English, Article edition: Measuring Preferred Role Orientations for Patients and Providers in Veterans Administration and University General Medicine Clinics Peter J. Kaboli; Austin S. Baldwin; Michael S. Henderson; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/46002
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Measuring Preferred Role Orientations for Patients and Providers in Veterans Administration and University General Medicine Clinics
Author
  • Peter J. Kaboli
  • Austin S. Baldwin
  • Michael S. Henderson
  • Areef Ishani
  • Jamie A. Cvengros
  • Alan J. Christensen
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Background Congruence between patients' and providers' preferred healthcare role orientations has been shown to be important for improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. Thus, it is important to know how different patient and provider populations might vary in preferred role orientations. Abstract: ObjectiveObjective To measure the range of role orientation preferences among patients and providers in two different general medicine clinic populations. Abstract: MethodsMethods Role orientation preferences of patients (n - 319) and providers (n - 151) in six Veterans Administration (VA) primary care clinics and two university-based primary care clinics were measured in a cross sectional survey using the 9-item Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS) sharing subscale among patients and providers. Abstract: ResultsResults VA patients had lower mean PPOS scores (i.e. more provider-centered role preference) than the university clinic patients (31.2 vs 39.7, respectively; p < 0.001). The difference remained significant even after adjusting for age, sex, and education. VA and university clinic providers had similar mean PPOS scores (41.5 vs 42.6, respectively; p - 0.27). Greater differences were found in mean PPOS scores between VA patients and their providers (31.2 vs 41.5, respectively; p < 0.001) than university clinic patients and their providers (39.7 vs 42.6, respectively; p - 0.12). Abstract: ConclusionsConclusions VA patients reported preferences for a more provider-centered role than university clinic patients and there was greater mean difference in preferred role orientations between VA patients and their providers than between university clinic patients and their providers. Differences in preferred role orientations by patients and providers should be considered when designing clinical initiatives and research to improve patient care.
  • RePEc:wkh:thepat:v:2:y:2009:i:1:p:33-38
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment