English, Article edition: Management of Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Defining the Role of Subcutaneous Recombinant Interferon-beta-1a (Rebif(R)) Use of a tradename is for product identification purposes only, and does not imply endorsement. Katherine A. Lyseng-Williamson; Greg L. Plosker

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/92819
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Management of Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Defining the Role of Subcutaneous Recombinant Interferon-beta-1a (Rebif(R)) Use of a tradename is for product identification purposes only, and does not imply endorsement.
Author
  • Katherine A. Lyseng-Williamson
  • Greg L. Plosker
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disease of adults that affects over 1 million people worldwide. Relapsing-remitting MS, characterized by acute attacks (relapses) followed by complete or partial remissions, is the most common type of MS at disease onset. Over time, most patients develop secondary-progressive disease. Costs for patients, caregivers, healthcare providers and insurers, and society in general are high because of the progressive disability and long-term care associated with MS. Historically, drug therapy has represented a relatively small component of the overall cost of the disease and indirect costs have accounted for most of the costs. Although not curative, disease-modifying agents are available for first-line use in patients with relapsing-remitting MS; the goals of therapy are to reduce the frequency and severity of relapses and postpone disease progression. All of the disease-modifying agents are associated with high cost-utility ratios. Subcutaneous (SC) interferon-beta-1a (Rebif(R) section 1) is a disease-modifying therapy that demonstrates significant benefits on all outcome measures of clinical trials [relapse rate, relapse severity, progression of disability, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) burden of disease and MRI activity] in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. In a large, 2-year, double-blind trial, SC interferon-beta-1a 44mug three time weekly decreased the number of relapses by 32% and delayed disease progression by 9.4 months with compared with placebo. In addition, patients treated with SC interferon-beta-1a had 78% fewer active lesions than placebo recipients when evaluated by MRI scans. A 2-year extension of this trial demonstrated the persistence of positive effects with treatment. Results from a large, assessor-blinded, randomized trial in patients with relapsing-remitting MS show a significant short-term therapeutic advantage for SC interferon-beta-1a over IM interferon-beta-1a. At week 24 of treatment, 74.9% of patients who received SC interferon-beta-1a 44mug three times weekly were relapse-free compared with 63.3% of those who received intramuscular (IM) interferon-beta-1a 30mug (Avonex(R)) once weekly. Moreover, there were fewer mean active lesions per MRI scan in SC interferon-beta-1a recipients than in IM interferon-beta-1a recipients (0.7 vs 1.3 lesions). The most frequently reported adverse event with SC interferon-beta-1a is injection site inflammation (>60% of patients). SC interferon-beta-1a treatment is associated with the well recognized adverse events which accompany interferon therapy including flu-like syndrome and dose-related effects on elevation of liver enzymes and reduction in white blood cell indices. The reduction in relapses, hospital admissions and courses of corticosteroid therapy seen with SC interferon-beta-1a compared with placebo results in decreased costs within the healthcare system. The delay in disease progression may reduce both direct (e.g. paid caregivers and adaptive equipment) and indirect (e.g. disability payments and lost income) costs and will likely be distributed across multiple healthcare and non-healthcare systems. In conclusion, SC interferon-beta-1a is a valuable first-line disease-modifying therapy in the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of MS. The high acquisition costs of interferon-beta-1a must be weighed against the long-term benefits of therapy.
  • Azathioprine, Glatiramer acetate, Immunoglobulins, Immunomodulators, Interferon beta 1a, Interferons, Mitoxantrone, Multiple sclerosis
  • RePEc:wkh:dmhout:v:10:y:2002:i:5:p:307-325
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment