Measuring food security using household expenditure surveys: Smith, Lisa C.; Subandoro, Ali

User activity

Share to:
View the summary of this work
Authors
Smith, Lisa C. ; Subandoro, Ali
Subjects
food supply; household surveys; diet
Contents
  • Machine derived contents note: Contents
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • 1. Introduction 1
  • 2. HES Indicators of Food Security 5
  • 2.1 Measuring Indicators of Diet Quantity, Diet Quality and Economic Vulnerability 5
  • 2.2 Measurement Issues to Keep in Mind 8
  • 3. Collecting the Food Data From Households 13
  • 3.1 Strategies for Collecting Data on Quantities of Foods Acquired 13
  • 3.1.1 Foods acquired for in-home consumption 13
  • 3.1.2 Foods consumed out of the home 23
  • 3.2 Other Choices in Questionnaire Design 24
  • 3.2.1 Foods acquired or foods consumed? 24
  • 3.2.2 Which foods? 26
  • 3.2.3 Diary or interview? 28
  • 3.2.4 Recall and reference periods 28
  • 3.2.5 Collecting data on food expenditures 30
  • 3.3 Drafting the Questionnaire 31
  • 3.3.1 Organization and wording of the questionnaire 31
  • 3.3.2 Leading statement 33
  • 3.3.3 Filters, skip codes, and block outs 33
  • 3.3.4 Response codes 35
  • 3.4 Conducting the Interviews: Some Practical Points 35
  • 3.5 Model Household Questionnaire 36
  • 4. Gathering Data for Calculating Metric Weights of Foods and Their Energy Content 45
  • 4.1 Metric Weights of Foods Measured in Nonstandard Units 45
  • 4.1.1 Units of measure with fixed size 45
  • 4.1.2 Units of measure with variable size 46
  • 4.2 Metric Weights of Foods Measured in Volumetric Units, Linear Dimensions, and
  • Using Food Models 47
  • 4.3 Proportionate Weights of Ingredients in Prepared Dishes Consumed Out of the
  • Home 48
  • 4.4 Metric Food Prices 49
  • 4.4.1 Market price surveys
  • 4.4.2 Price opinions
  • 4.4.3 Price estimations from unit values
  • 4.5 Primary Equivalents of Processed Foods 53
  • 4.6 Energy Content of Foods and Edible Portions 54
  • 5. Processing and Cleaning the Data 57
  • 5.1 Assembling the Raw Data Collected from Households and Initial Data Cleaning 57
  • 5.2 Processing and Cleaning Metric Conversion Factors, Metric Prices, and
  • Proportionate Weights of Ingredients in Prepared Dishes 60
  • 5.2.1 Metric conversion factors 60
  • 5.2.2 Metric prices 61
  • 5.2.3 Metric prices of prepared dishes and proportionate weights of their
  • ingredients 63
  • 5.3 Calculating the Number of Household Members, Adult Equivalents, and Energy
  • Requirements 65
  • 5.3.1 Number of household members and adult equivalents 65
  • 5.3.2 Household energy requirements 66
  • 5.4 Calculating and Cleaning Daily Household Metric Food Quantities 66
  • 5.4.1 Calculating metric quantities from the raw food data 66
  • 5.4.2 Cleaning the metric food quantities 69
  • 5.4.2.1 Unit value cleaning 69
  • 5.4.2.2 Cleaning of per adult equivalent quantities 70
  • 5.4.3 Estimating metric quantities to replace missing values 70
  • 5.4.4 Calculating total daily quantities of foods acquired 71
  • 5.5 Calculating Daily Household Total Food Expenditures 71
  • 5.5.1 Estimating expenditures to replace missing values 71
  • 5.5.2 Calculating total daily food expenditures 72
  • 5.6 Calculating and Cleaning Daily Household Energy Acquisition 72
  • 6. Calculating the indicators 76
  • 6.1 Daily Food Energy Consumption per Capita 76
  • 6.2 Percent of Households or People That Are Food Energy Deficient 76
  • 6.3 Diet Diversity 77
  • 6.4 Percent of Food Energy from Staples 78
  • 6.5 Daily Quantities Consumed of Specific Foods per Capita 79
  • 6.6 Percent of Expenditures on Food 80
  • 7. Using the indicators for food security analysis 81
  • 7.1 Where are the food insecure?: Example from Senegal 83
  • 7.2 What is the nature of the food insecurity problem?: Example from Lao PDR 88
  • 7.3 How does food insecurity change over time?: Example from Bangladesh 90
  • 7.4 What are the causes of food insecurity?: Example from Uganda 93
  • 7.5 Which are the most important foods in the diet of different socio-demographic
  • groups? : Example from Tanzania 97
  • Appendix 1. Food Groups with Listing of Most Common Foods 100
  • Appendix 2. Cup Weights of Commonly Consumed Foods 102
  • Appendix 3. Specific Gravities of Commonly Consumed Beverages and Other Liquid
  • Foods 104
  • Appendix 4. Edible Percents of Commonly Consumed Foods 106
  • Appendix 5. STATA 8.0 Program for Calculating of the Number of Household Adult
  • Equivalents and Household Energy Requirements 112
  • Appendix 6. STATA 8.0 Program for Estimating Metric Food Quantities to Replace
  • Missing Values 116
  • Appendix 7. STATA 8.0 Program for Calculating and Cleaning Household Daily Energy
  • Acquisition 120
  • Appendix 8. The Price-Per-Calorie Method of Estimating the Energy Content of Foods
  • Consumed Outside of the Home 122
  • Appendix 9. Local Units of Measure Used in 20 National Household Expenditure
  • Surveys 124
  • Appendix 10. Divergence of market prices from unit values for 12 foods, Papua New
  • Guinea Household Survey 1995/96: Comparison of Gibson/Rozelle and
  • AFINS project results 138
  • References 139.
Bookmark
http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/57782
Work ID
57782

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this work

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this work

Add a comment


Show comments and reviews from Amazon users