English, Article edition: Short-time Employment Dominates Labour Market in Austria Christine Mayrhuber; Thomas Url

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/64293
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Short-time Employment Dominates Labour Market in Austria
Author
  • Christine Mayrhuber
  • Thomas Url
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • The analysis brought to light unexpectedly short employment periods in the Austrian labour market: on average, an employment terminated in 1997 had been effective for just 1.8 years. Unsurprisingly, average employment was very short in the sectors with traditional seasonal employment. What came as a surprise, however, was the fact that employment periods in the expanding services industries (company-related services, data processing, etc.) were also markedly below the overall average. The retail business is similarly characterised by short employment spells. The "longest" – albeit still very short – employment periods can be found in those sectors whose institutional framework provides for some degree of job security: here the list is topped by the insurance industry, where employment periods were 4.9 years on average, closely followed by energy and water utility industries and the credit sector. Short employment periods are, however, not limited to construction and tourism, the traditional sectors with seasonal employment. Rather, strong signs were found of labour market segmentation across all economic sectors. Taking the duration of employment as a yardstick, at least two segments, and thus at least two groups of employees, can be distinguished in the Austrian labour market: on the one hand, the stable primary labour market segment, with average employment periods of 12.4 years; on the other hand an uncertain secondary labour market with average employment periods of 2.6 years. Within the latter, a special group is made up by seasonal workers whose average employment spell is just 4 months. The segmentation of the Austrian labour market applies equally for women and men: both work short periods in seasonal jobs. In the secondary segment, women are employed slightly longer than men, at 2.7 and 2.5 years, respectively. In the secure segment, men enjoy a slight advantage over women, at 12.6 and 12.1 years, respectively. In view of these very short employment periods, an even greater increase in labour mobility through economic and social policy measures would run counter to efforts of efficiency. Mobility in terms of time spend on the same job is governed by the production process. Efficient production requires a certain pool of company-specific human resources, i.e., job-linked qualifications. Greater mobility would reduce the productivity of a company and it would mean constant training of new workers. For companies, greater mobility would thus mean greater costs from fluctuation and hencea decline in productivity.
  • Kurze Beschäftigungsdauer dominiert den österreichischen Arbeitsmarkt; Short-time Employment Dominates Labour Market in Austria
  • RePEc:wfo:monber:y:1999:i:10:p:693-703
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment