English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: What Social Security: Beveridgean or Bismarckian? J. Ignacio Conde-Ruiz; Paola Profeta

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/57215
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • What Social Security: Beveridgean or Bismarckian?
Author
  • J. Ignacio Conde-Ruiz
  • Paola Profeta
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • Bismarckian social security systems are associated with larger public pension expenditures, a smaller fraction of private pension and lower income inequality than Beveridgean systems. This paper introduces a bidimensional voting model to account for all these features. Agents differ in age, income and their ability to invest in capital market. The voting game determines the degree of redistribution of the social security system - Bismarckian or Beveridgean- and the size of the transfer. In an economy with three income groups, a small Beveridgean system is supported by low-income agents, who gain from its redistributive feature, and high-income individuals, who seek to minimize their tax contribution and invest their resources in a private scheme. Middle-income individuals instead favor a large earning-related system. Hence, large (small) inequality is associated with a small Beveridgean (large Bismarckian) system and a large (small) private system
  • Pension systems across European countries, redistribution, political economy and bidimensional voting games
  • RePEc:red:sed004:317
  • Why are Bismarckian social security systems associated with larger public pension expenditures, a smaller fraction of private pension and lower income in-equality than Beveridgean systems? These facts are puzzling for political economy theories of social security which predict that Beveridgean systems, involving intra-generational redistribution, should enjoy larger support among low-income people and thus be larger. This paper explains these features in a bidimensional political economy model. In an economy with three income groups, low-income support a large, redistributive system; middle-income favor an earning-related system, while high-income oppose any public system, since they have access to a superior saving technology, a private system. We show that, if income inequality is large, the voting majority of high-income and low-income supports a (small) Beveridgean system, and a large private pillar arises; the opposite occurs with low inequality. Additionally, when the capital market provides higher returns, a Beveridgean system is more likely to emerge.
  • Political economy, public versus private social security, pensions system across european countries, income inequality, structure-induced equilibrium
  • RePEc:upf:upfgen:633
  • Bismarckian social security systems are associated with larger public pension expenditures, a smaller fraction of private pension and lower income inequality than Beveridgean systems. This paper introduces a bidimensional voting model to account for all these features. Agents differ in age, income and in their ability to invest in the capital market. The voting game determines the degree of redistribution of the social security system -Bismarckian or Beveridgean- and the size of the transfer (for the low-income retirees). In an economy with three income groups, a small Beveridgean system is supported by low-income agents, who gain from its redistributive feature, and high-income individuals, who seek to minimize their tax contribution and to invest their resources in a private scheme. Middle- income individuals favor a large earning-related (Bismarckian) system. Hence, large (small) inequality is associated with a small Beveridgean (large Bismarckian) system and a large (small) private system.
  • RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2003-16
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment