Economic Voting and Electoral Behaviour: How do Individual, Local and National Factors Affect the Partisan Choice? Andrew Leigh

User activity

Share to:
View the summary of this work
Author
Andrew Leigh
Subjects
Elections; Economics
Summary
Using post-election surveys of 14,000 voters in ten Australian elections between 1966 and 2001, Andrew Leigh explores the impact that individual, local and national factors have on voters' decisions. In these ten elections, the poor, foreign-born, younger voters, voters born since 1950, men, and those who are unmarried are more likely to be left-wing. Over the past 35 years, the partisan gap between men and women has closed, but the partisan gap has widened on three dimensions: between young and old; between rich and poor; and between native-born and foreign-born. At a neighbourhood level, he finds that, controlling for a respondent's own characteristics, and instrumenting for neighbourhood characteristics, voters who live in richer neighbourhoods are more likely to be right-wing, while those in more ethnically diverse or unequal neighbourhoods are more likely to be left-wing. Controlling for incumbency, macroeconomic factors do not seem to affect partisan preferences - Australian voters apparently regard both major parties as equally capable of governing in booms and busts.
Bookmark
http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/45083
Work ID
45083

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this work

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this work

Add a comment


Show comments and reviews from Amazon users