English, Article edition: Preventing Relapse of Psychotic Illness: Role of Self-Monitoring of Prodromal Symptoms Lisa Hewitt; Max Birchwood

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/46897
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Preventing Relapse of Psychotic Illness: Role of Self-Monitoring of Prodromal Symptoms
Author
  • Lisa Hewitt
  • Max Birchwood
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • The consequences of psychotic relapse have been found to be damaging to both psychiatric clients and their families, as well as having a detrimental effect on the financial resources of mental health services. As a result of these findings, it is viewed that effective relapse prevention should form an integral component of standard psychiatric care. The prodromal phase of psychosis offers an important window of opportunity for such intervention, and also appears to contain a predictive feature in the progression of an individual's psychosis. The prodromal phase is perhaps best viewed as the emergence of early signs, and signifies the onset of psychotic relapse. A number of techniques have been developed to address the issue of relapse prevention, including pharmacological and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) approaches. However, it is viewed that incorporating patient self-monitoring may result in more effective relapse prevention. The early intervention Back In The Saddle (BITS) approach is based on educating clients about early signs, and helping them to develop skills in self-monitoring. This collaborative therapeutic technique is aimed at constructing a relapse signature, developing a relapse drill, and helping the client to achieve a greater sense of understanding and control over their illness. It is concluded that relapse prevention is vitally important to the recovery process. By involving clients and educating them to use self-monitoring techniques, we can influence the progression of psychosis and the impact it makes upon peoples' lives. Ultimately, it is hoped that effective relapse prevention will reduce hospitalization, and consequentially decrease the financial demands upon mental health trusts.
  • Antipsychotics, Cognitive behavioural therapy, Pharmacoeconomics, Psychiatric disorders
  • RePEc:wkh:dmhout:v:10:y:2002:i:7:p:395-407
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment