English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: The Broader Benefits of Transportation Infrastructure Ian Sue Wing; William P. Anderson; T.R. Lakshmanan

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/87490
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The Broader Benefits of Transportation Infrastructure
Author
  • Ian Sue Wing
  • William P. Anderson
  • T.R. Lakshmanan
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • Assessments of the economic benefits of transportation infrastructure investments are critical to good policy decisions. At present, most such assessments are based of two types of studies: micro-scale studies in the form of cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and macro-scale studies in the form of national or regional econometric analysis. While the former type takes a partial equilibrium perspective and may therefore miss broader economic benefits, the latter type is too widely focused to provide much guidance concerning specific infrastructure projects or programs. Intermediate (meso-scale) analytical frameworks, which are both specific with respect to the infrastructure improvement in question and comprehensive in terms of the range of economic impacts they represent, are needed. This paper contributes to the development of meso-scale analysis via the specification of a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model that can assess the broad economic impact of improvements in transportation infrastructure networks. The model builds on recent CGE formulations that seek to capture the productivity penalty on firms and the utility penalty on households imposed by congestion (Meyers and Proost, 1997; Conrad, 1997) and others that model congestion via the device of explicit household time budgets (Parry and Bento, 2001, 2002). The centerpiece of our approach is a representation of the process through which markets for non-transport commodities and labor create derived demands for freight, shopping and commuting trips. Congestion, which arises due to a mismatch between the derived demand for trips and infrastructure capacity, is modeled as increased travel time along individual network links. Increased travel time impinges on the time budgets of households and reduces the ability of transportation service firms to provide trips using given levels of inputs. These effects translate into changes in productivity, labor supply, prices and income. A complete algebraic specification of the model is provided, along with details of implementation and a discussion of data resources needed for model calibration and application in policy analysis.
  • RePEc:oec:itfaaa:2007/​10-en
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment