2008, English, Article, Report edition: Are computers good for children? The effects of home computers on educational outcomes Daniel O. Beltran; Kuntal K. Das; Robert W. Fairlie

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/193071923
Physical Description
  • Report
Published
  • Centre for Economic Policy Research, 2008-03-27 00:00:00
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Are computers good for children? The effects of home computers on educational outcomes
Author
  • Daniel O. Beltran
  • Kuntal K. Das
  • Robert W. Fairlie
Published
  • Centre for Economic Policy Research, 2008-03-27 00:00:00
Physical Description
  • Report
Subjects
Date or Place
  • Australia
Summary
  • This report explores the causal relationship between computer ownership and high school graduation and other educational outcomes. Teenagers who have access to home computers are 6 to 8 percentage points more likely to graduate from high school than teenagers who do not have home computers after controlling for individual, parental, and family characteristics. Although computers are universal in the classroom, nearly twenty million children in the United States do not have computers in their homes. Surprisingly, only a few previous studies explore the role of home computers in the educational process. Home computers might be very useful for completing school assignments, but they might also represent a distraction for teenagers. This report uses several identification strategies and panel data from the two main U.S. datasets that include recent information on computer ownership among children ? the 2000-2003 CPS Computer and Internet Use Supplements (CIUS) matched to the CPS Basic Monthly Files and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 ? to explore the causal relationship between computer ownership and high school graduation and other educational outcomes. Teenagers who have access to home computers are 6 to 8 percentage points more likely to graduate from high school than teenagers who do not have home computers after controlling for individual, parental, and family characteristics. The study generally finds evidence of positive relationships between home computers and educational outcomes using several identification strategies, including controlling for typically unobservable home environment and extracurricular activities in the NLSY97, fixed effects models, instrumental variables, and including future computer ownership and falsification tests. Home computers may increase high school graduation by reducing non-productive activities, such as truancy and crime, among children in addition to making it easier to complete school assignments.
Language
  • English
Identifier
  • oai:apo.org.au:15520

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • VIC (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in All:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Australian Policy Online. Open to the public Article; Report English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

This single location in Victoria:

Library Access Call number(s) Formats held Language
Australian Policy Online. Open to the public Article; Report English
Show 0 more libraries...
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment