English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Gender Discrimination Estimation in a Search Model with Matching and Bargaining Luca Flabbi

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/57110
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Gender Discrimination Estimation in a Search Model with Matching and Bargaining
Author
  • Luca Flabbi
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • Gender wage differentials, conditional on observed productivity characteristics, have been considered a possible indication of prejudice against women in the labor market. However, there is no conclusive evidence on whether these differentials are due to labor market discrimination or to unobserved productivity differences. The objective of this paper is to propose a solution for this identification problem by developing and estimating a search model of the labor market with matching, bargaining and employers’ taste discrimination. In equilibrium all types of employers wage discriminate women: prejudiced employers because of preference and unprejudiced employers because of spillover effects that worsen the bargaining position of women. Estimation is performed by maximum likelihood on Current Population Survey data for the year 1995. Results indicate that the productivity of women is 6.5% lower than the productivity of men and that about half of the employers are prejudiced against women. Three policy experiments are implemented using the estimated parameters: an equal pay policy, an affirmative action policy and a wage differential decomposition that takes into account equilibrium effects.
  • gender differentials, discrimination, search models, maximum likelihood estimation, structural estimation, affirmative action
  • RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1764
  • Gender wage differentials, conditional on observed productivity characteristics, have been considered a possible indication of prejudice against women in the labor market. However, there is no conclusive evidence on whether these differentials are due to labor market discrimination or to unobserved productivity differences. The objective of this paper is to solve the identification problem by developing a search model of the labor market with matching, bargaining and employer's taste discrimination. In equilibrium all types of employers wage discriminate women: prejudiced employers because of preference and unprejudiced employers because of spillover effects that worsen the bargaining position of women. Estimation is performed by maximum likelihood on Current Population Survey data for the year 1995. Results indicate that the productivity of women is 6.5% lower than the productivity of men and that about half of the employers are prejudiced against women. Two policy experiments are implemented using the estimated parameters: an equal pay policy and an affirmative action policy.Classification-JEL:C73,D72, D74
  • RePEc:geo:guwopa:gueconwpa~04-04-08
  • Discrimination; Search Models; Maximum Likelihood Estimation
  • RePEc:red:sed004:367
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment