English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: POSTCOLONIAL IRELAND AND ZIMBABWE: STAGNATION BEFORE CONVERGENCE This paper discusses the slow and hesitant integration of two post-colonial economies into the global economy. One is Ireland, whose independence began in 1921, but which only found its place securely at the productive frontier by the 1990s, with many setbacks on the way. The other is Zimbabwe, which ceased being a colony in 1965 but achieved proper independence only in 1980. Following independence, Zimbabwe’s economic performance in an increasingly globalized world was, like that of Ireland at first, hesitant and disappointing, even before its catastrophic decline in the past decade. Zimbabwe – now reckoned one of the poorest countries in the world – seems to have stumbled through a series of disastrous economic policy errors. Yet the struggles in Zimbabwe over land ownership and the errors in trade policy, fiscal discipline and even financial policy have parallels, more or less close, with the longer and ultimately more successful history of Irish independence. Frank Barry; Patrick Honohan and Tara McIndoe; Trinity College Dublin

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/4771
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • POSTCOLONIAL IRELAND AND ZIMBABWE: STAGNATION BEFORE CONVERGENCE This paper discusses the slow and hesitant integration of two post-colonial economies into the global economy. One is Ireland, whose independence began in 1921, but which only found its place securely at the productive frontier by the 1990s, with many setbacks on the way. The other is Zimbabwe, which ceased being a colony in 1965 but achieved proper independence only in 1980. Following independence, Zimbabwe’s economic performance in an increasingly globalized world was, like that of Ireland at first, hesitant and disappointing, even before its catastrophic decline in the past decade. Zimbabwe – now reckoned one of the poorest countries in the world – seems to have stumbled through a series of disastrous economic policy errors. Yet the struggles in Zimbabwe over land ownership and the errors in trade policy, fiscal discipline and even financial policy have parallels, more or less close, with the longer and ultimately more successful history of Irish independence.
Author
  • Frank Barry
  • Patrick Honohan and Tara McIndoe
  • Trinity College Dublin
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • RePEc:iis:dispap:iiisdp291
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment