English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Pollution Tax for Controlling Emissions from the Manufacturing and Power Generation Sectors: Metro Manila Catherine Frances J. Corpuz

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/81369
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Pollution Tax for Controlling Emissions from the Manufacturing and Power Generation Sectors: Metro Manila
Author
  • Catherine Frances J. Corpuz
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • Dasgupta and Maler (1991) ruefully observed: "The fact that for such a long while environmental and development economics have had little to say to each other is a reflection of these academic disciplines; it does not at all reflect the world as we should know it." Fortunately for us, environmental concerns are now in the forefront of discussions on economic growth. While the manifestations of environmental abuse would differ depending on the conditions of each country, they are generally of two kinds: (i) those that arise primarily because of poverty and population growth; and, (ii) those that arise from increased industrialization and urbanization leading to the pollution of water, air and soil. The latter is the subject of the current endeavor. In the course of producing (and consuming) commodities, negative or beneficial side effects arise that are borne by the economic agents not directly involved in the production or consumption of the commodities. Broadly defined, an externality is a relevant cost or benefit that individual economic agents fail to consider when making rational decisions. Externalities drive a wedge between private and social costs or benefits and therefore, prevent the attainment of economic efficiency and Pareto efficiency. However, the collective effect of ignoring externalities is socially undesirable. Without any corrective action taken to internalize externalities, resources will not be allocated efficiently, even if the economy is otherwise competitive. Externalities may be internalized by government intervention through different avenues: i) Pigovian taxes or subsidies; ii) through voluntary agreements between individuals involved (e.g., tradable emission permits); and, iii) control of quantities of polluting inputs or outputs that would otherwise prevail in an unregulated market.
  • Pollution tax, Philippines
  • RePEc:eep:report:rr1999081
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment