English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Genetically modified food and international trade: The case of India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, and the Philippines Gruere, Guillaume; Bouet, Antoine; Mevel, Simon

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/61689
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Genetically modified food and international trade: The case of India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, and the Philippines
Author
  • Gruere, Guillaume
  • Bouet, Antoine
  • Mevel, Simon
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • RePEc:ags:aaea07:9917
  • Replaced with revised version of paper 07/​27/​07.
  • International Relations/​Trade, Research and Development/​Tech Change/​Emerging Technologies,
  • RePEc:ags:aaea07:26251
  • "Genetically modified (GM) food crops have the potential to raise agricultural productivity in Asian countries, but they are also associated with the risk of market access losses in sensitive importing countries. We study the potential effects of introducing GM food crops in Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, and the Philippines in the presence of trade-related regulations of GM food in major importers. We focus on GM field crops (rice, wheat, maize, soybeans, and cotton) resistant to biotic and abiotic stresses, such as drought-resistant rice, and use a multi-country, multi-sector computable general equilibrium model. We build on previous international simulation models by improving the representation of the productivity shocks associated with GM crops, and by using an improved representation of the world market, accounting for the effects of GM food labeling policies in major importers and the possibility of segregation for non-GM products going toward sensitive importing countries. The results of our simulations first show that the gains associated with the adoption of GM food crops largely exceed any type of potential trade losses these countries may incur. Adopting GM crops also allows net importing countries to greatly reduce their imports. Overall, we find that GM rice is bound to be the most advantageous crop for the four countries. Second, we find that segregation of non-GM crops can help reduce any potential trade loss for GM adopters, such as India, that want to keep export opportunities in sensitive countries, even with a 5 percent segregation cost. Lastly, we find that the opportunity cost of segregation is much larger for sensitive importing countries than for countries adopting new GM crops, which suggests that sensitive importers will have the incentive to invest in separate non-GM marketing channels if exporting countries like India decide to adopt GM food crops." from Authors' Abstract
  • Genetically modified food, International trade, Developing countries, Segregation,
  • RePEc:fpr:ifprid:740
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment