English, Article edition: Obesity Modifies the Association of Race/Ethnicity with Medication Adherence in the CARDIA Study Maribel Salas; Catarina I. Kiefe; Pamela J. Schreiner; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/46041
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Obesity Modifies the Association of Race/​Ethnicity with Medication Adherence in the CARDIA Study
Author
  • Maribel Salas
  • Catarina I. Kiefe
  • Pamela J. Schreiner
  • Yongin Kim
  • Lucia Juarez
  • Sharina D. Person
  • O. Dale Williams
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Objective: To assess associations between race/​ethnicity and medication adherence, and the potential modifying effects of weight category (normal, overweight, obese) in a community-based sample. Study design and setting: We studied 1355 participants from the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study who were taking prescription medications in 2000-1. Medication adherence, as rated on the four-item Morisky medication adherence scale (score of 4 =​ maximum adherence), was reported for all participants. Results: The mean age +- SD of participants was 40 +- 3.6 years; 45% were African American and 36% were male. Overall, Whites had a higher proportion of maximum adherence than African Americans (59 vs 41%, respectively; p =​ 0.001). However, this difference was statistically significant only for participants within the normal weight category, of whom 54% of Whites were maximally adherent versus 35% of African Americans (p < 0.05). After adjustment for possible confounding covariates, race/​ethnicity was associated with adherence only in those of normal weight: the odds ratio for maximum adherence in Whites versus African Americans of normal weight was 1.98 (95% CI 1.13, 3.47). Within race/​ethnicity subgroups, weight category was associated with adherence in Whites but not in African Americans. Conclusion: Weight category modifies the association of race/​ethnicity with medication adherence. The high levels of non-adherence observed among African Americans and obese and overweight Whites bodes poorly for treatment of obesity-associated diseases such as cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus.
  • Ethnic-groups, Obesity, Patient-compliance
  • RePEc:wkh:thepat:v:1:y:2008:i:1:p:41-54
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment