English, Article edition: Evaluation and Treatment of Depression (Part I): Benefits for Patients, Providers, and Payors Teresa L. Kramer; Christy L. Beaudin; Carol R. Thrush

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/92287
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Evaluation and Treatment of Depression (Part I): Benefits for Patients, Providers, and Payors
Author
  • Teresa L. Kramer
  • Christy L. Beaudin
  • Carol R. Thrush
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Depression is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, contributing to high medical expenditures, poor clinical outcomes, low productivity, and compromised quality of life. Efficacious treatments are available for the treatment of depression across a broad age range (children/​adolescents to elderly). Care management initiatives that include these promising interventions ameliorate the impact of the disorder among patients receiving mental health services in primary care and behavioral healthcare settings. Part I of this two-part article series provides the reader with an overview of issues related to improving the treatment of depression. The approaches used to treat depression and strategies employed to evaluate treatment success are critical. Disease management is one strategy used for improving depression treatment that benefits the consumer and yields positive results for providers and payors. The most effective strategies are those with multiple components, including patient education, coordination of care between primary care and mental health specialists, and ongoing evaluation and feedback. Although the benefits of such interventions are profound in producing improvements in depressive symptoms, social and emotional functioning, and overall satisfaction, there have been few healthcare systems that have successfully integrated such programs into routine care. Despite indirect advantages to providers and payors, the costs of implementing such programs may present a larger barrier to system-wide adoption of disease management for depression. Certainly, the potential for healthcare cost reductions needs to be systematically examined, particularly the extent to which certain patient groups (the most interesting being those with the highest healthcare costs or catastrophic outcomes of their depression) will benefit from disease management programs. Subpopulations (e.g. children, adolescent and older adults) have associated extant barriers that impede progress with implementing disease management support services and programs. Part II provides an overview of quality improvement strategies demonstrated to be effective in improving depression treatment and discusses examples of programs implemented in various care settings.
  • Depression, Disease-management-programmes
  • RePEc:wkh:dmhout:v:13:y:2005:i:5:p:295-306
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment