English, Article edition: From the Sidelines to Center Stage: Sidekick No More? The European Commission in Justice and Home Affairs Ucarer, Emek M.

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/67020
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • From the Sidelines to Center Stage: Sidekick No More? The European Commission in Justice and Home Affairs
Author
  • Ucarer, Emek M.
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Cooperation in Justice and Home Affairs (JHA) – an issue area that includes matters of asylum, immigration, police and judicial cooperation – is a relatively new policy arena for the European Union. The level and quality of the collective thinking on these issues have improved since the mid-1980s. JHA cooperation was formally endorsed in Maastricht and revisited during the 1996 IGC, resulting in new institutional frameworks within which discussions now occur. Throughout this period, the European Commission has seen its involvement in the decision-making enhanced. Its efforts as an actor began with a humble Task Force with which the Commission attempted to steer EU's policies on asylum and immigration, as well as police and judicial cooperation. After Amsterdam, and particularly as a result of the Commission's restructuring following the resignation of the Santer Commission, the Commission's institutional capacities as well as its charge vis-à-vis the treaties has changed quite remarkably. This paper reviews the Commission's role in JHA as an institutional actor and will evaluate its agency and emerging autonomy in these fields. It argues that the Commission has a stronger constitutional and institutional basis from which to work, bolstered by the increased propensity by member states to delegate to the Commission and enhanced by the creation of the Directorate General for Justice and Home Affairs. While improvements in the Commission's position vis-à-vis the immediate aftermath of Maastricht are visible, challenges remain nonetheless which constrain the Commission’s ability to act as a “competence-maximizing” institution with formal agenda-setting powers.
  • agency theory; Amsterdam Treaty; asylum policy; European Commission; Europeanization; harmonisation; immigration policy; institutionalism; leadership; Maastricht Treaty; Schengen; supranationalism; Third Pillar; political science
  • RePEc:erp:eiopxx:p0065
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment