English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Multinationals and the Canadian Innovation Process Baldwin, John R.; Hanel, Peter

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/56014
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Multinationals and the Canadian Innovation Process
Author
  • Baldwin, John R.
  • Hanel, Peter
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • This paper examines whether new views of the multinational that see these firms as decentralizing research and development (R&​D) activities abroad to exploit local competencies accord with the activities of multinationals in Canada. The paper describes the innovation regime of multinational firms in Canada by examining the differences between foreign- and domestically owned firms. It focuses on the extent to which R&​D is used; the type of R&​D activity; the importance of R&​D relative to other sources of innovative ideas; whether the use of these other ideas indicates that multinationals are closely tied into local innovation networks; the intensity of innovation; and the use that is made of intellectual property rights to protect innovations from being copied by others.We find that, far from being passively dependent on R&​D from their parents, foreign-owned firms in Canada are more active in R&​D than the population of Canadian-owned firms. They are also more often involved in R&​D collaboration projects both abroad and in Canada. As expected, foreign subsidiaries enjoy the advantage of accessing technology from their parent and sister companies. While multinationals are more closely tied into a network of related firms for innovative ideas than are domestically owned firms, their local R&​D unit is a more important source of information for innovation than are these inter-firm links. Surprisingly, foreign subsidiaries also more frequently report that they are using technology from unrelated firms. Moreover, the multinational is just as likely to develop links into a local university and other local innovation consortia as are domestically owned firms. This evidence indicates that multinationals in Canada are not, on the whole, operating subsidiaries whose scientific development capabilities are truncated - at least not in comparison to domestically owned firms. A comparison of the extent and impact of innovation activity of domesti
  • Business performance and ownership, Science and technology, Business ownership, Innovation
  • RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2000151e
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment