English, Article edition: Insulin Therapy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Shared Care Versus Secondary Outpatient Care in The Netherlands Raymond C.W. Hutubessy; Hindrik Vondeling; Jeroen J.J. de Sonnaville; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/92747
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Insulin Therapy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Shared Care Versus Secondary Outpatient Care in The Netherlands
Author
  • Raymond C.W. Hutubessy
  • Hindrik Vondeling
  • Jeroen J.J. de Sonnaville
  • Louisa P. Colly
  • Jan L..J. Smit
  • Robert J. Heine
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Objective: To support policy-making for patients with diabetes mellitus we compared the costs and effectiveness of initiation of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in 2 settings in The Netherlands. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: A shared-care setting and an outpatient care setting of a university hospital. Both settings are located in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Patients: All patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus above 40 years of age who were transferred to insulin therapy in 1993 in both settings. Intervention: Initiation and monitoring of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Study perspective: healthcare sector. Main outcome measures: Baseline and 12 months glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values and fasting blood glucose levels, and direct healthcare costs of insulin therapy. Costs were expressed in 1996 Dutch guilders (NLG) [NLG1 =​ 0.5 US dollars ($US)]. Results: In the shared-care setting (n =​ 57) the per patient healthcare costs during 1 year of follow-up averaged NLG2467. In the secondary care setting (n =​ 45) healthcare costs averaged NLG2740. A sensitivity analysis demonstrated that healthcare costs per patient were in the same range in both settings, ranging from NLG2000 to about NLG3400 ($US1000 to $US1700). Mean HbA1c values fell from 9.1 to 7.9% (shared-care setting; p < 0.05) and from 10.2 to 8.2% (secondary care setting; p < 0.05). The percentage of patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c >8.5%) decreased from 56 to 30% (shared-care setting) and from 76 to 36% (secondary care setting). The percentage of patients with good glycemic control (HbA1c <7%) increased from 4 to 23% (shared-care setting) and from 2 to 18% (secondary care setting). Conclusions: The study shows that in the first year of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, acceptable glycemic control (HbA1c <8.5%) can be attained in the majority of patients in both a shared-care and a secondary care setting, at comparable low average costs per patient.
  • Antihyperglycaemics, Cost analysis, Insulin, Pharmacoeconomics, Type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • RePEc:wkh:dmhout:v:9:y:2001:i:6:p:337-344
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment