English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain Marco Manacorda; Alan Manning; Jonathan Wadsworth

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/48087
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain
Author
  • Marco Manacorda
  • Alan Manning
  • Jonathan Wadsworth
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • RePEc:iza:izadps:dp2352
  • Immigration to the UK has risen over time. Existing studies of the impact of immigration on the wages of native-born workers in the UK have failed to find any significant effect. This is something of a puzzle since Card and Lemieux, (2001) have shown that changes in the relative supply of educated natives do seem to have measurable effects on the wage structure. This paper offers a resolution of this puzzle – natives and immigrants are imperfect substitutes, so that an increase in immigration reduces the wages of immigrants relative to natives. We show this using a pooled time series of British cross-sectional micro data of observations on male wages and employment from the mid-1970s to the mid-2000s. This lack of substitution also means that there is little discernable effect of increased immigration on the wages of native-born workers, but that the only sizeable effect of increased immigration is on the wages of those immigrants who are already here.
  • RePEc:crm:wpaper:0608
  • Immigration to the UK has risen in the past 10 years and has had a measurable effect on thesupply of different types of labour. But, existing studies of the impact of immigration on thewages of native-born workers in the UK (e.g. Dustmann, Fabbri and Preston, 2005) have failedto find any significant effect. This is something of a puzzle since Card and Lemieux, (2001) haveshown that changes in the relative supply of educated natives do seem to have measurable effectson the wage structure. This paper offers a resolution of this puzzle - natives and immigrants areimperfect substitutes, so that an increase in immigration reduces the wages of immigrantsrelative to natives. We show this using a pooled time series of British cross-sectional micro dataof observations on male wages and employment from the mid-1970s to the mid-2000s. This lackof substitution also means that there is little discernable effect of increased immigration on thewages of native-born workers.
  • Wages, wage inequality, immigration
  • RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0754
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment