English, Article edition: Work in utopia: Pro-work sentiments in the writings of four critics of classical economics David Spencer

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/51078
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Work in utopia: Pro-work sentiments in the writings of four critics of classical economics
Author
  • David Spencer
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • The paper examines the pro-work doctrines of four writers who were connected with the 'utopian' and 'romantic' critique of classical economics in the nineteenth century. These authors are Charles Fourier, Thomas Carlyle, John Ruskin, and William Morris. All four argued that the problem of work aversion stemmed from the existing institutions of capitalist society, and could be overcome by the creation of an alternative system of production. Their aim was to create a future society in which work could be experienced as a positive activity. The paper argues that the views of the aforementioned authors provided an important counterchallenge to the classical economists' conception of work as a disutility.
  • Work, utopia, Charles Fourier, Thomas Carlyle, John Ruskin, William Morris,
  • RePEc:taf:eujhet:v:16:y:2009:i:1:p:97-122
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment