English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Parametric and non-parametric approaches to price and tax reform Angus Deaton; Serena Ng

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/73658
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Parametric and non-parametric approaches to price and tax reform
Author
  • Angus Deaton
  • Serena Ng
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • In the analysis of tax reform, when equity is traded off against efficiency, the measurement of the latter requires us to know how tax- induced price changes affect quantities supplied and demanded. In this paper, we present various econometric procedures for estimating how taxes affect demand. We examine advantages and disadvantages of parametric methods of tax reform analysis and suggest that the nonparametric `average derivate estimator' is a useful alternative. We apply both parametric and nonparametric methods to analyze possible price reform for foods in rural Pakistan, and discuss the issues that remain to be dealt with in empirical welfare analyses.
  • RePEc:nbr:nberwo:5564
  • In many public policy problems, we need to estimate the way in which policy changes affect people's behavior. In the analysis of tax and subsidy reform, which is the topic of this paper, we need to know how tax-induced price changes affect the amounts that people buy of the taxed goods. We present various economic and statistical approaches to obtaining the estimates that are required. We consider the structural methods that are standard in economics, where the behavior and welfare of individual agents are simultaneously captured by the specification of utility functions whose parameters are to be estimated. We argue that these methods are less useful than alternatives that directly consider the derivatives of the regression function of average behavior. We consider both parametric and nonparametric estimators of these derivatives in the context of price reform for foods in Pakistan, focussing on the advantages and disadvantages of "average derivative estimation" (ADE) as proposed by Hardle and Stoker (1989) and Stoker (1991). Average derivative estimation is attractive in principle because it directly estimates the statistics that are required for policy analysis. In the practical case considered here, neither technique is a clear winner; each has strengths and weaknesses.
  • tax policy, consumer behavior, average derivative estimation
  • RePEc:boc:bocoec:376
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment