English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Learning your Earning: Are Labor Income Shocks Really That Persistent? Fatih Guvenen

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/57335
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Learning your Earning: Are Labor Income Shocks Really That Persistent?
Author
  • Fatih Guvenen
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • In this paper we examine the risk situation facing individuals in the labor market. The current consensus in the literature is that the labor income process has a large random walk component. We argue two points. First, the direct estimates of this parameter (from labor income data) appear to be upward biased due to the omission of heterogeneity in income profiles across the population that would be implied, for example, by a human capital model with heterogeneity. When we allow for differences in profiles, the estimated persistence falls from 0.99 to about 0.8. Moreover, the main evidence against profile heterogeneity in the existing literature---that the autocorrelations of income changes are small and typically negative---is in fact also replicated by the profile heterogeneity model we estimate, casting doubt on the previous interpretation of this evidence. Second, we embed this process in a life-cycle model to examine how it alters the consumption-saving decision of individuals. We assume that---as seems plausible---individuals do not know their profiles exactly at the beginning of life, but learn in a Bayesian way with successive income observations. We find that learning is very slow and affects consumption choice throughout the life-cycle. The model generates substantial rise in consumption inequality over the life-cycle, which matches empirical observations (Deaton and Paxson 1994). Moreover, the shape of the age-inequality profile is non-concave as in the data, but unlike in a model with very persistent shocks. Finally, the consumption profiles of college graduates are steeper than high-school graduates in the model consistent with the data because they face a wider dispersion of, and hence uncertainty about, income growth rates. Overall this evidence indicates that income shocks may be significantly less persistent than what is currently assumed.
  • earnings process, idiosyncratic shocks; learning; inequality
  • RePEc:red:sed004:177
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment