English, Article edition: Validation of the Pneumonia Severity Index Among Patients Treated at Home or in the Hospital Brian S. Armour; Stephen R. Pitts; M. Melinda Pitts; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/92361
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Validation of the Pneumonia Severity Index Among Patients Treated at Home or in the Hospital
Author
  • Brian S. Armour
  • Stephen R. Pitts
  • M. Melinda Pitts
  • Jennifer Wike
  • Linda Alley
  • Jeff Etchason
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Objective: To assess the predictive validity of the pneumonia severity-of-illness index (PSI), a mortality prediction rule, and extend the work of others by including data on outpatients treated for pneumonia. Methods: Prospective study of 675 consecutive patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) [501 inpatients and 174 outpatients] treated at primary care practice clinics or emergency departments at nine medical centers (five community healthcare systems, three university-affiliated hospital systems, and one Veterans Affairs Medical Center) in Georgia and Virginia in the US between November 1996 and March 1998. Data, including demographic characteristics, co-morbid conditions, laboratory and chest x-ray results, were collected from surveys administered to patients at inception, 2, 15, and 30 days and from retrospective medical chart review. We computed the PSI for each patient using demographic and prognostic factors including age, gender, co-existing illnesses, vital signs, laboratory test results and the corresponding logistic regression parameters from previous research. In addition, the Pneumonia Outcomes Research Team (PORT) prediction rule was used to risk adjust patients for mortality severity by disposition. Results: The PSI performed well in its ability to predict mortality for our sample of patients with an area under the Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) of 0.757, significantly different than chance (p < 0.01). Results of the Homser and Lemeshow goodness of fit test also indicated that the PSI was a reasonably good predictor of mortality for our patients. Twenty-eight patients (4.1%) died within the 30-day observation period. Using the PORT prediction rule we found that 27 of the deaths occurred among inpatients (three in class II, five in class III and 19 in class IV). One of these deaths occurred among outpatients (risk class IV). Conclusion: The PSI is a valid predictor of mortality for outpatients and inpatients treated in various community-based settings.
  • Community-acquired-pneumonia, Pneumonia, Risk-factors
  • RePEc:wkh:dmhout:v:11:y:2003:i:9:p:595-601
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment