English, Article edition: Cost Effectiveness of Diabetes Mellitus Management Programs: A Health Plan Perspective Todd Gilmer; Patrick J. OConnor

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/92611
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Cost Effectiveness of Diabetes Mellitus Management Programs: A Health Plan Perspective
Author
  • Todd Gilmer
  • Patrick J. OConnor
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • In this article, we provide a practical and systematic framework to evaluate the cost effectiveness of health plans Research data indicate that cost effectiveness varies by clinical domain. Blood pressure control, use of aspirin, and influenza and pneumococcal immunizations are cost saving in adults with diabetes across a wide range of ages and types of patients. Lipid control is most cost effective between the ages of 45-85 years, while the cost effectiveness of intensified glycemic control declines with age. Cost-effective diabetes management may be organized by primary care clinicians or by case managers working closely with either primary care or subspecialty physicians. Each delivery model has unique advantages and limitations, and there are insufficient data to compare the cost effectiveness of diabetes care across these organizational settings. Improving or enhancing a current model may require substantial investment. However, the resulting changes in the delivery of care may extend the benefits of improved management to other chronic diseases and to preventive care. There is evidence that patient activation, physician behavior change, and care system improvements may improve care, but the cost effectiveness of these strategies is incompletely understood at present. Selection of clinical goals for improvement is likely to have a major impact on cost effectiveness, with maximal return on investment for blood pressure control, aspirin use, immunizations, and smoking cessation. Effective diabetes care can be delivered across a wide range of care settings, including primary care clinics. The organizational characteristics of clinics and use of tools such as patient registries, guidelines, visit planning and active outreach to patients improve care, but returns on investment with regards to these specific strategies awaits further research.
  • Cost-analysis, Diabetes-mellitus, Disease-management-programmes, Patient-education
  • RePEc:wkh:dmhout:v:11:y:2003:i:7:p:439-453
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment