English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: An Anatomy of International Trade: Evidence from French Firms Francis Kramarz; Jonathan Eaton; Samuel Kortum

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/56977
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • An Anatomy of International Trade: Evidence from French Firms
Author
  • Francis Kramarz
  • Jonathan Eaton
  • Samuel Kortum
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • We examine the sales of French manufacturing firms in 113 destinations, including France itself. Several regularities stand out: (1) the number of French firms selling to a market, relative to French market share, increases systematically with market size; (2) sales distributions are very similar across markets of very different size and extent of French participation; (3) average sales in France rise very systematically with selling to less popular markets and to more markets. We adopt a model of firm heterogeneity and export participation which we estimate to match moments of the French data using the method of simulated moments. The results imply that nearly half the variation across firms that we see in market entry can be attributed to a single dimension of underlying firm heterogeneity, efficiency. Conditional on entry, underlying efficiency accounts for a much smaller variation in sales in any given market. Parameter estimates imply that fixed costs eat up a little more than half of gross profits. We use our results to simulate the effects of a counterfactual decline in bilateral trade barriers on French firms. While total French sales rise by around US$16 billion, sales by the top decile of firms rise by nearly US$23 billion. Every lower decile experiences a drop in sales, due to selling less at home or exiting altogether.
  • RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14610
  • Data on the individual export destinations of French firms shed light on the nature of entry barriers to national markets. The data reveal some striking regularities: (1) Looking across des tinations, the relationship between market size, French market share, and the number of French firms selling there is very tight, with the number of participants rising almost in proportion with respect to market share and with an elasticity of about two-thirds with respect to market size. (2) Looking across firms, most exporters sell to very few markets while a small number sell almost everywhere. Firms that export more widely sell much more within France and have higher value-added per worker. We show that a simple Ricardian model of export behavior with Cournot competition and a fixed cost of entry, calibrated to data on trade shares around the world, can explain these features. A relatively low fixed cost implies a di¤erence in the number of goods supplied to the largest and smallest markets of a factor of nearly 500. But with our assumption about the elasticity of substitution across commodities and our model's implication that lowest cost suppliers are verrepresented in the smallest markets, the implied welfare advantage is only 1.5
  • Firm Level Trade
  • RePEc:red:sed004:802
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment