English, Article edition: A Comparative Cost Analysis of Participating versus Non-Participating Somatizing Patients Referred to a Behavioral Medicine Group in a Health Maintenance Organization Steven E. Locke; Patricia Ford; Thomas McLaughlin

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/46621
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • A Comparative Cost Analysis of Participating versus Non-Participating Somatizing Patients Referred to a Behavioral Medicine Group in a Health Maintenance Organization
Author
  • Steven E. Locke
  • Patricia Ford
  • Thomas McLaughlin
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Aim: To determine whether participation in a six-session behavioral medicine group program was associated with a post-intervention decrease in health costs among participants. Methods: A retrospective study conducted in a convenience sample of 295 high utilizers of healthcare at a health maintenance organization in northeast USA. High utilizers were considered to be those patients with at least $US1500 in utilization costs (excluding eye care, dental services and pharmacy services) in the 12 months prior to the course. Five patients with $US20 Healthcare utilization for both groups was measured for two epochs: the 12 months before the referral and the 12 months following the referral for the control group, or the 12 months following completion of the program for the PHIP group. Results: The PHIP course significantly decreased utilization from an average of $US4079 prior to course participation to an average of $US2462 in the 12-month period after the course, a decrease of $US1616 (p < 0.0001). Utilization in the comparison group decreased by $US608 (from $US4347 before referral to $US3739 12 months after referral). Post-intervention health costs were $US1008 less than those observed in the control group during the same time period. There was a mean decrease in costs from baseline of 25% for the PHIP group and less than 1% for the control group (p =​ 0.031, one-tailed). Conclusion: This cost saving, if attributable to a direct impact of PHIP on morbidity and a subsequent reduction in healthcare utilization, would represent roughly a 25% saving in health costs. The study was limited by the non-random assignment to condition and the resulting potential for selection bias, as well as other possible confounds. However, the present finding of lower health costs after PHIP participation is consistent with earlier studies showing reductions in ambulatory visit rates following PHIP. Taken together, these findings suggest that the integration of behavioral medicine group programs into primary care will benefit patients and clinicians as well as help to control health costs.
  • Cognitive-behavioural-therapy, Cost-analysis, Disease-management-programmes, Pharmacoeconomics, Resource-use
  • RePEc:wkh:dmhout:v:11:y:2003:i:5:p:327-335
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment