English, Article edition: Current Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer Teresa G. Hayes; Leif E. Peterson; Armin D. Weinberg

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/46445
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Current Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer
Author
  • Teresa G. Hayes
  • Leif E. Peterson
  • Armin D. Weinberg
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • The management of breast cancer is a significant public health issue. Early detection of breast cancer through screening mammography, physician clinical examination and breast self-examination can reduce breast cancer mortality by approximately 30%. Most major health organisations agree that yearly mammographic screening should begin at the age of 40 years, although there is some controversy about the need for mammography between the ages of 40 and 49 years. The use of mammographic screening is influenced by physician recommendation, cancer-related fears, time constraints and patient age. Genetic screening is appropriate for patients with familial cancer syndromes and certain high-risk population groups such as Ashkenazi Jews. Treatment for breast cancer depends on many factors, including the microscopic characteristics of the tumour, the tumour stage, whether it is sensitive to hormonal treatment or chemotherapy, and the age and menopausal status of the patient. The most important variable is the tumour stage. Early stage cancers are treated surgically by mastectomy or breast conservation surgery plus radiation therapy. For cancers with unfavourable prognostic factors such as larger size, aggressive histology, or rapid doubling times, adjuvant treatment is recommended with chemotherapy or tamoxifen. When breast cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes, adjuvant chemotherapy should be given, followed by tamoxifen for 5 years for patients with hormone receptor-positive tumours. Cancers that are locally advanced are treated with preoperative chemotherapy, surgery, and then postoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The therapy for metastatic cancer can be radiation therapy, chemotherapy or hormonal therapy, depending on the site of spread and the hormone receptor status of the tumour. Most oncologists treat breast cancer in men in a similar fashion as women, with the understanding that breast cancer in men is likely to be hormone receptor-positive.
  • Reviews-on-treatment, Reviews-on-disease, Breast-cancer, Tamoxifen, Antineoplastics, Hormones, Cancer-metastases, Practice-guideline-commentary, Pharmacoeconomics, Breast-cancer, Radiotherapy, Mastectomy
  • RePEc:wkh:dmhout:v:3:y:1998:i:5:p:239-250
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment