English, Article edition: Cost Effectiveness of Antibacterial Restriction Strategies in a Tertiary Care University Teaching Hospital Caterina Tsiata; Vassilis Tsekouras; Antonis Karokis; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/46834
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Cost Effectiveness of Antibacterial Restriction Strategies in a Tertiary Care University Teaching Hospital
Author
  • Caterina Tsiata
  • Vassilis Tsekouras
  • Antonis Karokis
  • John Starakis
  • Harry P. Bassaris
  • Mihalis Maragoudakis
  • Athanasios T. Skoutelis
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Objective: To compare various strategies for antibacterial administration in terms of patient outcomes, overall costs and quality of care provided. Design: Prospective, nonblind, randomized, clinical study. Setting: Tertiary care hospital in Greece from November 1995 to June 1996. Patients and participants: 458 patients admitted to the internal medicine department who received antibacterial therapy for infectious diseases. Methods: Patients were randomized into 4 different antibacterial administration policies defined by various levels of restriction control. Efficacy and resource use data were obtained from clinical study case report forms, the hospital financial database and physician expert opinion. Outcomes included complete infection control, disease improvement, unchanged patient condition, infection needing surgical treatment, and death. Direct medical costs were estimated. The perspective adopted was that of the healthcare system (hospital budget; third-party payor). Cost-minimisation analysis was based on cost per patient treated. Results: 382 eligible patient records examined showed no significant difference in clinical outcomes among patient groups. Baseline analysis showed the strict antibacterial control policy to produce statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in various resource parameters. Accordingly, compared with all other patient groups, total cost per patient for that strategy was reduced by 26 to 30%. Also, patients in that group received fewer drug doses and underwent fewer treatment days, and antibacterial treatment was modified in fewer cases for these patients. Conclusion: Strict control of antibacterial administration in this hospital setting achieved lower direct medical costs with no harmful effect on patient outcomes or quality of care provided. Such a policy appears to be a useful option for both physicians and administrators.
  • Antibacterials, Bacterial infections, Cost analysis, Pharmacoeconomics
  • RePEc:wkh:dmhout:v:9:y:2001:i:1:p:23-32
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment