English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Spatial Localization in Manufacturing: A Cross-Country Analysis Stefania Vitali; Mauro Napoletano; Giorgio Fagiolo

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/75512
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Spatial Localization in Manufacturing: A Cross-Country Analysis
Author
  • Stefania Vitali
  • Mauro Napoletano
  • Giorgio Fagiolo
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • This paper employs a homogenous firms' database to investigate industry localiza- tion in European countries. More specifically, we compare, across industries and countries, the predictions of two of the most popular localization indices, i.e., the Ellison and Glaeser index (Ellison and Glaeser, 1997) and the Duranton and Over- man index (Duranton and Overman, 2005). We find that, independently from the index used, localization is a pervasive phenomenon in all countries studied, but the degree of localization is very uneven across industries in each country. Furthermore, we find that the two indices significantly diverge in predicting the intensity of the forces generating localization within each industry. Finally, we perform a cross- sectoral analysis of localized industries. We show that, in all countries, localized sectors are mainly "traditional" sectors (like jewelery, wine, and textiles) and sec- tors where scale economies are important. However, once one controls for countries' industrial structures science-based sectors turn out to be the most localized ones.
  • RePEc:egu:wpaper:0906
  • This paper employs a homogenous firms database to investigate industry localization in European countries. More specifically, we compare, across industries and countries, the predictions of two of the most popular localization indices, i.e., the Ellison and Glaeser (1997) index and the Duranton and Overman (2005) index. We find that, independently from the index used, localization is a pervasive phenomenon in all countries studied, but the degree of localization is very uneven across industries in each country. Furthermore, we find that the two indices significantly diverge in predicting the intensity of the forces generating localization within each industry. Finally, we perform a cross-sectoral analysis of localized industries. We show that, in all countries, localized sectors are mainly ``traditional'' sectors (like jewelery, wine, and textiles) and sectors where scale economies are important. However, once one controls for countries' industrial structures science-based sectors turn out to be the most localized ones.
  • Industry Localization; Manufacturing Industries; Localization Indices; Spatial Concentration; Spatial correlation; Cross-country studies
  • RePEc:ssa:lemwps:2009/​04
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment