English, Article edition: The ghost of 0.7 per cent: origins and relevance of the international aid target Michael A. Clemens; Todd J. Moss

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/9061
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The ghost of 0.7 per cent: origins and relevance of the international aid target
Author
  • Michael A. Clemens
  • Todd J. Moss
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the historical origins of the international goal for rich countries to devote 0.7 per cent of gross national income (GNI) to aid, in order to assess its present relevance. Design/​methodology/​approach – The paper reviews all the original documents, interviews decision makers of that era, and uses their same essential method to estimate a new goal with today's data. Findings – First, the target was calculated using a model which, applied to today's data, yields ludicrous results. Second, no government ever agreed in a UN forum to actually reach 0.7 per cent – though many pledged to move toward it. Third, ODA/​GNI per se does not constitute a meaningful metric for the adequacy of aid flows. Research limitations/​implications – Any further work on aid targets must be based on a country-by-country assessment of realistic funding opportunities. Practical implications – The 0.7 per cent goal has no modern academic basis, has failed as a lobbying tool, and should be abandoned. Originality/​value – Anyone who studies or works on the ways that rich countries can assist the development process must confront the 0.7 per cent goal sooner or later. The paper shows for the first time that it arose from an economic model with no modern credibility, and that – contrary to conventional wisdom – none of the UN documents contains a promise to meet the goal.
  • Developing countries, International aid
  • RePEc:eme:ijdipp:v:6:y:2007:i:1:p:3-25
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment