including 1.3 days (SD 2.9) in a critical care unit and 1.4 days (SD 4.4) of mechanical ventilation. The mean cost of hospitalisation was $US12_678 (SD 13_346) but standard DRG reimbursement averaged only $US8_634. Conclusions: Patients who do not respond to outpatient treatment with a macrolide antibacterial and who are subsequently hospitalised with CAP caused by S. pneumoniae are likely to be infected with a non-susceptible strain, are frequently bacteraemic, are at an increased risk for mortality compared with previously published estimates in patients with CAP due to S. pneumoniae, and incur hospital costs that far exceed standard DRG reimbursement for CAP.
  • Community-acquired-pneumonia, Cost-analysis, Macrolides, Resource-use, Streptococcal-infections
  • RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:25:y:2007:i:8:p:677-683
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment