English, Article edition: State Isomorphism in the Post-Socialist Transition Kyvelidis, Ioannis

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/66879
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • State Isomorphism in the Post-Socialist Transition
Author
  • Kyvelidis, Ioannis
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • With the collapse of the communist regimes, the post-socialist countries are facing the problem of building new legal and institutional systems which will adequately address the needs of the markets. They also try to implement new reforms. But the transition towards economic and market reforms across the bloc has been very uneven, producing the countries-winners, countries-laggards, and countries-losers. There have been some attempts to explain that unevenness from the temporal path dependency perspective and from geographic proximity perspective. Can we explain this unevenness better drawing upon the theory of institutional isomorphism? This paper is not ambitious and built exclusively on literature review. It attempts to borrow from some middle-range social theories of institution building and, especially, the theory of institutional isomorphism by DiMaggio and Powell. It shows that some parts of the bloc seem to be surprisingly isomorphic. The paper suggests an explanation of the possible causes and applicability of the phenomenon of isomorphism in the post-Soviet bloc. In particular, it: 1) contrasts the facts of the transformation with the theory of institutional and organizational isomorphism, 2) makes a fair causal comparison with other explanations, 3) claims the adequate causal depth for the explanation, 4) points at an adequate causal mechanism of the transformation.
  • institutional isomorphism theory; legitimacy; enlargement; East-Central Europe; sociology
  • RePEc:erp:eiopxx:p0045
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment