English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Optimal Job Design and Career Dynamics in the Presence of Uncertainty Elena Pastorino

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/57375
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Optimal Job Design and Career Dynamics in the Presence of Uncertainty
Author
  • Elena Pastorino
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • This paper investigates a learning model in which information about a worker's ability, unobserved to both the worker and the firm, can be acquired in any period by both parties by observing the worker's performance at a given task. Tasks are differentially informative about productivity: more profitable tasks generate noisier signals of a worker's ability. We characterize the (essentially unique) optimal retention, task assignment and promotion policy for the class of sequential equilibria of this game, by showing that the equilibria of interest are strategically equivalent to the solution of an experimentation problem, a discounted multi-armed bandit with independent and dependent arms. These equilibria are all ex ante efficient but involve ex post inefficient task allocation and separation. In particular, a firm benefits from assigning jobs at which a worker has a comparative disadvantage early in his career, in order to improve on the accuracy of the inference process about ability. While eventually a retained worker can only be assigned the most profitable task, the ex post inefficiency of separations persists even as the time horizon becomes arbitrarily large. In addition, when the ability endowment consists of multiple skills and ability is task specific, low performing promoted workers are fired rather than demoted, if a higher level job, compared to a lower level job, provides a less precise measure of the specific dimension of ability it requires. We then examine the strategic effects of the dynamics of learning on a worker's career profile. We prove that price competition among firms does not alter the ex ante efficiency of turnover and of each firm's assignment strategies, independently of the degree of transferability of human capital. Finally, we show that our results are consistent with stylized properties of hierarchies and promotion systems inside firms
  • Job Assignment, Learning, Experimentation, Correlated Multi-armed Bandit
  • RePEc:red:sed004:234
  • The paper studies a learning model in which information about a worker's ability can be acquired symmetrically by the worker and a firm in any period by observing the worker's performance on a given task. Productivity at different tasks is assumed to be differentially sensitive to a worker's intrinsic talent: potentially more profitable tasks entail the risk of greater output destruction if the worker assigned to them is not of the ability required. We characterize the (essentially unique) optimal retention, task assignment and promotion policy for the class of sequential equilibria of this game, by showing that the equilibria of interest are strategically equivalent to the solution of an experimentation problem (a discounted multi-armed bandit with independent and dependent arms). These equilibria are all ex ante efficient but involve ex post inefficient task allocation and separation. While the ex post inefficiency of separations persists even as the time horizon becomes arbitrarily large, in the limit task assignment is efficient. When ability consists of multiple skills, low performing promoted workers are fired rather than demoted, if outcomes at lower level tasks, compared to those at higher level tasks, provide a sufficiently accurate measure of ability. We then examine the strategic effects of the dynamics of learning on a worker's career profile. We prove, in particular, that price competition among firms causes ex ante inefficient turnover and task assignment, independently of the degree of transferability of human capital. In a class of equilibria of interest it generates a wage dynamics consistent with properties observed in the data
  • Learning, Job Assignment, Experimentation, Correlated Multi-armed Bandit
  • RePEc:ecm:nasm04:292
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment