English, Article edition: Evaluating Disease Management Programs David R. Walker; Byron K. McKinney; Miriam Cannon-Wagner; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/92663
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Evaluating Disease Management Programs
Author
  • David R. Walker
  • Byron K. McKinney
  • Miriam Cannon-Wagner
  • Richard P. Vance
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • The growing burden of chronic illness has contributed to increasing healthcare costs in the past two decades. Disease management can play an important role in reducing the growth in costs while at the same time improving outcomes. It is important that disease management companies accurately measure the financial impact of their program interventions in order to provide evidence that costs are reduced in the participant population because of the interventions. The most satisfactory method for evaluating the impact of disease management programs is a randomized controlled study. Unfortunately, randomized controlled studies can be costly, time-consuming and not morally acceptable for some clients. On the other hand, performing financial evaluations of a program without using a control group can be misleading and result in inefficient use of resources. The next best alternative to a randomized controlled study is to perform a retrospective pre-post control study. The key focus of a retrospective study is identifying a control group that is similar in socioeconomic, clinical and demographic characteristics to the intervention group. It is important not to use patients in the control group who refuse to participate in the program, because of self-selection biases that can be difficult to overcome. In this article, a high-risk coronary artery disease management program is used as an example in designing and implementing a retrospective financial outcomes study. The main hurdle to overcome was identifying a suitably large control group that had characteristics similar to the intervention group. Regression analysis was used to adjust for additional differences between the two groups. The results provide evidence that a retrospective pre-post control study can be a feasible alternative to costly randomized controlled studies. Although not reaching statistical significance at the usual 5% level, which is a limitation likely to be due to the small sample size, the sample study estimated total cost savings to be $US504 per member per month (PMPM). This represents an annualized saving of $US1 016 064 for the 168 members in the intervention group.
  • Disease management programmes, Pharmacoeconomics
  • RePEc:wkh:dmhout:v:10:y:2002:i:10:p:613-619
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment