English, Article edition: Cocaine Medications, Cocaine Consumption and Societal Costs William S. Cartwright

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/94797
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Cocaine Medications, Cocaine Consumption and Societal Costs
Author
  • William S. Cartwright
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Objective: To estimate the benefits of reduced cocaine consumption in terms of reduced societal costs resulting from the introduction of a medication for cocaine dependence with a small incremental treatment effect. Study design: Cost-benefit analysis is applied to study the implications of reduced cocaine consumption. A modelling approach extrapolates the magnitude of treatment effects. Methods: Epidemiological data on cocaine use and consumption as well as economic methods of cost-benefit analysis are utilised. Estimates of societal costs associated with heavy users of cocaine, who are most likely addicted and in need of immediate treatment, are developed using 1995 data. Main outcome measures and results: In the first analysis, a postulated 1% reduction in consumption of cocaine among heavy users is examined to approximate a small treatment effect, resulting in a minimal consumption benefit. It is estimated that such a reduction would be valued at $US259 million. The cost-benefit analysis indicated that a cocaine medication with a small treatment effect (10 percentage point increase in abstinence rates) would result in a benefit to cost ratio in the range of 1.58 to 5.79, depending on prescribing behaviour and type of patient. Conclusions: Such estimates of the benefits of these small treatment effects are conservative, and they may be biased downwards since the willingness to pay for such a cocaine medication could far exceed the benefit to cost estimation used in this paper. Nevertheless, the substantial benefits found in this paper indicate how important investment in cocaine medication is for public health policy; costs may be reduced with efficient prescribing behaviour. Market and governmental barriers to the utilisation of a cocaine medication could reduce the benefits and increase costs. Clinical trials, cost-effectiveness studies, and cost-benefit studies must be conducted to establish the actual pattern of benefits and costs that could be obtained for an efficacious and effective cocaine medication.
  • Cocaine, Cost analysis, Pharmacoeconomics, Prescribing, Sodium channel antagonists
  • RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:18:y:2000:i:4:p:405-413
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment