English, Article edition: Technological Change and Returns to Education: The Implications for the S&E Labor Market Jin Hwa Jung; Kang-Shik Choi

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/49544
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Technological Change and Returns to Education: The Implications for the S&​E Labor Market
Author
  • Jin Hwa Jung
  • Kang-Shik Choi
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • This paper analyzes the earnings effect of skill-biased technological change (SBTC), focusing on the comparison of science and engineering (S&​E) and non-S&​E occupations. In the analysis, we assert that S&​E occupations and non-S&​E occupations differ in the nature of skill requirements and their susceptibility to technological change; and consequently the earnings effects of SBTC also demonstrate a similar impact. For the empirical analysis, the modified Mincerian earnings equations are estimated by quantile regressions as well as the ordinary least squares (OLS) and two-stage estimation method. Fitted to Korean panel data, the earning-enhancing effect of SBTC is observed for male workers, not only for those in S&​E occupations but also for those in non-S&​E occupations. Such an effect is not observed for women in S&​E occupations, and rather turns even negative for women in non-S&​E occupations; envisaging a relatively large occurrence of work interruption of married women in Korea, we conjecture that this may reflect women workers' skill deterioration taking place during a work interruption. The earnings effect of SBTC is most apparent for male workers in the higher quantiles of earnings distribution, implying that those who are highly educated and have high unobserved ability gain most from SBTC.
  • Skill-biased technological change, returns to education, S&​E labor market, quantile regression,
  • RePEc:taf:glecrv:v:38:y:2009:i:2:p:161-184
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment