1762, English, Map, Unpublished edition: Thomas L. Kane and Elizabeth W. Kane Collection Kane, Thomas Leiper, 1822-1883; Kane, Elizabeth Wood, 1836-1909

User activity

Send to:
Thomas L. Kane and Elizabeth W. Kane Collection
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/435360
Physical Description
  • 79 boxes (73 linear feet) + 40 reels of microfilm
  • Diaries, Letters, Maps, Photographs, Legal documents
Published
  • L. Tom Perry Special Collections
  • 1762-1982
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Thomas L. Kane and Elizabeth W. Kane Collection
Creator
  • Kane, Thomas Leiper, 1822-1883
  • Kane, Elizabeth Wood, 1836-1909
Published
  • L. Tom Perry Special Collections
  • 1762-1982
Physical Description
  • 79 boxes (73 linear feet) + 40 reels of microfilm
  • Diaries, Letters, Maps, Photographs, Legal documents
Subjects
Notes
  • Friend to the Mormons; social reformer; son of John K. Kane, a Philadelphia judge who also worked in Washington, D.C. brother of Elisha Kent Kane, an Arctic explorer. Fought on Union side in American Civil War. Developer of Kane, an area of western Pennsylvania. Thomas and his wife, Elizabeth, lived in Kane and in Philadelphia. He traveled to Utah and other parts of the American West, as well as to Jamaica, England, France, and Mexico. ; Extensive journals, correspondence, scrapbooks, maps, photographs, and legal documents. Includes significant information on politics in the early American republic; Philadelphia history; the extended Kane family and their connections to various national and state figures; Thomas's long-term relationship with the Mormons, especially Brigham Young and George Q. Cannon; Elizabeth W. Kane, Thomas's wife; the American Civil War; the American westward movement; Native Americans; Salt Lake City, St. George, and other Utah communities; Mexico; Washington, D.C. Winter Quarters, Nebraska; Kanesville, Iowa; England; France; Jamaica; and Kane, Pennsylvania. Includes correspondence with numerous individuals (see added author tracings in this catalog record for partial list). ; John Kintzing KaneKANE, John Kintzing (16 May 1795-21 February 1858), jurist, political strategist, writer, public office holder, philanthropist, newspaper editor, father of Elisha Kent Kane (1820-1857), General Robert Patterson Kane (1826-1906), and Colonel Thomas Leiper Kane (1822-1883).John Kane--s grandfather was John Kane (originally O--Kane). He left Ireland after 1750 and settled in New York. Shortly thereafter he married Sybil, the daughter of the Reverend Elisha Kent. After the Revolution, his Loyalist sympathies caused him to relocate to England. His family, however, went to Nova Scotia, except for his sons who returned to New York. One of these, Elisha, was a merchant. He married Alida Van Rensselaer. In the course of their marriage, John Kintzing Kane was born and named --œJohn Kane,-- and in 1801 their little family moved to Philadelphia. Not many years thereafter, Alida passed away, and Elisha married Elizabeth Kintzing in 1807. Feeling fondness for his new stepmother, and a desire to distinguish himself from his cousins who shared his name, John adopted the middle name --œKintzing-- in honor of his stepmother.Kane attended local boarding schools in his youth, none of which were too far from Philadelphia. In 1809 he began his studies at a tutoring school in New Haven. One year of attendance proved sufficient preparation for him, and from there he entered Yale College. He graduated from Yale College in 1814, and returned to Philadelphia.In Philadelphia, Kane aimed to realize his childhood dream of practicing law. In short time he was studying law in Joseph Hopkinson--s office, and was admitted to the bar on 8 April 1817. Commencing his own practice, Kane quickly established his reputation.These early years also found Kane starting a family. In April 1819, he married Jane Duval Leiper (1796-1866) of Philadelphia. Over the years they would have seven children: Elisha Kent Kane (1820-1857), Thomas L. Kane (1822-1883), John Kent Kane (1824-?), General Robert Patterson Kane (1827-1906), Elizabeth Kane (c.1830-1869), John Kintzing Kane, Junior (1833- 1886), and William Leiper Kane (1838-1856).In 1824 Kane campaigned for a seat in the Pennsylvania legislature. For one year he represented the Federalist Party, and then returned to Philadelphia to become an attorney and board member for the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company. (Throughout his life connections with businesses would also include the Franklin Fire Insurance Company, the Sunbury &​ Erie Railroad, and the Mutual Assurance Company.) Kane continued his affiliation with the Federalist Party in its final days, but started leaning toward the Democrats until finally he threw in his support for Andrew Jackson in the presidential campaign of 1828. Kane campaigned for Jackson by raising money, coordinating meetings, and putting into national circulation a pamphlet he authored: Candid View of the Presidential Question. Not everyone admired his efforts. With disaffiliation from the Federalists, Kane earned opponents by supporting Jackson--s position against the United State--s Second Bank. Standing clearly to lose in this proposal, Nicholas Biddle, fellow Philadelphian and Bank president, figured prominently in the opposition to Kane and Jackson.Kane further solidified his identification of the Democratic Party in 1828. He contributed to the successful campaign of Philadelphia--s Democratic mayoral candidate, and in return was named solicitor of the city. Kane held this position from 1829 to 1830, and again briefly in 1832. Meanwhile, on July 4, 1831, the United States had held a convention with France. President Jackson appointed Kane as one of the commissioners to settle claims in connection with the convention. He held this post until 1836, at which time he published a report on the Commission--s work, Notes on Some of the Questions Decided by the Board of Commissioners under the Convention with France, of 4th July, 1831.Following this work, Kane returned to Philadelphia. Fortunate to have inherited a considerable estate, Kane had the luxury of dabbling in his law practice while he pursued various social endeavors. Involvement with the Presbyterian Church took up much of his time. He served as a board member in the Church--s General Assembly, and, in 1837, assisted in splitting the denomination. He ended up siding with other Old School board members who had felt the need to separate the Church from New School synods that were formed in the Great Awakening. Kane also headed the board of trustees for Philadelphia--s Second Presbyterian Church, and took an active interest in the architectural design and erection of the new building.Kane--s social interests had led him to join the American Philosophical Society in 1825. He served as its secretary from 1828 to 1848, vice-president from 1849 to 1857, and devoted his life to serving as its president from 1857 until his death. In 1820 he co-founded the Musical Fund Society, a philanthropic organization that raised money through public concerts. Kane--s involvement also extended to Girard College, where he served as a member of its first board of trustees, as well as vice-president of the Institution for the Instruction of the Blind. He subsequently became viceprovost of the Law Academy, and served on the board of the Academy of Fine Arts. These positions opened opportunities for him to join other various lodges and societies.Politics remained an interest of Kane--s. Maintaining his position of influence within the Democratic Party, Kane was instrumental in leading the 1838 Democratic effort to unseat two illegally elected Whig state senators. Known in Pennsylvania as the Buckshot War, this political struggle of Kane--s proved successful. Six years later, in 1844, Kane was again heavily involved in elections. At both the state and national level, Kane wrote pamphlets, delivered speeches, and further organized the party. In recognition of his contributions to the successful election of the Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Kane was appointed in January 1845 to be the Attorney General of Pennsylvania, a position that he held until June 1846. At that time he was appointed by President Polk to a judgeship on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, and continued in the position for life. As a judge, he was particularly adept at deciding admiralty and patent cases, but at least one decision earned him disfavor. In 1856 he had committed an abolitionist to jail for contempt of court in refusing to produce certain slaves. Not only was this unpopular decision for the time, but it also exacerbated the volatile controversy then raging over the Fugitive Slave Act.As mentioned earlier, Kane had some experience in publishing. Though by no means was he broadly published, Kane nonetheless went on to produce notable works such as A Discourse Pronounced Before the Law Academy of Philadelphia (1831) and Autobiography of the Honorable John K. Kane (privately published, 1949). His literary accomplishments included political writings and reports, bulletins for organizations, reports on transportation and manufactures, editing a psalm book and medical treatise, and serving as newspaper editor of the Philadelphia Gazette.Though Kane is most often remembered as a federal judge, recently scholars have come to a greater appreciation of his influential role as a political strategist and writer. Without such command of the party, Kane may have never earned the confidence, respect, and gratitude of presidents and Pennsylvania politicians. Though disliked by some for his occasional unpopular decision or position, Kane merited respect for his untiring labors in supporting the Presbyterian Church, the blind, and science, the arts, and education. After nearly sixty-three years of a full life, Kane died in his home city of Philadelphia of typhoid pneumonia.Based on the following sources:Chaney, Kevin R. "Kane, John Kintzing." In American National Biography, eds. John A. Garraty and Mark C. Carnes, 369-70. Volume 12. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.Frederick, John H. "Kane, John Kintzing." In Dictionary of American Biography, 257-58. Volume 5. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1932.Elisha Kent KaneKANE, Elisha Kent (3 February 1820-16 February 1857), naval officer, physician, Arctic explorer, and pioneer of the American route to the North Pole; the son of John Kintzing Kane (1795-1858), a jurist, and Jane Duval Leiper (1796-1866).Elisha was born in Philadelphia. His father was well known in political and legal circles, both in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. His younger brother, Thomas L. Kane, was well known for his philanthropy, Civil War bravery, and heroic efforts in assisting the Mormons. Out of this tradition of prominence, Elisha was afforded many opportunities to excel at his interests in both the natural sciences and adventure. In his childhood, Elisha contracted rheumatic fever, which seriously impaired his heart. Told by doctors that he only had a short time to live, his father encouraged him to live out his life in adventure, rather than in perpetual convalescence.Kane worked to overcome his ill health, and by age twenty-two obtained a medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed a thesis on using urine samples to determine pregnancy and his work was the leading research study in the field for the next twenty years. Notwithstanding his medical achievements, Elisha--s family doubted that he had the strength to pursue traditional medical practice. Instead, Judge Kane arranged for him to become a surgeon in the U.S. Navy. In the time it took to receive his commission, Elisha joined the first U.S. diplomatic mission to China, under the leadership of Caleb Cushing. Following his adventures in the Far East, Elisha began his naval duties in 1846 with a cruise to Africa.Elisha returned the next year, in the middle of the Mexican War. He was selected by President Polk to deliver a dispatch to General Winfield Scott in Mexico City. Though wounded in battle, Elisha--s heroic efforts in thwarting the enemy in battle made him a war hero back in the states.In 1850, Elisha joined the United States Coast Survey. That same year a government expedition, using ships supplied by Henry Grinnell, was organized to search for the lost British explorer Sir John Franklin. He and his crew had disappeared five years earlier while attempting to find the Northwest Passage. Elisha recognized this opportunity, and applied for and received the position of senior medical officer, thus initiating the first of his Arctic adventures.Elisha doubled as surgeon and official historian for his ship, the brig Advance. Joining forces with another rescue fleet, the Advance and her sister ship commenced searching in Lancaster Sound, north of Hudson Bay. In time they found Franklin--s first campsite, along with the grave sites of three members of his crew, but further searches yielded no further information on the whereabouts of Franklin or his crew. Throughout this expedition, British explorers and others were impressed by Elisha--s intelligence and traveling experience. Later, after returning home, Elisha published an account of their adventures in The U. S. Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin (1853).Elisha never gave hope of finding Franklin and his lost crew. He succeeded in persuading Grinnell and the U.S. Navy to undertake a second expedition. Proceeding on the belief then current among society and some scientists of an open polar sea, Elisha prepared for a second expedition that would push even further than the first expedition had. Once again the brig Advance was donated by Grinell and private contributions financed the trip. It was while these preparations were going on that Elisha met and fell in love with Margaret Fox. Though their families were opposed to their relationship, Elisha made arrangements for his aunt to see to Margaret--s tutoring while he was away.The second Grinnell expedition departed in May 1853, with Elisha in command. As they ventured farther north into unknown waters the ship was surrounded by thick ice. Choosing to press on despite these obstacles, Elisha continued by following the narrow waterway still open along the shore. Before long the ship was trapped in ice and forced to stay for the winter. Though the crew found deficiencies in their supplies, most stayed alive. With the arrival of spring, Elisha sent exploring parties out to gather information. As these men searched for possible escape routes (and two lost their lives in the process), William Morton discovered open water but erroneously led Elisha to believe that he had stumbled across an ocean. Notwithstanding their mistaking a channel for an open polar sea, this discovery opened the way for --œthe American route to the pole.--As spring gave way to summer in 1854, the ice never let up around Elisha--s ship. Soon several of Elisha--s men informed him that they were heading out overland in hopes of reaching southern settlements of Greenland. Elisha reluctantly allowed this and even supplied the men with food and supplies. Staying behind, Elisha faithfully provided for the needs of his remaining men. As winter enveloped them, Elisha--s innovations saved his crew. He traded with local Inuit for food, and found a way to harvest the abundant rat supply for food and as a remedy for scurvy. In fact, Elisha was so resourceful that he sent excess food to his starving shipmates who had abandoned him and assisted their return to the ship.In 1855, as summer weather once again allowed for an escape, Elisha led his men to the Greenland settlements. Though they never discovered traces of Franklin--s party, Elisha and his crew were found by a government relief expedition and safely returned to America. Elisha--s return was celebrated across America and the work of his crew was noted for its contributions to science and exploration.For Elisha, his return home was the beginning of a busy but brief life. As reports to Congress, lectures, and writing a book filled much of his time, Elisha struggled to become financially independent from his parents and to find time to spend with Margaret Fox. Unable to ignore invitations to visit England, Elisha met with Franklin--s wife to discuss another exploration expedition and received honors from the British government and the Royal Geographical Society. Unfortunately for Elisha, his health deteriorated in the new climate. Elisha then sailed to Havana, Cuba, seeking relief, but in two months he was dead. The news of Elisha--s death captured the American public--s attention. Thousands gathered in every city to share in the grief for the passing of a national hero. It was said that his last book on Arctic explorations lay for a decade alongside the Bible in nearly every American--s home, and that only the funeral processions of Abraham Lincoln and Robert Kennedy ever approached the magnitude of tribute paid to Elisha Kent Kane.Based on the following sources:Dow, Margaret Elder. "Kane, Elisha Kent." In Dictionary of American Biography, 256-57. Volume 5. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1932.Heckathorn, Ted. "Kane, Elisha Kent." In American National Biography, eds. John A. Garraty and Mark C. Carnes, 368-69. Volume 12. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.Thomas Leiper KaneKANE, Thomas Leiper (27 January 1822-26 December 1883), lawyer, soldier, philanthropist, entrepreneur and defender of the Mormons, was born in Philadelphia, PA, the son of John Kintzing Kane (1795-1858), a jurist, and Jane Duval Leiper (1796-1866), and brother of Elisha Kent Kane (1820-1857), Arctic explorer.He attended school in Philadelphia, and from 1839 to 1844 lived in England and France in order to recover his health, as well as to study and visit relatives. Never robust and small in stature (5'6", 130 lbs.) he would spend most of his life struggling with ill health. While in Paris he served as an attaché of the American legation. He also met Auguste Comte and others who surely encouraged his idealism and what would be manifested in his concern for philanthropic causes. He returned to Philadelphia in 1844, having gained greater appreciation for America--s freedoms, and studied law with his father. He was admitted to the bar in 1846 and clerked briefly for his father who was a federal judge, but his life's activities generally moved in other directions.One of the most important and long-term associations began in 1846 when he read Philadelphia newspaper accounts of the forced exodus of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly called Mormons) across Iowa from their Illinois homes. At the same time, Mormon Elder Jesse C. Little had arrived in town to address a Mormon conference. Kane sought out local Mormon leaders, learned more of their western hegira and, after obtaining letters of introduction to Brigham Young, intended to head west to the Mormon encampments on the Missouri River, near present-day Omaha, Nebraska. Meanwhile, Little and Kane met up in Washington D.C. where Kane introduced Little to government officials.Following this and earlier Mormon requests for federal aid, Kane--s father used his influence to obtain help for the Mormons from the Polk administration, which came in the form of government assistance (advance pay and equipment) in return for Mormon men enlisting to fight for the United States in the Mexican War. With these preparations underway, Little and Kane took a train to St. Louis. From there Kane himself delivered the President's instructions to the military officials at Ft. Leavenworth, and then journeyed to the Mormons-- settlement to help recruit the individuals who would eventually make up the Mormon Battalion. He labored to secure permission for the Mormons to travel through and live on Indian lands, assisted them in getting a Post Office established for their settlements, and, in a tribute to his work in their behalf, they named their main settlement on the east side of the Missouri River, in Iowa Territory, Kanesville in 1848. It retained this name until 1853 when it was changed to Council Bluffs. Thomas L. Kane's family connections, communication skills, integrity, and genuine compassion for the downtrodden, were to be effective tools in defending the Latter-day Saints throughout his lifetime. He became Brigham Young's closest non-Mormon friend and confidant.Kane learned first hand in 1846 that before anything could be done for the Mormon cause that public opinion against them must be corrected. Throughout his life he lectured, published and authored letters and editorials defending the Mormons. Though initially he recommended territorial status, Kane reversed and advised Brigham Young in 1849 to apply for statehood for Utah (proposed as "Deseret"), anticipating that the government would send oppressive outsiders if Utah was made a territory; but Utah's future got caught up in the Compromise of 1850 and entered the union as a territory. Kane also warned against partisan politics, feeling that the Mormons could not afford to alienate other groups. In March 1850 Kane delivered an address to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania on "The Mormons". In printed form it was widely distributed and helped to modify public opinion about the Latter-day Saints. When President Millard Fillmore was being politically attacked in 1851 for his policies toward the Mormons, Kane wrote several influential letters supporting the Mormons to Fillmore. During various political crises of the nineteenthcentury, Kane wrote newspaper editorials defending the Mormons. Even with the 1852 announcement that the Mormons were practicing polygamy, Kane continued to defend his friends without endorsing plural marriage. His close friendship with newspapermen like Horace Greeley also helped in shaping more positive public perceptions of the Mormons. Kane rejected Brigham Young's offer to be the territorial delegate in the U.S. Congress from Utah in 1854, but Kane would lobby the Grant Administration in 1869 for the appointment as Governor of Utah Territory. President Ulysses S. Grant spent part of the summer of 1869 enjoying the hospitality of Kane's home as he unsuccessfully lobbied for this appointment. He also worked closely with Mormon representatives assigned to the Nation's Capitol in formulating policy and public positions. He was particularly close to George Q. Cannon--one of Brigham Young's counselors and Utah's Territorial Representative in Congress (a lobbyist after 1867 and the official delegate after 1872). Kane and Cannon visited and corresponded over matters like polygamy, migration, finances, and legal affairs, until Kane--s death in 1883.Kane married his sixteen-year old second cousin, Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood (1836-1909). She had decided to marry him when in her youth, and on 21 April 1853 her dream was realized. They were the parents of four children: Harriet Amelia Kane (1854-1896), Elisha Kent Kane (1856-1935), Evan O'Neill Kane (1861-1932), and Thomas L. Kane, Jr. (1863-1929). In spite of Elizabeth--s youth, Kane married a woman of intellectual abilities that are evident from her diaries and various writings. She and Thomas kept journals with the promise to record their thoughts and actions, especially for times when he was absent. Though they differed at times over things like the slavery question and struggled with religious unity, Thomas and Elizabeth remained devoted to each other throughout their years.Kane again came west in 1857-58 during a time of grave crisis. Giving up his court clerkship to rescue his Mormon friends, Kane embarked with only a presidential letter of introduction. President James Buchanan had received a variety of reports claiming all kinds of illegal misbehavior by the Mormons and their leaders in Utah and various Indian agencies. In response, Buchanan dispatched a federal military expedition to Utah under the command of General Albert Johnston, and appointed a new governor to replace Brigham Young. Although Mormons burned Fort Bridger and Fort Supply in Wyoming, making the military--s winter stay harsh and with few supplies, Kane managed to moderate Buchanan's views, obtained Presidential support for an unofficial attempt at peace-making, helped soften Mormon defensiveness, won the confidence of the new Governor, Alfred Cumming, and thus helped to bring a peaceful end to a potentially bloody confrontation. His daring personal travel to Utah and then to the winter encampment of the army in Wyoming, and his moderating approach to all major parties revealed his communication skills at their best. He surely made the work of the officially appointed presidential peace commissioners, Lasarus Powell and Ben McCulloch, much easier. Utah would name a city and a county after him, and later in 1959 commissioned a heroic-size bronze statue of him that was placed in the rotunda of the Utah State Capitol. Perhaps most telling were Brigham Young--s comments upon Kane--s arrival in Salt Lake: --œI want to have your name live to all eternity. You have done a great work and you will do a greater work still.--Kane was a powerful advocate for social justice. He served as a United States District Commissioner, but resigned in 1850 in protest of the Fugitive Slave Law. His father ordered him jailed in contempt of court, but he was soon released by a Supreme Court ruling. Kane joined the Free Soil Movement in the 1850s, was an active supporter of the abolitionist cause and even worked with the Underground Railroad in the 1850s. He would also have benevolent feelings toward the Native Americans. After his brother Elisha died a national hero, Thomas--s ambitions only increased as he strived to match his brother--s accomplishments.When the Civil War began in 1861, Kane was the first Pennsylvanian to enlist and was commissioned by President Abraham Lincoln to organize a volunteer regiment (13th Pennsylvania Reserves) for the Union Army. This group, the Kane Rifles or the "Bucktails", would be decorated for their military actions during the War. He was commissioned a lieutenant colonel on 21 June 1861. Kane himself was slightly wounded in mid-December in an engagement at Dranesville, VA, and again at Harrisonburg in the Shenandoah Valley, after which he was taken prisoner in June 1862. He was released a short time later as part of a prisoner exchange. He fought at Chancellorsville in May 1863 and at Gettysburg in July 1863. He authored a military manual in 1862 on "Instruction for Skirmishers" which he planned to be the first volume of a series on Tactics. Wounds and continued ill health led to his resignation on 7 November 1863, but only after Elizabeth had traveled through rebel lines at great peril to herself to nurse him and others. He was breveted Major General for "Gallant and Meritorious Services at Gettysburg" on 13 March 1865.As early as 1856 he was involved in land development in western Pennsylvania, especially around the town that would come to be called Kane in the 1860s. After the Utah War, without money and employment, Kane moved his little family to the McKean and Elk counties of remote northwestern Pennsylvania and became a principal organizer in the McKean and Elk Land Improvement Company--an involvement that continued throughout his life. Following the Civil War, he opened roads, encouraged railroad construction and worked to generally improve the area. While business and humanitarian interests occupied her husband, Elizabeth spent much of her spare time caring for the sick and injured, as she was the only physician in their area. Kane also remained active in public life. He was the first president of the Pennsylvania Board of State Charities, was a member of the American Philosophical Society, and was an organizer of the New York, Lake Erie, and Western Coal Railroad Company. He was also the moving force for the building of what was once considered the largest railroad bridge in the world: the 2,053-foot Kinzua viaduct that spans the 301-foot deep Kinzua Creek Valley near Kane, PA.Regarding his association with the Mormons, he remained close to Brigham Young, and at Young's invitation came west again to spend the winter of 1872-73 in southern Utah. Elizabeth Kane's published account of this journey, Twelve Mormon Homes Visited in Succession on a Journey through Utah to Arizona (1874) remains a classic description of Mormon social and religious history. While in southern Utah, Kane and Young discussed expanding Mormon settlements into Mexico, a project both would actively pursue: Kane by spending considerable time in Mexico trying to get a land grant and Young by dispatching a Mormon colony into Arizona. Kane's pamphlet on Coahuila (1877), a Mexican province, also came out of his work. He continued to encourage Mormon expansion in the West. Kane also provided direction for the preparation of Brigham Young's will and counseled Young to separate his personal property from that of the Church. Kane would also assist in obtaining a Philadelphia lawyer who would draw-up Young's will. In addition, Kane helped Brigham Young in the preparation of the documents that would help in the founding of several colleges in Utah: Brigham Young College in Logan, Young University in Salt Lake City, and the only one to survive, the Brigham Young Academy in Provo (now Brigham Young University). No doubt Kane also sought Brigham Young--s advice on various issues.In spite of his close association with the Mormons, Kane never joined the LDS Church, but the feelings of the Mormons for him are expressed in a letter Wilford Woodruff wrote to him a year after the Utah War: --œThe name of Colonel Thomas L. Kane stands most prominent, . . . an instrument, in the hands of God, and inspired by him, to turn away, in 1858, the edge of the sword, and save the effusion of much blood, performing what the combined wisdom of the nation could not accomplish, and changing the whole face of affairs, the effects of which will remain forever. Your name will of necessity stand associated with the history of this people for years to come, whatever may be their destiny.--When Brigham Young died in August 1877, Kane again came west to offer his condolences to the Mormon people, and to reassure Church leaders of his own continued support of their cause. He continued to correspond with and personally meet with various leaders of the Mormon Church. He died in 1883 of pneumonia at his home in Philadelphia, and even though he had requested that his heart be buried in the Salt Lake Temple --œthat after death it may repose where in metaphor at least it was when living,-- he was interred near the family chapel in Kane, Pennsylvania.Based on the following sources:Frederick, John H. "Kane, Thomas Leiper." In Dictionary of American Biography, 258-59. Volume 5. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1932.McAllister, David. --œThomas Leiper Kane.-- In Utah History Encyclopedia, ed. Allan Kent Powell, 295- 96. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1994.Whittaker, David J. "Kane, Thomas Leiper." In American National Biography, eds. John A. Garraty and Mark C. Carnes, 370-72. Volume 12. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.Zobell, Albert L., Jr. Sentinel in the East: a Biography of Thomas L. Kane. Salt Lake City, Utah: N.G. Morgan, 1965.Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood [Kane][KANE], Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood (12 May 1836-29 May 1909), physician, teacher, prohibitionist, philanthropist, wife of Thomas Leiper Kane (1822-1883), and daughter of William Wood (1807- 1890).Elizabeth was born at Bootle, a suburb of Liverpool, England. Her father was William Wood, a young Scotsman connected with the banking house of Dennistoun, Wood &​ Co at Glasgow. Harriet Amelia Kane, a beautiful American and daughter of a New York merchant, was her mother. Elizabeth was born the third of six children and afforded a cultured and well-educated upbringing. Thomas, her future husband, was about fourteen years her senior. Notwithstanding this age difference, Elizabeth took up a lifelong enchantment with him after he visited her, when she was six, and presented her with a French doll--forever after a treasured possession. In 1844, when Elizabeth would have been nearly eight years old, her family immigrated to America, thus bringing her closer to her admired cousin. The sad death of Harriet, their mother, struck Elizabeth--s family when she was ten. Her father William remarried the next year, restoring some semblance of balance to the family, and by the age of twelve Elizabeth remarked to her sister that she was surprised everyone didn--t already know that she intended to marry her second cousin Thomas. And in 1853, when Elizabeth was sixteen, she did. Thomas was both a husband and a father to her. It was at his suggestion that she began keeping journals and other records of their life. She would also serve as his secretary.In the early years of their marriage, Thomas and Elizabeth lived in Philadelphia, where John Kintzing Kane was serving as a United States District Court judge. Though Thomas held positions in law from time to time, his interests often led him onto different projects. Thus, when Thomas was away from home, Elizabeth would be left with family or to provide for herself and the children. At times such as Thomas-- trip to Utah in 1857 and 1858, she worried about Thomas-- health and affiliation with the Mormons, and was anxious for religious unity between the two of them, yet her most pressing need was to address the financial situation of herself and her children. Fortunately, while staying in John Kintzing Kane--s home, Elizabeth--s young family was provided for. As her needs were not provided for, Elizabeth also yearned to improve her abilities and station. She found some satisfaction in her two or three years of studies at the Women--s Medical College of Pennsylvania--a school Thomas had helped to incorporate.When Thomas returned from Utah, he and Elizabeth moved their family to northwestern Pennsylvania, to live and develop the land in McKean and Elk counties. They lived there eight months of each year among the mountaineers at Upland, a farm on the McKean county line near Rasselas. While Thomas busied himself with bringing in railroads, highways, and lumbermills (especially during their four months in Philadelphia each year) Elizabeth--s medical skills were put to use in this rural region which still lacked physicians. A short time later the Civil War erupted, and Thomas rushed to be the first Pennsylvanian to enlist. Since Thomas was only allowed rare furloughs to visit his family, he arranged for Elizabeth and their children to stay with his aunt, Ann Gray Thomas, in Philadelphia. Learning that Thomas had received wounds and was taken captive by the enemy, Elizabeth received permission to pass through enemy lines and visit her husband.In 1864 Thomas returned home to recuperate and once again took up his interest in the McKean and Elk Land Improvement Company. He and Elizabeth founded a modest settlement that grew into a town later named Kane by leaders of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The first fall and winter back were difficult; they lived in their stable while hurrying to build a home. These trying times caused Elizabeth to take on additional roles, as she continued her practice of medicine, and filled in as secretary and accountant in the land business. On top of that she raised their four children, the last of which was born in November of 1863: Harriet Amelia Kane (1854-1896), Elisha Kent Kane (1856-1935), Evan O'Neill Kane (1861-1932), and Thomas L. Kane, Jr. (1863-1929).During this period, Elizabeth focused and articulated in writing many of her ideas about women. Dismayed with society--s limitations upon women and the general collapse of morals, Elizabeth worked out what she called her --œTheory.-- Within it she outlined the path of Christian service and hard work for exceptional women who desired to accomplish great things. Not one to be a hypocrite, Elizabeth set these standards as her own goals, and worked to educate herself and increase her abilities while simultaneously laboring to provide necessities for herself and her family.After an unsuccessful bid for a congressional seat in 1872, and beset with ill health, Thomas saw the wisdom in accepting an invitation from friends in the Mormon church to travel west and accompany Brigham Young on his annual trip to St. George in southern Utah, where sunny weather and healthy climate would hopefully facilitate his recovery. Elizabeth and two sons, Evan and Willie (later Thomas L., Jr.), accompanied Thomas in this trip to Utah. Two publications have resulted from Elizabeth--s writings while in Utah: Twelve Mormon Homes Visited in Succession on a Journey Through Utah to Arizona (1874) and A Gentile Account of Life in Utah--s Dixie, 1872-73: Elizabeth Kane--s St. George Journal (1995). While there, Elizabeth--s attitudes softened toward Mormons as they opened their homes and extended their friendship, and Thomas regained his strength and spent much time discussing serious matters with Brigham Young.Upon returning from Utah, Thomas and Elizabeth once again encountered misfortune. Someone, perhaps a relative, had bankrupted them by forging a check on their account. On top of that, the panic of 1873 left their railroad and coal lands unmarketable. Left with no income and little recourse, Elizabeth sold their silver and she and Thomas struggled with their land development company. During this period, Thomas had refused to let his Aunt Thomas leave her fortune to him. In a touching example of Kane innovation, his aunt instead built the Presbyterian church, known now as the Kane Memorial Chapel, close to their home so that they and their children might worship.It was not until the latter part of the 1870s, once timber attracted lumberman and the Erie Railroad brought an influx of settlers, that the Kanes could again enjoy relative prosperity. In later years, it was only with industrial growth in Kane and discovery of oil on her lands near Mt. Jewett that Elizabeth--s family found financial security.Elizabeth was a leader in her family in studying and practicing medicine. Although she did not earn her M.D. until 1883, Elizabeth practiced and magnified her skills throughout her life. Harriet, Thomas and Elizabeth--s daughter, graduated simultaneously with her mother in 1883 from the Women--s Medical College of Philadelphia. In addition, the two sons that accompanied Elizabeth and Thomas to Utah in 1872-73 both studied at Jefferson Medical College and became physicians. Of these two, Evan went on to establish Kane--s Woodside Hospital, which was later moved into Kane, enlarged through Elizabeth--s assistance, and incorporated under the name of Kane Summit Hospital. Here Elizabeth served as treasurer, member of the board of managers, and practiced medicine with her children. Evan credited the establishment of the hospital with the memory of his father--s constant struggle with illness.On December 26, 1883, Elizabeth--s husband, Thomas L. Kane, died from pneumonia and old Civil War wounds. Elizabeth--s resilience bore her through this time, and allowed her to continue her work as physician and --œmother-- of the town of Kane. She taught a Sunday school class in the local Presbyterian Church, and labored for the cause of Prohibition. Despite a threat on her son--s life and the attempted building of saloons in Kane, she was undeterred in her fight for temperance through license-fighting and prohibition campaigns. She was elected as a local president of the --œW.C.T.U.-- (Women--s Christian Temperance Union), and represented her fellow members at state and national conventions.Although Elizabeth had found financial and social success, she endured more challenging losses in the 1890s. Having lost her husband a decade previous, Elizabeth--s grief was nearly as devastating when her father died on October 1, 1894. Ever since her marriage over forty years before, these two had exchanged weekly letters sharing some of their deepest feelings. Tragedy struck again for Elizabeth only two years later. Harriet, her only daughter and a tireless companion in temperance and philanthropic work, fell dead in church in 1896 while leading a prayer and song meeting. At forty-one, Harriet had been a young but white-haired lady who nobly fought a losing battle against a then obscure ailment.Elizabeth--s health and productivity stayed with her until the last five years of her life. Yet even as the effects of age took their toll, Elizabeth continued her aggressive passion for learning. For instance, Elizabeth studied Spanish throughout her last winter. On the morning of May 25, 1909, after a full and satisfying life, her remaining children and grandchildren gathered around her bed at home for a final goodbye, and Elizabeth fell into a tranquil sleep from which she never woke.Based on the following sources:Kane, Elizabeth Dennistoun. --œBrief Biography of the Author Elizabeth Dennistoun Kane.-- In Story of John Kane of Duchess County, New York, 3-10. J. B. Lippincott Company, 1921.Solomon, Mary Karen Bowen. --œProfile of Elizabeth Kane.-- In A Gentile Account of Life in Utah--s Dixie, 1872-73: Elizabeth Kane--s St. George Journal, Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood Kane, with preface and notes Norman R. Bowen, xv-xxix. Salt Lake City, Utah: Tanner Trust Fund, University of Utah, 1995.Elisha Kent KaneThe Honorable E. Kent Kane was born on 19 April 1902 in Kane, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Elisha Kent Kane and Grizelda E. Hays, and the grandson of Thomas L. Kane and Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood. He was raised to cherish and honor the Kane family name. Though actually named Elisha Kent Kane, he went instead by E. Kent Kane--likely to avoid being mistaken for his father and other Kane relatives named Elisha.He developed an interest in government and chose to be trained in the law. Alma Ray Bryan and he were married on 17 March 1929. E. Kent maintained a lifelong interest in his noble ancestors, and was especially fond of learning about his legendary grandfather, Thomas L. Kane. Undoubtedly he knew that his grandfather had been a friend to the Mormons, but E. Kent admitted later in life that it was not until age thirty-five that he --œso much as set eyes on a Mormon.-- In 1939, however, things changed. Arrangements were made for President Heber J. Grant and other Mormon leaders to accompany E. Kent and his family on a tour of Utah that would retrace his grandparents-- 1872 trip with Brigham Young. On this delightful trip across Utah, they traveled through many of the towns that his grandmother described in her book Twelve Mormon Homes, including Nephi, Fillmore, Cove Fort, Cedar City, St. George, and then Manti on the return trip.Around the same time in his life, E. Kent--s ambitions led him to serve his fellow citizens on the Pennsylvania State Legislature for six years. As World War II approached, though, E. Kent switched to serving his country as a Lieutenant Commander in the Navy. He survived the war and returned home safely. In 1947, E. Kent and his family were again requested to visit Utah. By this time George Albert Smith had become President of the Church. His Smith ancestors had known Thomas L. Kane since their days in Winter Quarters. Acknowledging the great role that E. Kent--s grandfather had in early Mormon history, President Smith invited E. Kent to address the Mormon Church in their annual General Conference. He accepted and spoke of the great accomplishments of his grandfather in behalf of the Mormons. It was also during these years that he pursued his research interests in his grandfather--s life, writing and visiting from time to time with historians and librarians.His life was also changing in other ways. After giving birth to their three children, Alma and E. Kent dissolved their marriage. In time, though, he and Dorothy Heller Bergey were married on 8 July 1951. Twelve years later E. Kent was invited to Utah once again, but this time by the State. He was privileged to address the citizens of Utah in 1959 at the unveiling of a new statue of his grandfather at the Utah State Capitol. He and Dorothy--who was thirteen years younger than him--may have split up by this time. In any case, their marriage lasted long enough to share in the birth of a child.On 13 February 1960, E. Kent entered into his third and final marriage--this time to Clara Frieda (Brown) Browning. Being five years older than E. Kent, and clearly past childbearing age, she brought with her two children from her previous marriage. After this time, little is known of E. Kent. He maintained his residence in Pennsylvania and ran for political office in 1964. Unfortunately, he lost the race. From his correspondence files it is apparent that he kept up relationships with family and friends until at least 1978. He likely died that year or soon thereafter. A number of his research files are now housed at Brigham Young University. Though E. Kent never produced the biography of Thomas L. Kane on which he labored for years, he learned for himself that his inspiring grandfather had truly been held in --œhonorable remembrance.--Based on the following source:Evans, Frank. --œElder Frank Evans,-- General Conference Reports (October 1947): 101-5. This Kane family collection came to Brigham Young University in three main installments. Each was purchased from family descendants, in 1978, 1983, and 1996. The first installment was acquired from Sybil Kane. The second came when the Library purchased Kane material from the E. Kent Kane estate. These two groups were integrated into one collection by 1995 under the direction of Dennis Rowley, then Curator of Manuscripts. He was also given a collection of typescripts of mostly Thomas L. Kane letters by Lyndon W. Cook. The Cook typescripts were integrated into the collection by 1995. These have since been removed and can be found as a separate collection [MSS 2221].Then, in 1996, BYU Library acquired its largest collection of Kane family manuscripts. These materials, including printed material and photographs, were purchased from Thomas L. Kane and his wife Dorothy through their representative, Cameron Treleaven, a rare book dealer in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. This much larger group came to BYU unorganized. Following the preparation of a very detailed inventory of this newer acquisition, it was decided to combine it with the earlier compilation. It became clear that the best way to organize the materials was around key Kane Family members. Hence, organization can be seen as a chronological, centered on a few of the Kane family. Because it was not always possible to segregate each person--s papers into neatly packaged folders, the researcher is warned that materials relating to other Kane family members can be found in Series other than the major grouping. We trust that this Register is sufficiently detailed to assist the researcher in finding the specific person or topic of interest. What follows is a brief summary of the Twelve Series of the collection.Series I: Judge John K. Kane This series gathers the early family and business materials as well as the papers of the Judge Kane into six sub-series. This series includes earlier family materials as well as manuscripts that focus on the life and activities of Judge Kane.Series II: Thomas L. Kane Personal Papers This series gathers the more personal papers of Thomas l. Kane into six sub-series. It includes papers relating to his youth, a large collection of letters he sent home from England and France, his early correspondence with Elizabeth Wood, and their correspondence following their marriage. It also includes his correspondence with Elizabeth--s father, William Wood, as well as with other Kane family members.Series III: Thomas L. Kane and the Mormons This series gathers into fourteen sub-series the material dating from Thomas Kane--s initial meeting with the Mormons in 1846 through his relationships with various Mormons throughout his lifetime. This series gathers all the key materials relating to the call of Mormon Battalion in 1846, the settlement of the Mormons on Indian lands in Nebraska during the winter of 1846-47, the establishment of Winter Quarters and Kanesville, their westward movement, Kane--s public defense of the Mormons, the Utah War period, and later work with individuals like George Q. Cannon. While most of Thomas-- material has been gathered into this section, the researcher ought to remember that Elizabeth, his wife, functioned as his secretary and also kept potentially relevant journals and scrapbooks. Most of her material is gathered into Section VI.Series IV: Thomas L. Kane: The American West and Politics This section gathers material relating to Thomas--s related activities connected with the development of the American West. His lobbying for appointment to Territorial Governorships, his interests in Alaska and Mexico, western railroad development, and his correspondence with a variety of state and national politicians are to be found here.Series V: Civil War Papers of Thomas and Elizabeth Kane This section gathers all the material relating to Thomas-- Civil War experience, including his correspondence with Elizabeth, his capture by the Confederate Army, his release in a prisoner exchange, his Bucktails regiment, and a variety of post-war materials, including his correspondence with the artist of the murals for the Battle of Gettysburg.Series VI: Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood Kane Papers This section, one of the most extensive in the collection, gathers Elizabeth--s manuscripts into five sub-sections. The heart of this section are her fourteen diaries, beginning in 1853 and ending in 1909, although there are numerous gaps in their coverage. The first nine date before Thomas Kane--s death, and thus are important records for his life. This section also includes the papers of her father, William Wood, as well as Elizabeth--s mostly unpublished work.Series VII: Thomas L. and Elizabeth W. Kane Family This section gathers into one area most all the papers of their children and grandchildren. The sub-sections reflect the key individuals or groupings.Series VIII: Kane Family Business Papers This section is organized mostly around the main family business activities. The development of western Pennsylvania, the history of town of Kane, railroad investments, and other more temporal concerns are documented here.Series IX: E. Kent Kane Papers This series documents the life and Kane family history research of a twentieth-century heir. His personal relationship with Mormon leaders, research files and related material are gathered here.Series X: Miscellaneous Items that did not seem to fit neatly into any of the above, were gathered here. Much of the material seemed unrelated to the Kanes, but closer examination could reveal connections.Series XI: Oversized Materials /​ Maps Because of the nature of this material, mostly because of its larger size, it was gathered into a separate series. Most of the material are certificates, legal items, and numerous maps relating to the Kane family activities. The detailed descriptions and listing will lead the researcher through this part of the collection.Series XII: Photographs This series contains all the photographs that were in the collection. The listing is detailed and while the originals have been transferred to Photoarchives, a photocopy or reproduction of each has been retained in the main collection. These copies will allow the research to search this part of the collection without having to personally handle each photograph, thus helping in the conservation of these valuable items. Item numbers on the copies correspond to the numbers assigned to the original photographs.Note:Publications derived from manuscripts in the collection include: Elizabeth W. Kane, Twelve Mormon Homes (1874); A Gentile Account of Life in Utah's Dixie, 1872-73: Elizabeth Kane's St. George Journal (1995); and John K. Kane Autobiography (privately published, 1949). The history of the United States during the nineteenth-century is one of dramatic growth and change. Between the War of 1812 and the Spanish American War in 1898, modern America emerged. Growing from a nation of farmers to an industrial giant, its economic change and challenges were paralleled in just about every other area of life. From religious revivals, reform movements, political parties, the westward movement and territorial growth, the slavery controversy, Civil War and Reconstruction, much that is America came out of this period of ferment.Spanning this century and, in fact, helping to shape it, was the John K. Kane Family. Members of this Philadelphia family were friends of national political leaders, including a number United States Presidents, and as a group, seem to represent all the various aspects of nineteenthcentury history. Their involvement in politics on both a state and national level, their experiences in war and exploration and westward expansion, their relationships with various people both famous and not so famous, offers the researcher a window into many different areas of American life.Thomas L. Kane--s friendship with Brigham Young is especially important for students of Mormon history. From the Latter-day Saint exodus west from Illinois and Iowa in 1846, to the Utah --œWar-- in 1857-58, to a variety of episodes dealing with the national perceptions and treatment of the Mormons, the Kane Collection has important insights.Important also are the papers of the Kane women, especially Elizabeth, Thomas--s wife. Her valuable journals and correspondence are in this collection, and these allow us to view the nineteenth-century through her eyes. As a bright and sensitive woman, Elizabeth was well read and tried to understand the world around her. She experimented with photography; she attended medical school. She hated Mormon polygamy, but came to love the Mormon women. She was a mother and devoted wife, as well as the daughter of William Wood, to whom she remained close throughout her life. It is to her that we owe the preservation of this wonderful family collection.This collection has been organized and very carefully described in the Register that follows. The researcher is advised to read the introductory material before jumping into the collection itself, as this will better introduce the people and contents of this collection as well as explain why it has been organized as it has. Note: This biographical register has been assembled to assist the researcher in identifying key or major individuals in this collection.Jane Addams: (6 September 1860-21 May 1935) Social reformer and peace activist; was among the first generation of college-educated women in the U.S. opened Hull House in the 1890s, a model settlement house that addressed urban problems; became the first woman president of the National Conference of Charities and Correction, 1909-1915; served as a vice-president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association; helped found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931. -American National Biography.James Allen: (?-23 August 1846) Captain of the Mormon Battalion; dispatched by Stephen W. Kearny in 1846 to raise five hundred volunteers from the Mormon camps on the Missouri river; promoted to Lieutenant Colonel; died at Fort Leavenworth while leading the Mormon Battalion to Santa Fe. -The Mormon Battalion and Encyclopedia of Mormonism.Susan B. Anthony: (15 February1820-13 March1906) Reformer and organizer for women--s suffrage; taught in district schools; spoke out in favor of economic equality, suffrage, and anti-slavery societies; in 1852 founded the Women's New York State Temperance Society; in 1863 she helped found the Women's Loyal National League for the cause of abolition; assisted in 1869 in founding the National Woman Suffrage Association; became a symbol of suffrage and enhanced opportunities for women.-American National Biography.William I. Appleby: (13 August 1811-20 May 1870) President pro tempore and president of the Eastern States Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1847 and 1857-1858; after joining the church in 1840, he served as a missionary in New Jersey, Delaware, and Pennsylvania and later presided over the church in those areas, 1841-1849; emigrated to Utah, 1849; returned to the Eastern States as mission president, 1857-1858.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia,4:330.Matthew Arbuckle: (1823-23 May 1883) Musician; noted cornet player and band master; authored the Complete Cornet Method.-Who Was Who in America.Historical Volume, 1607-1896.Turner Ashby: (23 October 1828-6 June 1862) Confederate cavalry leader; organized a volunteer regiment in reaction to John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry, 1859; began the Civil War as a cavalry officer in the Seventh Virginia Cavalry Regiment; posing as a horse-doctor, he infiltrated behind Union lines and gathered intelligence, 1861; served as a commander of cavalry units during the Shenandoah Valley campaign, 1862; promoted to the rank of brigadier general, 1862; died in action near Harrisonburg, 1862-American National Biography.Almon W. Babbitt: (1 October 1813-October 1856) President of the Kirtland Stake of Zion of the L.D.S. Church; became a member of Zion--s Camp, 1834; called to the quorum of the Seventy, 1835; served a mission to Canada, 1835-1838; disfellowshipped for teaching contradictory doctrine, 1840 and 1841; reinstated in the church and elected president of the Kirtland Stake, 1841; present in Carthage during the assassination of Joseph Smith, 1844; presided over the settlement of Nauvoo after the main body of the Saints left for the Salt Lake Valley, 1846-1848; emigrated to Utah, 1848; elected by the territorial legislature as a delegate to Congress to deliver a memorial seeking statehood, 1849; served as secretary of the Territory, 1853-1856; killed by Indians while en route to Washington D.C., 1856.-LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:284-286.O.E. Babcock: (1835-1884) Army officer; graduated from West Point; engineer at Washington and at Harper--s Ferry in Virginia; served as an aid to General Grant; became Grant--s private secretary during his tenure in the White House; acted as Commissioner of Public Affairs, Engineer, and Surveyor of the District of Columbia; indicted for fraud in 1876 but acquitted on strength of the President--s testimony.-Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the United States.Alexander Dallas Bache: (19 July 1806-17 February1867) Physicist; appointed professor of natural philosophy and chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania in1828, later becoming chief of research at the Franklin Institute and the first President of Girard College, 1836; published Education of Europe, that greatly influenced U.S. educational reforms, 1839; appointed Superintendent of the U.S. Coast Guard Survey, 1842-1867; during the Civil War he was one of Lincoln--s advisors and served as vice-president of the Sanitary Commission.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume I.George W. I. Ball: (c. mid 1800s) Author; wrote General Railroad Laws of the State of Pennsylvania, and Acts Relative to Corporations Affecting Railroad Companies (Philadelphia: 1875.)-Allibone's Critical Dictionary of English Literature: A Supplement. British and American Authors.George Bancroft: (3 October 1800-17 January1891) Scholar and diplomat; started in ministerial service; published in North American Review and wrote a History of the United States; involved as a Democrat in politics; first public office was as collector of the port of Boston; joined the Cabinet as Secretary of the Navy in 1844; eighteen months later accepted position of Ambassador to Great Britain, where he served until 1848; resumed writing his History; reentered public life and politics in 1854; left in 1867 as ambassador to Prussia; returned to the U.S. in 1874 determined to finish his historical projects; served in 1885 as the president of the American Historical Association.-American National Biography.George Dashiell Bayard: (18 December 1835-13 December 1862) Soldier; received commission to West Point, 1852; served as second lieutenant of the cavalry on the Kansas and Colorado frontiers; provoked the Kiowa-Comanche uprising, 1859; with outbreak of the Civil War he was appointed colonel of the 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry; served in many early campaigns; appointed chief of cavalry of the III Corps and brigadier general of volunteers, 1862; while in command of the --œleft Grand Division-- of the Battle of Fredericksburg was mortally wounded and died, 1862.-Generals in Blue; Lives of the Union Commanders.Louis Alphonse Bertrand: (8 January 1808-21 March 1875) French socialist, L.D.S. mission president and author; converted to the church in 1850 and subsequently journeyed to Utah, 1855; returned to France as President of the French mission, 1859-1864; also wrote --œLes Prairies,-- a poem contained in the Thomas L. Kane collection.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 4:334.John M. Bernhisel: (23 June 1799-28 September 1881) Doctor and Utah territorial delegate to Congress; studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and practiced in New York State; joined the L.D.S. Church, c. 1840; set apart as a Bishop in the New York area of the Church, 1841; during the persecution of the Saints in Illinois, he wrote a letter to Governor Thomas Ford defending Joseph Smith; migrated west to Utah; elected as Utah--s first delegate to Congress, 1851; served 3 subsequent terms, 1853-1857.-People in History and L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:723-24.Charles John Biddle: (30 April 1819-28 September 1873) Union general, lawyer; son of Nicholas Biddle, former head of the Bank of the United States; fought in the Mexican War; during the Civil War served as Colonel of the 13th Pennsylvania Reserve, June 1861; elected brigadier general of the United States Volunteers 31st, August 1861; forfeited position and ran for seat in Congress, October 1861; resigned commission in the army to devote his full energies to lawmaking, December 1861; after the war, edited The Philadelphia Age.-The Civil War Dictionary.Big Elk: (c.1765-1846) Chief of the Omahas, 1800; embarked on diplomatic missions to Washington D.C. to negotiate treaties, 1821 and 1837; renowned for his captivating oratory skills; was chief of the Omahas during first entry of the Mormons into the Omaha Territory.-The Encyclopedia of Native American Biography.William Bigler: (1 January1814-9 August 1880) Governor and senator; at nineteen began publishing the Clearfield Democrat, a pro-Jackson journal in Pennsylvania; became a large lumber merchant along the Susquehanna; in 1841 was elected to the state senate, and served until 1847, twice as Speaker; won the election for Pennsylvania governor in 1851; became president of the Philadelphia &​ Erie Railroad Company in 1855; elected to the U.S. Senate in 1856, sought pro-slavery measures and assistance for westward expansion; retired from national politics in 1861.-American National Biography.Jeremiah Sullivan Black: (10 January 1810-19 August 1883) U.S. Attorney General and U.S. Secretary of State; ran a law practice in Somerset, Pennsylvania; he was elected to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in 1851; appointed U.S. Attorney General in 1857; defended pro-slavery positions in the courts and opposed radicalism; Black was nominated by Buchanan as Secretary of State in December 1861, but the Senate disagreed, and Black returned to private life; served as a reporter to the Supreme Court and restarted his law practice; his continued involvement in the Democratic party, court cases, and writing kept him in the public eye until his death.-American National Biography.Francis Preston Blair: (12 April 1791-18 October 1876) Journalist, politician; entered the world of professional politics as a clerk of the new court of appeals in Kentucky during New Court vs. Old Court struggles; emerged from the struggle as a clerk of the state circuit court, an editorial contributor to the Argus of Western America, and President of the Commonwealth Bank; later served as editor of the Globe, Jackson--s administration organ, 1830-1848; became a confidential member of Jackson--s kitchen cabinet, joined the Free-soil party; helped organize the Republican party; also served as an advisor to Lincoln.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume I.Rachel Littler Bodley: (7 December 1831-15 June 1888) Botanist, chemist, and educator; became a professor of natural sciences at the Cincinnati Female Seminary, 1862; published well-respected study, Catalogue of Plants Contained in the Herbarium of Joseph Clark, Arranged According to the Natural System, 1865; chosen as the chair of chemistry and toxicology at the Female Medical College in Philadelphia, 1868; appointed as dean, 1874; granted an honorary doctor of medicine degree, 1879; civically, she was an active member of the Educational Society of Philadelphia, 1882; served on the school board of Philadelphia, 1882-1885, 1887-1888.-American National Biography.Samuel Brannan: (2 March 1819-2 May 1889) California pioneer; joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the 1830s in Kirtland, Ohio; directed by Brigham Young to lead the Eastern saints westward; accordingly, he purchased the ship Brooklyn, and led the saints on a five month voyage around Cape Horn to California; helped establish San Francisco; disagreed with Young in 1847 about the necessity of moving saints from California to Utah, and essentially apostatized; instigated and profited from the Gold Rush of 1849; he was California's first millionaire; spent money to develop surrounding communities; in the 1870s ran into financial troubles and died in poverty.-Our Pioneer Heritage, 3:474 and American National Biography.Benjamin Harris Brewster: (13 October 1816-4 April 1888) Attorney-General of the United States; graduated from Princeton College, 1834; subsequently admitted to the Philadelphia bar; held minor federal post as Cherokee Indian claims settler, 1846; appointed attorney-general of Pennsylvania, 1867-1868; invited to join prosecution of the Star Route frauds of the Post Office Department, 1881; served as U.S. attorney-general in 1881-1884; retired in 1885.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume II.James Bridger: (17 March 1804-17 July 1881) Fur trapper and trader, explorer and scout; in 1822, Bridger joined William Ashley--s fur company and departed for the headwaters of the Missouri River; was probably the first non-native to view Yellowstone Park and the Great Salt Lake; with several partners, Bridger bought out Ashley in 1830 and formed the Rocky Mountain Fur Company; in 1838 he started a store in southwest Wyoming that came to be known as Fort Bridger; involved in relations with the Mormons, and known to many Indian tribes; he was discharged from Fort Laramie in 1865 as an army scout; returned to Missouri and died on his farm. -American National Biography.-American National Biography.John Calvin Brown: (6 January 1827-17 August 1889) Governor of Tennessee; began practicing law in Giles County, 1848; enlisted as a private in the Confederate Tennessee regiment at the start of the Civil War, rising to the position of division command; in 1869 he was elected to the state legislature; elected as governor in 1870; in 1876 he became vice-president of the Texas &​ Pacific Railroad, then president of the company in 1888.-American National Biography.James Buchanan: (23 April 1791-1 June 1868) Fifteenth president of the United States; served one term in the Pennsylvania legislature, 1814-1816; representative in the U.S. House of Representatives, 1821-1831; served as a Democrat in the U.S. Senate, 1834-1845; appointed as secretary of state by James K. Polk in 1845; named minister to Great Britain by Franklin Pierce in 1853; elected president of the United States in 1856 and served one term, but remained active in the political scene after Abraham Lincoln replaced him.-American National Biography.Thomas Bullock: (23 December 1816-10 February 1885) Mormon pioneer and clerk; as a clerk traveling to Utah with early Mormon pioneers, he made important observations of events, weather, distances, etc. commenced as staff member of the Deseret News in 1850; chief clerk of the Utah Territorial House of Representatives during several sessions, and in the Church Historians Office under Willard Richards and George A. Smith; moved to Summit County, Utah in 1868 and served as clerk of the probate court and county recorder.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 4:695.John T. Caine: (8 January 1829-20 September 1911) Fourth Congressional delegate from the territory of Utah; immigrated to the United States from England as a young man, 1846; joined the L.D.S. Church in New York City, 1847; became the general agent for the --œFrontier Guardian,-- the Kanesville, IA church newspaper, 1851; moved his family to Utah, 1852; called to serve a mission in the Hawaiian Islands, 1854; returned in 1856 and was elected as the assistant secretary of the territorial legislature; became a personal clerk to Brigham Young and influenced him to construct the Salt Lake Theatre and served as stage manager; went to Washington and served as assistant to William H. Hooper, Utah--s congressional delegate, 1870; served four terms on the Utah legislative assembly, 1874, 1876, 1880, 1882; elected to the U.S. Congress in 1883 and served five terms in all; defender of polygamy and greatly influential in pushing through the --œHome Rule-- bill in Congress to grant Utah statehood, 1892.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:726-38.John Caldwell Calhoun: (18 March 1782-30 March 1850) U.S. statesman, lawyer; elected to Congress, 1811; selected as President Monroe's secretary of war, 1817; served as vice-President under John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson, 1825-1829; dropped from Jackson--s ticket during the second election due to political differences; entered the U.S. Senate, 1832; appointed secretary of state under Polk, 1844; served again as a U.S. senator; hailing from South Carolina, he was known throughout his life as an ardent defender of slavery and states-- rights.-The Cambridge Biographical Encyclopedia.James Dawson Callery: (11 November 1857-May 1932) Street railway president, manufacturer; involved in the street railway business in Pittsburgh and Allegheny; served as chairman of the board of the Pittsburgh Railway Company and president of the Diamond National Bank; also belonged to the executive committee of the Philadelphia Co., Duquesne Light Company.-Who Was Who in America. Volume 1, 1897-1942.Simon Cameron: (8 March 1799-26 June 1889) U.S. senator, secretary of war, diplomat; appointed state printer of Pennsylvania and state adjutant-general, 1826; left editing to pursue enterprise in construction, railroad and banking, 1830-1838; elected to U.S. Senate as a Whig, 1845; accused of corruption during his subsequent term as an Indian claim adjustor; reelected to the Senate in 1856 as a Republican; appointed by Lincoln as secretary of war, 1861; sent as a diplomat to Russia after the War Department was tainted by scandal, 1862; reelected again to U.S. Senate, 1867 and 1873; retired from politics in 1877.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume II.Robert Lang Campbell: (21 January 1825-11 April 1872) Chief clerk in the Historian--s Office of the Mormon Church, professional educator; baptized in Scotland, 1842; labored as a local missionary from 1843-1845; migrated to Nauvoo, IL, and ordained a Seventy, 1845; involved in clerical work with Patriarch John Smith and Willard Richards; called to Great Britain mission, 1850, served four years; clerk at the Church Historian--s Office from 1854 until his death; elected secretary of the Deseret Agricultural and Manufacturing Society, 1856; appointed as a regent of Deseret University in 1857; elected superintendent of schools for Salt Lake county, 1860, and for Territory of Utah, 1862; served as chief clerk of the House of Representatives for the Utah legislature, 1872.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:613-614.George Q. Cannon: (11 January 1827-12 April 1901) Pioneer, editor, statesman, L.D.S. ecclesiastical leader; emigrated from England to join in the gathering of the church membership in Utah, 1847; called to serve in the Eastern States mission to improve relations with Congress and assist members who were gathering west, 1859-1860; became a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, 1860; elected as a delegate to the U.S. Senate in the summer of 1862; again selected as a delegate to Congress to help Utah achieve statehood, 1872, serving for four successive terms; became first counselor to President John Taylor, 1880; continued on in this position under the presidencies of Wilford Woodruff and Lorenzo Snow.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:42-51.Albert Carrington: (8 January 1813-19 September 1889) member of the Council of the Twelve Apostles; studied and practiced law in Pennsylvania; joined the L.D.S. Church in 1841; elected assessor and collector of the provisional state of Deseret, 1849; editor of the --œDeseret News,-- 1854- 1859 and 1863-1867; served on the territorial legislature from its organization until 1868; appointed mission President over the European Mission; ordained as an apostle, 1870; returned to the continent to preside over the European Mission from 1871-73, 1875-77, and 1880-82; became assistant counselor to the President of the Church; served as Brigham Young--s secretary; served a prison term from 4th to the 28th of August, 1879 for not complying with anti-polygamy laws; excommunicated from the Church, 1889, but renewed baptismal covenants before his death and died a member of the Church.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:126.Lewis Cass: (9 October 1782-17 June 1866) Political leader and presidential candidate; established a law practice in Ohio; simultaneously elected to the Ohio legislature and named federal marshal, 1806; ranked as a major general after his participation in the War of 1812; appointed governor of Michigan territory in 1813; chosen as Secretary of War in 1831 by President Andrew Jackson; named minister to France, 1836-1842; ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. presidency in 1844 and 1848; elected to the U.S. Senate in 1845 by Michigan; in 1857 President James Buchanan appointed him as Secretary of State, but Cass later resigned after a disagreement in policy.-American National Biography.Eugene Casserly: (13 November 1820-14 June 1883) Senator; admitted to the New York bar in 1844 and began to practice corporate law, 1846-1847; moved to San Francisco and became a newspaper editor; elected to the U.S. Senate from California in 1869.-Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography.William Henry Channing: (25 May 1810-23 December 1884) Unitarian clergyman, reformer, author; called to the pastorate of the Unitarian church, 1839; edited Unitarian newspaper, Western Messenger, 1841; left Unitarianism and became the leader of an independent religious society in New York, 1843-1845; joined various other religious groups, including Brook Farm and the Religious Union of Associationists, 1845-1854; left for England to fill various pastoral positions; returned to the U.S. during the Civil War and served as pastor of the Unitarian society, member of the Sanitation Commission, and Chaplain of the House of Representatives; expatriated to England for the remainder of his life.-Dictionary of American Biography.Volume III.Salmon P[ortland] Chase: (13 January 1808-7 May 1873) Jurist and statesman; became a lawyer in Cincinnati in 1830; acted as counsel for the defense of fugitive slaves; elected as Governor of Ohio, 1855-1859; served as Secretary of the Treasury, 1861-1864; appointed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1864 as Chief Justice of the U.S. presided at the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, 1868.-The Cambridge Biographical Encyclopedia.St. John Chrysostom: (344?-407) Christian saint; a presbyter in the city of Antioch during the 4th century, known for his scathing excoriations of Christians participating in Jewish practices and rituals; chosen by Thomas L. Kane as his patron saint.-John Chrysostom and the Jews.Rudger Clawson: (1 March 1857-21 June 1943) Member of the Council of the Twelve Apostles; as a young man was chosen as a private secretary to John W. Young, president of the Utah Western Railway company, 1875-1877; called as a missionary to the Southern States, 1879; brought to trial for polygamy in a widely publicized case under the Edmunds Act and was sentenced to four years in prison, of which he served three, 1884-1887.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:174.William Clayton: (17 July 1814- 4 December 1879) Chronicler of early Mormonism, pioneer, musician, and scribe; joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in England, 1837; emigrated to the United States, 1840; involved in recording Joseph Smith's 1843 revelation on plural marriage, and among the first to take another wife; headed west with the Saints in 1846 and was selected to join the advance company that reached Utah in July 1847; influential in the development of the --œroadometer;-- served a mission to England,1852-1853; served as treasurer of Zion--s Cooperative Mercantile Institution, a church-wide cooperative venture in Utah; appointed Territorial Recorder of Marks and Brands of Utah; also as Territorial clerk and auditor of public accounts.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:717 and American National Biography.Samuel Langhorne Clemens: (30 November 1835-21 April 1910) Humorist, novelist; better known by his pseudonym, Mark Twain; started as a printer's apprentice; wrote of his travels West, 1861 in his book Roughing It, which includes his visit to Salt Lake City; became famous after writing A Jumping Frog while in California, 1865; his 1869 book, The Innocents Abroad, made him a national figure; in later years he was known for many works, especially Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume II.Auguste Comte: (19 January 1798-5 September 1857) French philosopher; entered the École Polytechnique in 1814; worked with Henri de Rouvroy Comte de Saint Simon from 1817 to 1824; suffered a breakdown in 1826; produced his major work Course of Positive Philosophy, 1830-1842; known as a founder of sociology and positivist thought.-Encyclopedia of World Biography.John Constable: (c. 1800-c. 1880s) Uncle of Thomas L. Kane; married Thomas L. Kane--s aunt, Alida Van Rensselaer Kane; involved in financial transactions with members of the Kane family.Philip St. George Cooke: (13 Jun 1809-1895) Soldier and memoirist; graduated from West Point in 1827; joined the 6th Infantry on the Missouri frontier; fought in the Black Hawk War; marched with General Stephen Watts Kearny--s Army to Mexico in 1846; joined the Mormon Battalion that same year; after the Mexican War, he served as superintendent at Carlisle Barracks and commanded the 2nd Dragoons of Texas; commanded the cavalry in the Utah War of 1857; served as a Union cavalry general in the Civil War; retired in 1873.-The New Encyclopedia of the American West and Allibone's Critical Dictionary of English Literature: A Supplement. British and American Authors.James Cooper: (8 May 1810-28 March 1863) Lawyer, United States senator; admitted to Pennsylvania bar in 1834; served in the state legislature, 1844-1848; appointed state attorney general in 1848 by Governor Johnston but returned to the state legislature in 1849 and was selected as a U.S. senator the same year; served as a brigadier-general and commander in the Civil War.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume II.George W. Corner: (12 December 1889-28 September 1981) Author and physician; prominent doctor of anatomy, embryology, prolific writer; professor at Berkeley, Johns Hopkins, and University of Rochester Medical School, 1915-1940; Director of the Department of Embryology in the Carnegie Institution, 1940; official historian at the Rockefeller Institute in New York, 1956; Executive Officer of the American Philosophical Society, 1960; wrote a biography of Elisha Kent Kane, Dr. Kane of the Arctic Seas, 1972.-Contemporary Authors. Volume 102.Edgar Cowan: (19 September 1815-31 August 1885) U.S. senator; started a law practice in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, 1839; appointed as a presidential elector, 1860; elected to the U.S. Senate, 1861-1867; was appointed at the end of his term to be the minister to Austria under the Johnson administration.-Who Was Who in America. Historical Volume, 1607-1896.Alfred Cumming: (September 1802-8 October 1873) Second governor of the Territory of Utah, 1857-1861; served in 1836 as mayor of Augusta, Georgia; became General Scott--s assistant during the Mexican War; appointed as an Indian agent after the war; Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Missouri; entered the Salt Lake Valley with Colonel Albert Johnston--s army during the heated atmosphere of the Utah War, 1857; helped soothe relations between the U.S. government and the Mormon people and was able to serve despite the tense relations between church and state.-Heart Throbs of the West. Volume 6.Andrew Gregg Curtain: (22 April 1815-7 October 1894) Lawyer, politician, and diplomat; began a law practice in 1837; appointed secretary of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1854; served as governor of Pennsylvania from 1861 to 1867; became a member of the Republican party; known as --œthe Soldiers-- Friend-- for his support of Union armies in the Civil War; appointed in 1869 as minister to Russia; dissatisfied with President Ulysses S. Grant, Curtain became involved in Democratic election campaigns; elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1880, where he served until his retirement in 1887.-American National Biography.George William Curtis: (25 February 1824-31 August 1892) Writer, editor, orator; started a prominent career in New York journalism as the associate editor of Putnam's Monthly magazine and as writer of the --œEasy Chair-- column for Harper's New Monthly; became an active abolitionist and campaigner for the Republican party, 1856; chosen as the political editor of Harper's Weekly, 1863-1892; tried but was unsuccessful in receiving the nomination for U.S. senator from New York, 1866; appointed editor of the New York Times, 1869; again, he was politically unsuccessful in his run for the Republican nomination for the New York State governorship, 1870; appointed by President Grant to head a commission for civil-service reform, 1871-1873; took part in the formation of the Mugwumps, 1884.-American National Biography.George Mifflin Dallas: (10 July 1792-31 December 1864) Vice-President under James K. Polk from 1845-1849; son of Alexander J. Dallas, who had been Secretary of the Treasury, 1814-16; admitted to the bar, 1813; secretary to Albert Gallatin, Minister to Russia, from 1813 to 1814; solicitor for the United States Bank, 1815-1817; returned to Philadelphia and served as deputy attorney general in 1817, mayor in 1829, and U.S. district attorney for the eastern district of Pennsylvania, 1829-1831; served in the U.S. Senate from 1831 to 1833; appointed attorney general of Pennsylvania in 1833; minister to Russia, 1837-39; elected Vice-President under James K. Polk from 1845-1849; minister to Great Britain, 1856-1861.-The Vice-Presidents and Cabinet Members, 1:164-165.Jefferson Davis: (3 June 1808?-6 December 1889) President of the Confederate States of America and U.S. Senator; graduate of West Point; served six and a half years as an infantry lieutenant stationed in the West; won election to Congress in 1845; served as a colonel in the Mexican War; elected to the Senate in 1847; appointed Secretary of War in 1852 under President Franklin Pierce; reelected to the Senate in 1857; left the Union and was elected president of the Confederate States of America in 1860; for his secessionist activities, he was imprisoned for two years after the Civil War.-American National Biography.Columbus Delano: (5 June 1809-23 October 1896) Congressman and Secretary of the Interior; admitted to the Ohio bar in 1831; elected as county prosecutor in 1832; elected to Congress as a Whig, 1844; left politics to enter the banking sector in New York in 1850; served briefly as commissary general for Ohio troops at the beginning of the Civil War; in 1863 was elected to the Ohio General Assembly and chaired the Judicial Committee; reelected in 1864 to the U.S. Congress; appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant to be Commissioner of Internal Revenue in 1869; made Secretary of the Interior in 1870; resigned in 1875.-American National Biography.William Elder: (23 July 1806-5 April 1899) Physician and writer; established a medical practice in Pennsylvania, 1833; studied law and admitted to the bar in 1842; wrote for various publications on issues including abolition, finance, commerce, taxation, and public wealth; authored a biography of Elisha Kent Kane, 1857; employed as statistician for the Treasury Department in Washington, 1861- 1866; returned to Philadelphia after the Civil War and continued to write on economic subjects; spent the last 12 years of his life as a clerk in the Comptroller--s Office in the Treasury Department.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume III.Ralph Waldo Emerson: (25 May 1803-27 April 1882) Lecturer and author; studied theology and divinity at Harvard University, 1825-1826; ordained a junior pastor of the Second Church of Boston, 1829; began his career as a lecturer and author, publishing Nature, a work addressing the new philosophy of Transcendentalism, 1835-1836; organized the Transcendental Club, 1836-1839; published the Dial, a transcendentalist journal, 1840-1842; recognized as a major scholar after publication of Essays, 1841, and Essays: Second Series, 1844; departed to Britain for a lecture series, 1846-1848; published Poems, 1847; named honorary doctor of laws by Harvard University, 1866; continued as prolific writer and lecturer, concerned with philosophy and reform issues, for the remainder of his life.-American National Biography.Samuel Field: (12 August 1823-?) Philanthropist and Philadelphian merchant; served as a ruling elder of the Walnut street Presbyterian church; belonged to the Presbyterian Board of Education; helped establish hospitals, homes for widows, and orphanages.-Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography.Millard Fillmore: (7 January 1800-8 March 1874) Thirteenth President of the United States; he began his career as a lawyer, entering politics as a member of the Anti-Masonic movement in New York State; elected to the state assembly, 1828; elected to Congress, 1832; a helping founder of the Whigs, he rode the party platform to Congress and served for three terms, 1836-1842; appointed Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, 1842; defeated in the gubernatorial election of New York, 1844; elected state comptroller, 1847; selected as Zachary Taylor--s Vice President, 1849; replaced Taylor upon his death in 1850; lost his second-term election, 1852, but was picked up as the Presidential candidate for the Know-Nothing party, 1856; exiting from politics, he devoted the rest of his life to philanthropic work.-American National Biography.Hamilton Fish: (3 August 1808-7 September 1893) Lawyer and Secretary of State; passed the New York bar in 1830; an active Whig, he won election in 1842 to the U.S. House of Representatives; elected lieutenant governor in 1847; in 1848 elected governor; entered the U.S. Senate in 1851; retreated from politics in 1857; during the Civil War, he served as head of New York's Union Defense Committee; appointed Secretary of State by President Ulysses S. Grant; retired from political life at the end of Grant--s presidency and served as president of the Society of Cincinnati, the St. Nicolas Society, the New-York Historical Society, the Union League Club, and on Columbia University's board of trustees.-American National Biography.Jacob [H.] Forney: (1829-1865) Indian official; appointed by President Buchanan as Superintendent of Indian Affairs, 1857; investigated the Mountain Meadows Massacre and retrieved several children orphaned in the incident; negotiated peace between the Mormons and the Snake and Shoshone tribes; helped Col. Johnston during the --œUtah-- war by finding him Indians to serve as scouts; tried to start Indian farms to help Indians alleviate their hunger; served as Indian agent until 1860 when he returned to Pennsylvania.-Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography.John Forsyth: (22 October 1780-21 October 1841) Politician and diplomat; started his law practice in Georgia, 1802; appointed state attorney-general, 1808; elected to Congress as a Republican, 1813; designated as chairman of the Committee of Foreign Relations, 1814-1818; appointed to fill a vacant seat in the U.S. Senate, 1819; resigned and became the U.S. ambassador to Spain, 1819-1823; reelected to Congress, 1824; elected as governor of Georgia, 1827; reentered the U.S. Senate on another vacant seat, 1829; appointed by Jackson as Secretary of State, 1834; continued to serve as Secretary of State for the Van Buren administration; died shortly after his retirement.-American National Biography.Frederick Fraley: (28 May 1804-23 September1901) Merchant; entered the law profession in Philadelphia; founder and treasurer of the Franklin Institute, 1824; served on the city council, 1834-1837; elected as a Whig to the state senate in 1837 and was chairman of the investigative committee of the --œBuck-shot war;-- served as a director of Girard College, 1847; helped to found the Union League of Philadelphia; served as a delegate to the National Board of Trade formation committee; he was a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania, 1853-1880; became the president of the American Philosophical Society, 1879.-Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography.Sir John Franklin: (16 April 1786-11 June 1847) British naval officer; led several expeditions aimed to map the Arctic region, 1818-1827; published Narrative of a Journey to the Shores of the Polar Sea in the Years, 1819-1820; chosen as commander of the Erebus and embarked on an expedition to find the Northwest Passage in the Arctic Sea; during the expedition, the ship was lost and the entire crew perished, 1847.-The McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of World Biography.Lucy Page Gaston: (1869-20 August 1924) Reformer; helped found the Illinois State Normal School; became a member of the Anti-Cigarette League of America and the Women--s Christian Temperance Union; she was involved in court cases to test the viability of prohibition laws in Illinois; pushed for increased anti-cigarette legislation; edited the Anti-Cigarette Herald.-Who Was Who in America. Volume I, 1897-1942.John W. Geary: (30 December 1819-8 February1873) Governor of Pennsylvania; worked in Kentucky as a civil engineer; active in the Pennsylvania Militia; volunteered in the Mexican War; appointed Postmaster of San Francisco in 1849 by President Polk; voted in as a judge of the San Francisco district; returned to Pennsylvania in 1852; left to serve as Territorial Governor of Kansas, 1856; fought in many battles of the Civil War; elected in 1866 as Governor of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.-Encyclopedia of American Biography.William Gilpin: (4 October 1815-19 January 1894) Geopolitician, soldier, and land speculator; a seasoned soldier of the Seminole and Mexican Wars, he used his influence and know-how to practice land law, write treatises, and publicize the American West, 1841-1861; supporter of the Democratic party and editor of the Missouri Daily Argus, c. 1850s; participated in John C. Fremont's expedition to the Oregon Territory, 1842; planned and laid out communities in Independence, Missouri, and Portland, Oregon; joined Republican party, c. 1856-1859; appointed as first territorial governor of Colorado, 1861-1862.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume IV.Heber J. Grant: (22 November 1856-14 May 1945) Seventh president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; in 1876, he began an insurance business, eventually becoming president of the Utah Home Fire Insurance Co. and of Zion's Cooperative Mercantile Institution; served on the City Council of Salt Lake City and in the territorial legislature; called to the Council of the Twelve, 1882; served a mission to Japan, 1901-1903; president of the European mission, 1904-1906; became President of the Church, 1918-1945.-Who Was Who in America. Volume II, 1943-1950.Jedediah Morgan Grant: (21 February 1816-1 December 1856) Second counselor to President Brigham Young; baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1833; emigrated to Utah, 1846; he became the first mayor of Salt Lake City in 1851; wrote letters with Thomas Kane to the New York Herald to protest charges made by the territorial officials against the Mormons in Utah; selected as Speaker of the House of the territorial legislature of Utah, 1852; ordained as an apostle and chosen to serve as the second counselor to Brigham Young, 1854; during the Mormon Reformation of 1856, he toured from city to city, excoriating the Saints with powerful orations of repentance and commitment.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:56.Ulysses Simpson Grant: (27 April 1822-23 July 1885) Union army general and president of the United States; received a commission to West Point, 1839; fought under Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott during the Mexican War and was promoted to the rank of brevet captain, 1845-1847; he became a Union hero during the Civil War, helping to win significant victories at Forts Henry and Donelson, 1862, Vicksburg and Gettysburg, 1863; became a three-star general and appointed by Lincoln as the general-in-chief of all Union forces, 1863; accepted surrender of General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House, 1865; promoted to rank of four star general, 1866; appointed by Johnson as the --œinterim-- secretary of war after Edwin Stanton's resignation, 1867; served two terms as President of the United States as a Republican, 1868 and 1872; ran unsuccessfully for the Republican nomination in 1880; wrote Personal Memoirs just before his death, 1885.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume IV.Horace Greeley: (3 February 1811-29 November 1872) Newspaper editor and political figure; founded The New-Yorker with Jonas Winchester, 1834; began publication of the daily New York Tribune; became a political commentator, writing editorials condemning slavery, opposing the Mexican War, and advocating westward expansion; elected to the House of Representatives, 1848-1849; embarked on a journey across the United States, reporting on such western issues as Native Americans, the Mormons, and the transcontinental railroad; interviewed Mormon leader, Brigham Young, 1859; called for peace on the eve of Civil War, 1861; tried to negotiate an early peace settlement in Niagara Falls, Canada, 1864; wrote The American Conflict, a history of the Civil War, 1864 and 1866; advocated post-war universal suffrage and amnesty; nominated as the Presidential candidate for the Liberal Republicans and Democratic parties, 1872; died shortly after the election.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume IV.Caspar Rene Gregory: (6 November 1846-9 April 1917) New Testament scholar; studied at the Princeton Theological Seminary, 1870-1873; departed for Europe where he remained for 33 years and taught at Leipzig University; finished the final edition of Tischendorf's --œGreek New Testament with Prolegomena,-- 1884; named Privatdocent, 1884; auserordentlicher Professor, 1889; and ordentlicher Honorarprofessor, 1891; served on the front lines of the German army as a grave registerer during World War I; died in combat, 1917.-Dictionary of American Biography.Gilbert Hovey Grosvenor: (28 October 1875-4 February 1966) Editor and naturalist; taught languages, history, and mathematics at Englewood (N.J.) Academy; in 1899 accepted position of editorial assistant at the National Geographic Magazine; elected president of the society in 1920.-Dictionary of American Biography. Supplement VIII.James H. Hart: (21 June 1825-12 November 1906) Ecclesiastical leader for the Church of Jesus Christ of Later-day Saints in the Northeast U.S. joined the church in England, c. 1851; emigrated to the United States and became the President of the St. Louis Stake, 1855-1857; called as financial agent of Brigham Young in the St. Louis district; served as the Emigrant Agent for the Church in New York, 1881-1888; in 1883, he was called to oversee the church in the states of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.-Mormon in Motion: the Life and Journals of James H. Hart, 1825-1906.Samuel Gilbert Hathaway: (18 July 1780-2 May 1867) Congressman; served as justice of the peace in Cincinnatus, N.Y., 1810-1858; elected to the New York Assembly, 1814, and in 1822 became a member of the New York Senate; served as a major general in the New York Militia, 1832-1858; elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, 1833-1835; appointed as a Democratic presidential elector, 1852; served as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention, 1860.-Who Was Who in America. Historical Volume, 1607-1896.William H. Hooper: (25 December 1813-30 December 1882) Second Congressional delegate from the territory of Utah; born in Maryland, became a merchant, and moved to Utah in 1850 after a stint as a riverboat captain; became a member of the Utah legislature and secretary of the Territory; elected as the Utah delegate to Congress, 1862; served for five terms; was an ardent defender of polygamy before the U.S. legislature; also served as President of ZCMI, 1877.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:724-26.Dimick Baker Huntington: (26 May 1808-1 February 1879) member of the Mormon Battalion, Indian interpreter; became a member of the L.D.S. church in his youth; helped to settle the city of Provo in Utah; in 1853 he was asked to settle the aftermath of the massacre of Captain Gunnison and his party in southern Utah; helped negotiate the terms of the treaty that ended the Black Hawk War, 1868.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 4:748.Oliver Boardman Huntington: (14 October 1823-7 February 1907 or January1909) Mormon pioneer and missionary; convert to the Church in 1835; followed the Saints to Kirtland and Adamondi- Ahman; present during hostilities in Missouri; mission to New York, 1843; knew the Prophet Joseph Smith, and his son Joseph Smith III; served a mission to England in 1846; moved to Utah in 1852, settled in Springville; explored a route to Carson Valley in 1853; mission to Indians, 1855; taught school.-Mormon Manuscripts to 1846 and Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies.Orson Hyde: (8 January 1805-28 November 1878) Apostle of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints, 1835-1878, and president of the quorum from 1847-1875; during his ecclesiastical service he filled to England and Palestine and assisted in many Mormon settlements in Utah and the Rocky Mountain West; editor of the Frontier Guardian; helped with the settlement of Kanesville, UT, 1846- 51; he was also a member of the Utah territorial legislature.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:80.Charles Jared Ingersoll: (3 October 1782-14 May 1862) Attorney, author, and Congressman; admitted to Pennsylvania bar in 1802; wrote pamphlets in defense of American culture; entered politics as a U.S. Congressman, 1812; appointed U.S. District Attorney for Philadelphia in 1815; served one term in the Pennsylvania assembly, 1830-1831; elected in 1840 to Congress as a Democrat, serving there until 1849; in 1853 was appointed U.S. judge for the district of Connecticut.-American National Biography.Alfred Iverson: (3 December 1798-4 March 1873) U.S. senator, Confederate general; practiced law in Columbus, Georgia; served in the state legislature; appointed a judge in the superior court for the Columbus circuit; in 1844 became a presidential elector; won a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, 1846; served in the U.S. Senate, 1855 to 1861; when joining with his state, he withdrew from the Union; during the Civil war was promoted to rank of brigadier-general in the Confederate Army.-Appleton--s Cyclopaedia of American Biography.Antoine Ivins: (11 May 1881-18 October 1967) Member of the First Council of the Seventy, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; dealt in the agriculture and livestock business, 1909-1921; ran a church-owned sugar plantation in Hawaii from 1921 until 1931 when he was called to preside over the Mexican Mission, 1931-1934; sustained a member of the First Council of the Seventy, 1931-1967.-Who Was Who in America. Volume V, 1969-1973.Albert Sidney Johnston: (2 February 1803-6 April 1862), Confederate general; graduated from West Point in 1826; fought in the Black Hawk War of 1832; attracted to the Texas Revolution of 1836, and rose to leadership positions in the Texas Republic; resigned from the Texas army in 1840; served with distinction in the Mexican War; accepted position of paymaster in the U.S. army in 1849; in 1854 was appointed colonel over the Second U.S. Calvary Regiment; commanded his army against the Mormons in the Utah War of 1857-1858; upon learning that Texas had seceded, Johnston returned to Virginia and was appointed a full Confederate general; died in the midst of battle with Union armies.-American National Biography.George Washington Julian: (5 May 1817-7 July 1899) Abolitionist leader; admitted to the Indiana bar in 1840; elected as a Whig to the state legislature, 1845; entered the U.S. Congress in 1848 on the Free-soil ticket; helped organize the Republican party and served four terms in the U. S. Congress, 1860-1869; published several political essays and speeches, 1870-1884; appointed as surveyor-general of New Mexico, 1885-1889; was a life-long crusader for abolition, women--s suffrage, and other reforms.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume V.Elias Kent Kane: (7 June 1794-12 December 1835) Senator, cousin of John Kintzing Kane; studied law and practiced in Nashville, Tennessee; moved to Illinois territory in 1815 and became a delegate to the state constitutional convention in 1818; served as the first secretary of state and later in the state legislature; elected to the U.S. Senate as a Jacksonian Democrat for two terms, 1825 until his death.-Appleton--s Cyclopaedia of American Biography and The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography. Volume 11.Elisha Kent Kane: (3 February 1820-16 February 1857) Naval officer, physician, explorer, son of John Kintzing Kane and brother of Thomas Leiper Kane; attended University of Virginia, 1838- 1839; transferred after an illness and graduated from the medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, 1842; assigned position of assistant surgeon in the U.S. Navy and left on a naval mission to China; in 1850, he joined the U.S. Coast guard Expedition in search of Arctic explorer, Sir John Franklin; led the Second Grinnell Expedition to the Arctic and became a national hero, saving his crew from death despite great odds, 1853-1855; died in Havana at age 37.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume V.Elisha Kent Kane: (19 April 1902-ca. 1978) Lawyer, Lieutenant Commander in the Navy, politician, and grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth Kane; trained in the law; married three times; visited Utah on several occasions at the request of LDS leaders; served in World War II; researched his grandfather--s life; served on the Pennsylvania State Legislature; his correspondence ends in 1978.---œElder Frank Evans.--Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood [Kane]: (12 May 1836-29 May 1909) Physician, teacher, prohibitionist, philanthropist, wife of Thomas L. Kane, and daughter of William Wood; immigrated to America, 1844; married Thomas in 1853; educated in medicine; cared for neighbors and even broke through rebel lines in the Civil War to administer to her husband--s wounds; traveled to Utah with Thomas, 1872; wrote of her experiences in Utah in Twelve Mormon Homes; an avid photographer; finished her M.D. degree in the 1880s; undertook a class in the Presbyterian Sunday School; was a prohibitionist leader in the Women--s Christian Temperance Union; assisted with the hospital in Kane, PA.-Story of John Kane.Harriet Amelia Kane: (10 July 1854-9 January 1896) Physician, daughter of Thomas L. and Elizabeth W. Kane; graduated in medicine in 1885; practiced medicine with her brothers in Kane, PA; retired early from medicine as her strength failed; devoted the rest of her life to working with her mother; together they spent their time in temperance and religious philanthropic work.John Kintzing Kane: (16 May 1795-21 February 1858) Jurist, father of Elisha Kent Kane, Robert Patterson Kane, and Thomas Leiper Kane; graduated from Yale College, 1814; passed the bar in 1817; appointed city solicitor of Philadelphia, 1829-1830; served as claim settler under the convention of 1831 with France, 1832-1836; became a political advisor to Andrew Jackson; appointed attorney-general of Pennsylvania, 1845, but resigned to accept position as judge of the U.S. district court for the eastern district of Pennsylvania, where he presided until his death.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume V.Margaret Fox (Kane): (1833?-8 March 1893) Spiritualist; elder of the --œFox Sisters-- in Hydeville, NY, which claimed to be in communication with spirits by means of rappings; toured the U.S. and Europe giving demonstrations; discredited by scientists; claimed to have been common-law wife of Elisha Kent Kane, bore his name after his death, and published The Love Life of Dr. Kane in 1866.-American Biographies and Allibone's Critical Dictionary of English Literature: A Supplement. British and American Authors.Robert Patterson Kane: (9 June 1827-28 November 1906) Lawyer, son of John Kintzing Kane, and brother of Thomas L. Kane; began practicing law in Philadelphia with his father; served at times as district attorney; had a large private practice; served with the First City Troop in General Patterson--s cavalry in 1861.Thomas Leiper Kane: (27 January 1822-26 December 1883) Soldier, son of John Kintzing Kane and brother of Elisha Kent Kane; pursued his education in Philadelphia, England, and France, admitted to bar in 1846; employed as a clerk under his father in the U.S. district court for the eastern Pennsylvania district; served as Chairman of the Free-Soil State Central Committee, 1848, and behind the scenes, acted as agent of the Underground Railroad; became a political advocate for the Mormons and was a personal friend to Brigham Young; served as lieutenant-colonel of the Pennsylvania Bucktail Regiment during the Civil War; rose to rank of major general for his gallant and meritorious service; after the war was involved in various business ventures and charitable organizations.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume V.Stephen W. Kearny: (30 August 1794-31 October 1848) Soldier; served as an officer in the War of 1812; assisted in exploring the trans-Mississippi region in 1819; when the Mexican War started, he was commissioned by President Polk to raise an army to conquer New Mexico and California; appointed Captain James Allen to organize the Mormon Battalion; conquered New Mexico and California and established provisional governments; served briefly as military governor of Veracruz and Mexico City.-New Encyclopedia of the American West.Clara Louise Kellogg: (12 July 1842-13 May 1916) Dramatic soprano; studied music in New York City; debuted as Gilda in Verdi's rigoletto, at the Academy of music in New York, 1861; she was world-renowned for her portrayal of the heroine in Faust and made her London debut in 1867; went on a tour of the United States, singing Italian opera, 1868-1873; tried to excite America about French and Italian opera sung in English; toured throughout Europe until she married in 1887; retired to her home in Connecticut; wrote Memoires of an American Prima Donna, 1913.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume V.Heber C. Kimball: (14 June 1801-22 June 1868) First counselor to Brigham Young, 1847-1868, ordained as Apostle of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1833; among the first Mormon missionaries in England in 1837; served as lieutenant governor of the provisional state of Deseret, 1847-1868; member and President of the Legislative Council; traveled to oversee various Mormon settlements in Utah.-People in History.Horatio King: (21 June 1811-20 May 1897) Postmaster-general; worked his way to become editor and owner of the Paris, Me., Jeffersonian; in 1839, he was appointed clerk in the post-office department in Washington, D.C., first assistant postmaster-general in 1854, then as postmastergeneral in 1861; became secretary of the Monument society in 1881, helping with the Washington monument.-Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography and American Authors and Books.Louis Kossuth: (10 September 1802-20 March 1894) Hungarian statesman and orator; practiced law, 1823-1832; spent time in the national Diet at Porzony, Pressburg, Bratislava; he advocated change in Hungary's economy, politics, and society, and the termination of its subordination to Vienna; spent 1837-1840 in prison for his outspoken views; published the Pesti Hirlap (Pest Journal) to arouse public support for civil liberties and national independence; became minister of finance after the Hungarian Revolution; fled Hungary in 1849 when Russia intervened in Hungary; campaigned for Hungarian independence; died in Italy.-The McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of World Biography.John D. Lee: (12 September 1812-11 September 1876) Private secretary to Brigham Young; colonist of several areas in southern Utah; Indian agent; involved in the Mountain Meadows Massacre, the murder of a party of Arkansan emigrants in southern Utah by a posse of Mormon men and Indians, 1857; tried, convicted, and executed for the killings, 1876.-American National BiographyJesse C. Little: (26 September 1815-26 December 1893) Second counselor to Bishop Edward Hunter; joined the Church in the East and became president of the mission in the New England and Middle States in 1846; met Thomas L. Kane at a Mormon conference in Philadelphia, 1846; served for a short time in the Mormon Battalion; appointed as chief engineer of the Salt Lake City Fire Department, 1856; served as second counselor to Bishop Hunter from 1856-1874.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:242-43.Edward Livingston: (28 May 1764-23 May 1836) Lawyer and politician; served three terms in the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican, 1794-1799; returned to state politics as U.S. attorney for the District of New York and mayor of New York, 1801; he resigned from both positions after assuming responsibility for the theft of tax funds by a law clerk from the attorney's office, 1803; reentered law practice in Louisiana Territory, 1804; elected to U.S. House of Representatives, 1822-1829; elected to the U.S. Senate, 1829; appointed as Secretary of State under Jackson, 1831; resigned to accept post as foreign minister to France, 1833-1835; petitioned for French reparation payments from the treaty of 1831 (John Kintzing Kane served as lawyer on the treaty); forced to return home, 1835.-American National Biography.Mrs. Calista V. Luther: Writer; authored The Vintons and the Karens (Boston: 1881).-Allibone's Critical Dictionary of English Literature: A Supplement. British and American Authors.George Archibald McCall: (16 March 1802-26 February 1868) West Point graduate; started military career in Florida during the Seminole War, serving as aide-de-camp to Colonel Edmund P. Gaines; fought in the Mexican war and attained the rank of brevet lieutenant colonel; after a tour of Europe, he was promoted to staff rank of colonel in the army; retired from duty, 1853; reactivated as a volunteer with the outbreak of the Civil War, 1861; appointed brigadier general of the U.S. volunteers by Lincoln, 1861; commanded the --œPennsylvania Reserves;-- taken prisoner, June 1862; released, August 1862; resigned, 1863.-Generals in Blue; Lives of the Union Commanders.Samuel Vaughan Merrick: (4 May 1801-18 August 1870) Manufacturer and railroad executive; established the Southwark Foundry for heavy manufacturing, 1836, and expanded his operations into naval construction, 1852-1860; elected to the City Council of Philadelphia, c. 1832-1837; promoter, president, and director of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 1846-52; president of the Sunbury &​ Erie Railroad, 1856-57; elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1833; served as president of the Franklin Institute, 1842-1854; involved in philanthropy in the Southern states.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume VI.D.D. Mitchell: (31 July 1806-31 May 1861) Fur trader, Indian agent; joined the Upper Missouri Outfit in 1830; placed in charge of fur trading posts on the upper Missouri; became a partner in the company in 1835; served occasionally as Superintendent of Indian affairs at St. Louis, 1841-1852; served in the Mexican War; promoted the Fort Laramie Peace Council; helped organize the Missouri and California Overland Mail and Transportation Company, 1855, and was president for a time.-Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography.Robert B. Mitchell: (c. mid-1800s) Indian subagent; during 1846 and 1847, he was stationed at Trader--s Point, across from Winter Quarters; one of many Indian subagents, he was directly responsible for only the Pottawattomie; mediated between James Allen, Brigham Young, and the United States government over the right of Mormons to temporarily stay on Pottawattomie lands; saw to it that Mormons were secured this temporary right; concerned over relations between Indians and Mormons; went on to become a brigadier general in the Civil War.-Mormons at the Missouri.George Henry Moore: (20 April 1823-5 May 1892) Librarian, historian, bibliographer; appointed librarian of the New York Historical Society, 1849; known for his research in the colonial and revolutionary periods of American history; contributed to New York newspapers; served as secretary of the Mexican Boundary Commission, 1850; resigned at the New York Historical Society and to become head of the Lenox Library, 1872-1892.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume VII.Lucretia Mott: (3 January 1793-11 November 1880) Abolitionist and feminist; worked as a teacher's assistant at a Quaker school in New York; an abolitionist speaker in demand, she attended and helped organize the First Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women in 1837; became a partner with Elizabeth Cady Stanton in advocating women's rights in the U.S. chaired the annual meeting of the American Equal Rights Association in 1869; joined Susan B. Anthony and Stanton in forming the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1869; led various peace unions and societies.---œAt Home with Lucretia Mott--The American Scholar and American National Biography.John Norvell: (21 December 1789-24 April 1850) U.S. Senator; admitted to the Maryland bar, 1814; served as private in the War of 1812; edited an Anti-Federalist newspaper in Philadelphia, 1816-1832; relocated to Michigan territory and became postmaster of Detroit, 1831-1836; served as delegate to the Michigan Constitutional Convention, 1837; elected member of the U.S. Senate, 1837-1841; elected to the Michigan House of Representatives, 1842; served as U.S. district attorney for Michigan, 1846-1849.-Who Was Who in America. Historical Volume, 1607-1896.James Lawerence Orr: (12 May 1822-5 May 1873) Speaker of the House of Representatives, governor of South Carolina, Confederate States senator; elected to Congress, 1848; as a political moderate, he defended southern issues such as states rights and slavery, but advocated preservation of the Union; elected Speaker of the House, 1857; with outbreak of the Civil War, supported secession and became a Confederate States senator, 1861-1865; in 1865, he was elected as the first post-war governor of South Carolina; advocated acceptance of the new role of blacks in southern politics; after governorship became a circuit judge; appointed as minister to Russia during the Grant administration, 1872; died while in office.-American National Biography.Eli S. Parker: (1828-1895) Military officer, government official, and Native American; served with General Grant as a Staff Officer; earned the rank of general; Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1869- 1871.-Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the United States.Joseph Parrish: (1779-1840) Eminent Philadelphia physician; author of Practical Observations on Strangulated Hernia.-A Dictionary of American Authors.William Wines Phelps: (17 February 1792-7 March 1872) Newspaperman, publisher, composer; baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1831, and was called as a missionary to Native Americans; excommunicated, 1839; rebaptized, 1841; served a mission to the Eastern States, 1841; assisted Church historian Willard Richards in preparing a history of the church; traveled to Utah with exodus of the Saints, 1846-1847; helped organize the provisional state of Deseret and was appointed surveyor-general and chief engineer, 1849; elected to the Utah legislature, 1851-1857; published the Utah Almanac, c. 1850s-1860s; chosen as the chaplain of the lower house of the Utah legislature, 1859 and 1864; served as notary public in Salt Lake City.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia and American National Biography.Wendell Phillips: (9 November 1811-3 February 1884) Orator, abolitionist, women's rights and labor advocate; Phillips entered the national scene by his spontaneous rebuttal of a pro-slavery orator in a meeting at Fanueil Hall in Boston, 1837; served on the executive committee of the American Anti-Slavery Society; wrote several abolitionist tracts calling for northern secession from the Union; during the Civil War and post-Civil War periods was an ardent crusader for emancipation and civil rights for blacks; became a Massachusetts gubernatorial candidate on the Workingman's and Temperance party tickets, 1870.-American National Biography.Isaac Pierson: (15 August 1770-22 September 1833) U.S. Congressman; graduated from Princeton in 1789; awarded a fellowship with the College of Surgeons and Physicians of New York; practiced medicine for forty years; was a Representative from New Jersey in Congress, 1827-1831.-Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the United States.James K[nox] Polk: (2 November 1795-15 June 1849) U.S. statesman and eleventh President of the U.S., 1845-1849; admitted to the bar in 1820; elected to Congress as a Jacksonian Democrat in 1825; served as Speaker of the House between 1835 and 1839; elected Governor of Tennessee, 1839; in 1844 he ran for the U.S. presidency and once elected, fulfilled all his campaign promises, including: a reduction of the tariff, the annexation of Texas, ending the Oregon border dispute with Great Britain, and maintaining a moderate stance on the hot topic of slavery; during his presidency, he negotiated the United States-- annexation of Texas in 1845; went to war with Mexico in 1848 and gained the territories of California and New Mexico in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo; set the Oregon border at the 49th parallel; helped push the Wilmot Proviso through Congress, which ensured that any territory gained from Mexico would remain free; and passed a bill lowering the tariff in 1846.-The Cambridge Biographical Encyclopedia.Orson Pratt: (19 September 1811-3 October 1881) Member of the Council of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1835-1881; was one of the first Mormons to enter the Salt Lake Valley in 1847; helped survey the area; writer of numerous doctrinal tracts; appointed president of the branches of the church in England, Scotland, Wales, and England, 1848-1850; elected member of the Salt Lake legislative assembly, 1850; publicly announced the L.D.S. doctrine of polygamy, 1852; served a mission to England to supervise a reprinting of the Book of Mormon; self-taught student of mathematics and astronomy, lecturer to scientific societies of Utah.-American National Biography.Parley Parker Pratt: (12 April 1802-13 May 1857) Member of the Council of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; joined the Mormon church, 1830; ordained as an apostle in the Council of the Twelve Apostles, 1835; served as a missionary to England and began publication of the Millennial Star, 1840-1842; presided over the church in the Eastern states, 1845- 1847; traveled west with the main body of the church, 1847; he was a delegate to the constitutional convention for the provisional state of Deseret; elected as a senator to the General Assembly and later to the territorial legislature of Utah; served a mission to the Pacific Isles and South America, 1851-1855; upon his return in 1856, he was appointed chaplain in the legislative council at the State House in Fillmore City, UT; after entering into a plural marriage, he was killed in Arkansas by his new wife--s disgruntled ex-husband, 1857; his Autobiography was published in 1874.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:87, and Utah: The Right Place.Eli Kirk Price: (20 July 1797-15 November 1884) Lawyer and law reformer; worked in a shipping business; admitted to the bar in 1822; became an expert in equity and real property law; served in the Pennsylvania state senate, 1854-1856; worked to improve the law; member of the American Philosophical Society; founder of the Philadelphia Museum of Art; involved with the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting Indian Committee.-Dictionary of American Biography, 8:211-212.Josiah Quincy: (15 October 1859-8 September 1919) Mayor of Boston; joined the Republican party and was involved in the Mugwump revolt, c. 1880s; turning his back on the Republicans, he joined the Democratic party and was subsequently elected to the Massachusetts General Court, 1885; became chairman of the Democratic State Committee, 1891-1892, and publicity director for the Democratic national committee during the candidacy of Grover Cleveland; appointed as assistant secretary of state; elected mayor of Boston, 1895 and 1897; defeated in gubernatorial race, 1901; he was a member of the Boston Transit Commission and served as director of the Quincy and Boston Street Railway Company.-American National Biography.John Aaron Rawlins: (13 February 1831-6 September 1869) Army officer and Secretary of War; born in a poor family, limited opportunities for education; studied law and began practicing in Galena, Illinois, in 1855; elected city attorney, 1857; served on the staff of General Grant during the Civil War; rose through the ranks to the position of brigadier general, serving under General Grant's supervision; made Secretary of War when Grant became President, and served from March 1869 until his death.-American National Biography.George Reynolds: (1 January 1842-9 August 1909) One of the presidents of the Quorum of the Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; baptized into the Church as a young man in England, 1856; emigrated to Utah in 1865 and later became Brigham Young--s secretary; elected to the Utah legislature, 1869; returned as a missionary to the European Mission, 1869-1872; lost a petition to the Supreme Court in protest of anti-polygamy laws, thus intensifying the prosecution against Mormons for polygamy, 1879; in prison for polygamy, 1879-1881; called to the presidency of the First Quorum of the Seventy, 1890-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:206; 4:685.Willard Richards: (24 June 1804-11 March 1854) Second Counselor to Brigham Young, 1847-1854; joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1836; served a mission in England, 1837- 1839; present at the martyrdom of the prophet Joseph Smith, 1844; ordained a member of the Council of the Twelve Apostles, 1840; served as secretary of the State of Deseret and the Territory of Utah; presided over the Utah legislative assembly; worked as postmaster of the Salt Lake Valley; editor of the Deseret News.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:53.John D. Rockefeller: (8 July 1839-23 May 1937) American oil magnate and philanthropist; he and his family are famous for their wealth and philanthropic pursuits.-Benét's Reader's Encyclopedia.Orrin Porter Rockwell: (25 June 1815-9 June 1878) Early friend of Joseph Smith, Jr. joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1831; became Joseph Smith--s bodyguard, and upon Smith--s murder, traveled west to Utah with the main body of the Saints; scout; operated a mail station in the territory; served as deputy marshal of Salt Lake City; was a close associate of Brigham Young.-Orrin Porter Rockwell: Man of God, Son of Thunder.Mary Pauline Root: (1859-c. 1910s) Physician; graduated with a Doctor of Medicine degree from the Woman--s Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1883; completed post-graduate work in Philadelphia, 1884, and in New York, 1904-1906; studied as an intern at the Philadelphia Hospital, 1883-1884; as a medical missionary, she managed the Woman's Hospital in Madura, South India, 1885-1891; served as resident physician at Smith College, 1906-June 1909 and at the Bennett School, Millbrook N.Y., Oct. 1909-.-Who Was Who in America. Volume IV, 1961-1968.Peter Frederick Rothermel: (8 July 1817-15 August 1895) Artist; in 1847 he became a director of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and endeavored to raise the standard of education; completed his masterpiece, --œThe Battle of Gettysburg,-- in 1871 and contributed to other main exhibitions, including the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, 1876.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume VIII.Richard Rush: (29 August 1780-30 July 1859) Statesman and diplomat; in 1814, appointed U.S. Attorney General by President Madison; wrote American Jurisprudence, an essay proclaiming the supremacy of the U.S. justice system, 1815; chosen as the foreign minister to Britain during the Adams administration, 1817-1825; resigned to assume position as Secretary of the Treasury, 1825-1828; chosen as John Quincy Adams-- vice-presidential running-mate, 1828; in an about-face, became a Jacksonian supporter and joined the Democratic Party in 1832; served as legal advisor for the Jackson administration, 1835-1838; appointed by President Polk as the ambassador to France, 1847-1849.-American National Biography.Milton Sayler: (4 November 1831-17 November 1892) U.S. Congressman; admitted to the bar in Cincinnati, c. 1855; served on the legislature of Ohio, 1862-1863; elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, 1873-1880; appointed as Speaker of the House pro tempore, 1876.-Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography.Theodore Sedgwick: (27 January 1811-8 December1859) Lawyer; selected as assistant to Edward Livingston, U.S. minister to France, 1833-1834; became the librarian of the Law Institution of the City of New York, 1848-1859; served as president of the Association for the Exhibition of the Industry of all Nations, 1852; a noted legal theorist, he wrote the significant work, --œTreatise on the Measure of Damages; or, An Inquiry into the Principles Which Govern the Amount of Compensation Recovered in Suits at Law,-- 1852; appointed as U.S. district attorney of the southern district of New York, 1858.-American National Biography.William Henry Seward: (16 May 1801-16 October 1872) U.S. statesman; elected to the U.S. Senate in 1849 and became an influential Republican Party leader; served as President Abraham Lincoln--s Secretary of State, 1861-1869; negotiated the purchase of the Territory of Alaska in 1867; supported President Andrew Johnson--s reconstruction policy.-The Cambridge Biographical Encyclopedia.Henry Warner Slocum: (24 September 1827-14 April 1894) Union general; graduated from the U.S. Military Academy, 1852; commissioned as second lieutenant in the First Artillery; resigned commission in 1856 to study law; admitted to the New York bar, 1858; elected as a member of the New York assembly, 1859; served as treasurer of Onondaga County, 1860; during the Civil War he rose through the ranks, finally commanding the Army of Georgia; after the war he was assigned to command the department of the Mississippi, 1865; became a Democratic presidential elector, 1868; served four terms in the U.S. Congress, 1868-1872, 1882-1885; appointed commissioner of public works in Brooklyn, 1876.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume VIII.George A[lbert] Smith: (26 June 1817-1 September 1875) First counselor to President Brigham Young, 1868-1875; ordained an apostle in the Council of the Twelve, 1839; elected member of the senate of the provisional state of Deseret, c. 1850; elected as chief justice of Iron County, Utah and as a member of the council of the legislative assembly, 1851; appointed to preside over the Mormon church in Utah county, 1852; admitted as a member of the bar of the Supreme Court of the Territory of Utah, 1855; chosen as a delegate to the U.S. Congress, 1856; colonized several settlements in southern Utah; conducted first church investigation of the Mountain Meadows Massacre; he was also appointed as Trustee-in-Trust of the church.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:37.John Smith: (16 July 1781-23 May 1854) Patriarch; joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1832; set apart as patriarch, 1844; traveled overland and settled with the Saints in Salt Lake Valley, 1847; he was made the Presiding Patriarch of the Church, 1849; gave a patriarchal blessing to Thomas L. Kane.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:182.Eliza Roxcy Snow: (21 January 1804-5 December 1887) Poetess and second president of the Relief Societies of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; as a young woman, she was recognized for her literary talents and published a poem commemorating the deaths of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams; baptized a member of the church in 1835; became the plural wife of Joseph Smith, 1842; in the Mormon exodus after the Prophet--s death, she joined the saints on the overland trail to Utah in 1847; wed to Brigham Young, 1849; called as the second General President of the Relief Society of the Church of Jesus-Christ of Latter-day Saints (a women--s service organization), 1866- 1887.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:693.Elizabeth Rebbeca Ashby Snow: (17 May 1831-12 Jun 1915) Plural wife of Erastus Snow; hosted the Kanes on their visit to St. George, Utah, 1872.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:512 and Twelve Mormon Homes Visited in Succession on a Journey Through Utah to Arizona.Erastus Snow: (9 November 1818-27 May 1888) Member of the Council of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1849-1888; met missionaries from the Mormon church and was baptized, 1832; served several missions to the Eastern states, 1834-1846; one of first Mormons to enter the Salt Lake Valley, 1847; helped organize the provisional state of Deseret, 1849; called to served a mission to Denmark, 1849-1853; ministered over colonies of the Mormon church in Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:103.Lorenzo Snow: (30 April 1814-10 October 1901) Fifth President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1898-1901; called to the Council of the Twelve Apostles, 1849, and was then called to open a mission in Italy; elected as a member of the Utah Territorial legislature, 1853-82; helped to settle various Mormon colonies in Utah, 1853-1864; called as president of the Council of the Twelve, 1889; called as President of the Church, 1898; during tenure as president, he helped to alleviate church debt.-American National Biography.William C. Staines: (26 September 1818-3 August 1881) Emigrant agent for the L.D.S. church, Indian interpreter; at the age of 23, he converted to the Mormon religion in England; came to America in 1843; lived with a group of Ponca Indians for six months in 1846 and learned their culture and language; traveled west to Utah and settled in Salt Lake City in 1847; served as the Territorial Librarian, 1851-52; helped guard the Overland Mail route from Indian attack, 1853; was one of the original founders of the Staines, Needham and Company mercantile enterprise, 1859; elected to the City Council, 1859; served a mission to England, 1859-1863; called to serve as the Church Emigration agent from 1863 until his death.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:513.Edwin McMasters Stanton: (19 December 1814-24 December 1869) U.S. Attorney General and Secretary of War; appointed as U.S. Attorney General by President Buchanan, 1860; served as legal consultant to Secretary of War Simon Cameron, 1861; after Cameron--s resignation, replaced him as secretary, 1862; in post-war years, supervised the demobilization of the army and had a significant disagreement in Reconstruction policy with President Johnson; in efforts to protect his position, Congress passed the Tenure of Office Act, 1867; Johnson demanded Stanton--s resignation in 1867, and after some protest was forced out by Johnson; Congress invoked impeachment articles in retaliation to Johnson--s actions, but after the Senate--s failure to convict Johnson, Stanton resigned in 1867; appointed by President Grant to the U.S. Supreme Court, but died before he could assume office.-American National Biography.Thomas B.H. Stenhouse: (21 February 1824-8 March 1882) Author and leader in the Mormon Church, later an apostate; born in Scotland; early convert to the Mormon church, 1845; served in the British Mission, 1848; assisted in opening the Italian Mission; toured Mormon congregations in the eastern U.S. and edited The Mormon, 1858-1859; moved with his family to Utah, 1859; served as clerk in the Church Historian's Office, reporter for the Deseret News, publisher, university regent, postmaster, and lecturer; acquaintance with Thomas L. Kane; left the Church in 1870; authored an expose of the Church which he entitled Rocky Mountain Saints, hoping to draw Mormons into the Godbeite movement.---œThe Stenhouses and the Making of a Mormon Image.--Thaddeus Stevens: (4 April 1792-11 August 1868) Lawyer, congressman, political leader; began a law practice in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1816-1826; elected to the Pennsylvania House on the Anti- Masonic ticket, 1833-1841; involved in the --œBuckshot War-- over a disputed election in Philadelphia County, 1838; served 3 terms as a U.S. Congressman on the Whig ticket, 1848-1853; became a prominent figure in the formation of the Republican party and was reelected to Congress, 1858- 1868; became chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee; was an ardent supporter of abolition and Radical Reconstruction.-American National Biography.Samuel Stokely: (25 January 1796-23 May 1861) Congressman, lawyer; graduated from Washington College in 1813; studied law; admitted to the bar; opened law practice in Steubenville, Ohio, 1817; served as a U.S. land receiver, 1827-28; elected to the Ohio Senate, 1837-1838; elected as a Whig to the U.S. House of Representatives, 1841-1843; resumed the practice of law in Steubenville.-Who Was Who in America. Historical Volume, 1607-1896 and Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1971.Margaret D. Stone: (1815-c. late 1800s?) Artist in New York City, active c.1860; requested a copy of Twelve Mormon Homes from William Wood.-Dictionary of Women Artists.Roy Stone: (16 October 1836-6 August 1905) Civil engineer and military officer; became an officer during the Civil War; in the post-war era he undertook several civil engineering projects and started the Good Roads movement; petitioned Congress to establish a Bureau of Public Roads and Office of Road Inquiry in the Department of Agriculture, 1893; served as special agent, engineer, and director in the Office of Road Inquiry, 1893-1899; wrote several works on road building, 1893-1903.-American National Biography.Charles Sumner: (6 January 1811-11 March 1874) U.S. Senator, abolitionist; influenced by significant reformers of the day, Sumner took up a crusade of pacifism and emancipation of slavery; he was chosen as the orator for Boston--s Independence Day celebration in 1845, a speech that launched him into national attention; elected to the U.S. Senate in 1851; helped form the Free-Soil party and sponsored anti-slavery legislation in the Senate; in 1856 he delivered an anti-slavery speech, --œThe Crime Against Kansas,-- and disgruntled congressman Preston Brooks from South Carolina severely bludgeoned him with a wooden club on the Senate floor; after a respite to Europe, he resumed seat in 1859; a friend to Lincoln, he was made Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations; remained a life-long crusader for black civil rights and served as a senator until his death in 1874.-American National Biography.John Taylor: (1 November 1808-25 July 1887) Third president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; joined the Mormon church in Canada, 1836; moved to the United States, eventually settling in Utah, 1847; called as a member of the Council of the Twelve Apostles, 1838; he was a missionary to England, the Isle of Man, and Ireland, 1840; was selected to represent the Church before Congress, 1841; editor of Nauvoo--s Times and Seasons; eyewitness to Joseph Smith--s murder in 1844; served a mission to France, 1849-1852; elected to the legislative council in Utah, 1852; served as president over the Eastern States Mission, 1852-1857; civically, he acted as speaker of the House of the Utah legislature and probate judge of Utah county; in 1880, he became president of the Church and lived in hiding until his death to escape prosecution from antipolygamy laws, 1884-1887.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:14.Lorenzo Thomas: (26 October 1804-2 March 1875) Soldier; became a member of the War Board with the outbreak of the Civil War; a difference of opinion with War Secretary Stanton led to his departure from Washington to head the first large scale recruitment effort of black soldiers, 1863; breveted a major general, 1865; appointed by President Johnson to replace Stanton as Secretary of War, 1867; during Johnson--s impeachment trial, the Senate indicted Thomas in several articles; after the trial, he perpetuated turmoil in the War department by refusing to his relinquish duties despite Stanton's reappointment to the secretarial post; eventually forced out by Johnson and retired from the army, 1869.-American National Biography.Osmond Rhoads Howard Thomson: (5 December 1873-23 December 1943) Librarian, began his career in the West Philadelphia branch Free Library of Philadelphia, 1899-1901; became head of the Wagner Institute branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia, 1901-1906, and later of the J.V. Brown Library, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, 1906; wrote the History of the Bucktails (with W.H. Rauch), 1906.-Who Was Who in America. Volume II, 1897-1942.Robert Toombs: (2 July 1810-15 December 1885) U.S. Senator, Confederate leader; elected to the Georgia House of Representatives, 1837 and 1841, served four terms in the U.S. House as a Whig, 1843-1853; entered the U.S. Senate as a Democrat, 1852-1861; upon the secession of the South, he joined the Confederacy; acted as a member of the Confederate Provisional Congress, Secretary of State of the Confederate States, and held the rank of brigadier general; at the end of the war, he was exiled to Cuba and London; returned in 1867; served as a delegate for the Georgia state constitutional convention, 1877.-Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-1989.Edward Wheelock Tullidge: (30 September 1829-21 May 1894) Mormon author and historian, later relinquished his membership in the Church; born in Britain; joined the Church in 1848; called from missionary work to write and edit for the Millennial Star, beginning in 1854; moved to Utah; worked in the Church Historian's Office; began to doubt the secular nature of the church; moved to the eastern U.S., 1866, and wrote about Mormonism; returned to Utah, 1868; joined in publishing the Utah Magazine; member of the Godbeite movement; voluntarily left the Church; helped start the Mormon Tribune; authored a biography of Brigham Young, The Women of Mormondom, and Life of Joseph Smith the Prophet, 1876-1878; ordained an elder in the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints in 1879; started a new periodical, Tullidge's Quarterly of Utah, in 1880; continued writing and publishing histories of Utah and the Rocky Mountain West.---œEdward Wheelock Tullidge, the Mormons-- Rebel Historian-- andWayward Saints.Washakie: (1800?-15 February 1900) Native American, Shoshone chief; rose to prominence in his tribe during the early 1840s; maintained friendly relations with western expansionists and the American government; respected Brigham Young and the Mormons for many years; succeeded in securing a treaty for a reservation in the Wind River Valley, 1868; continued to support the U.S. military, joining in fights against the Arapahos and the Sioux, and participated in the Battle of the Rosebud, 1876; in honor of his service, the U.S. government renamed Camp Brown after him; baptized by Amos Wright and other missionaries into the Mormon church with hundreds of fellow tribe members, 1880; near the end of his life, he converted to Episcopalianism and settled on the Wind River Reservation.-Dictionary of American Biography, Volume X, and --œThe Mormons and the Ghost Dance.--Frederick Edward Weatherly: (1848-1929 ) Author; graduated from Oxford in 1871; authored many children--s books.-Allibone's Critical Dictionary of English Literature: A Supplement. British and American Authors.Daniel Webster: (18 January 1782-24 October 1852) Politician and lawyer; elected to the House of Representatives from New Hampshire in 1812; served as the minority leader, 1812-1815; moved to Boston and continued practicing law, representing large companies and helped establish new jurisprudence before the Supreme Court; contributed as a delegate to the Massachusetts constitutional convention of 1820; allied with the Republican party and was elected to the House of Representatives, 1823-1827; advanced to the U.S. Senate, 1827; a close friend and supporter of Henry Clay, Webster became an ardent defender of the Bank of the U.S. during Jackson's advance in the 1830s; appointed as Secretary of State during the Harrison administration, 1840-1843; returned to the U.S. Senate in 1845; advocated compromise during the heated sectional politics of the 1850s; reappointed as Secretary of State by Millard Fillmore, 1850; attempted to secure the Whig nomination for the presidency but was defeated, 1852; died before the election.-American National Biography.Daniel H. Wells: (27 October 1814-24 March 1891) Member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; a prominent citizen of Commerce, Illinois, later known as Nauvoo, he allowed Mormon refugees to settle on his land starting in 1839, baptized a member of the Church, 1846; acted as aide-de-camp to Brigham Young during the 1848 westward migration to Utah; elected to the legislative council of the provisional state of Deseret, became the state attorney, and chosen as a major general in the Nauvoo Legion, 1849; became Brigham Young--s second counselor, 1857; served a mission to England, 1864-1865; elected as mayor of Salt Lake City, 1865-1876; appointed counselor to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, 1877.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:62.David Wilmot: (20 January 1814-16 March 1868) U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania; served in Congress, 1845-1851; elected judge of the thirteenth judicial district, 1851-1861; helped found the Republican Party and was its first candidate for governor; took over Simon Cameron--s vacated seat in the Senate, 1861-1863; appointed by Lincoln as a judge of the reorganized Court of Claims.-Dictionary of American Biography. Volume X.Warren Hugh Wilson: (1 May 1867-2 March 1937) Presbyterian clergyman and rural sociologist; studied at the Union Theological Seminary in New York and was ordained to the Presbyterian ministry, 1894; went on to Columbia University where he wrote a dissertation analyzing his former rural parish at Quaker Hill; received his doctorate, 1908; acted as secretary in the Church and Country Life Department of the Presbyterian Board of National Missions, 1908 until his death; completed an extensive study on rural sociology and taught at the Teacher's College in Columbia, 1914-1923; also lectured at the Union Theological Seminary, 1927-1937.-Dictionary of American Biography. Supplement II.William Wood: (21 October 1808-1 October 1894) Banker; son of a merchant in Scotland, immigrated to New York, 1808; returned to Europe several times; married Harriet Kane; father of Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood [Kane]; spent much of his life in the banking business; served for many years as a member of the New York Board of Education.Wilford Woodruff: (1 March 1807-2 September 1898) Fourth president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; baptized into the church, 1833; called as a member of the Council of the Twelve Apostles, 1838; mission to England, 1839-41; traveled west to the Salt Lake Valley during the Mormon Exodus, 1846-1847; excellent journal keeper; served as church historian; ardent fisherman; became president of the Deseret Agricultural and Manufacturing Society, 1862-1877; served as President of the St. George Temple, 1877; lived on the "underground" during the federal government's prosecution of polygamists, c. 1880s; called as President of the Church, 1889; issued the Manifesto of 1890, the Church's official statement announcing the end of polygamy; divided the church membership into national political parties, 1891; served as the President of the Church until his death.-American National Biography.Brigham Young: (1 June 1801-29 August 1877) Second president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; started a business in various trades; joined the Church in 1832; an active missionary and preacher; led apostolic mission to England, 1839-1841; led the Saints West to Utah in 1847; befriended by Thomas L. Kane; sustained president of the Church in 1848; appointed first governor of the newly created Territory of Utah, 1850, and ex officio superintendent of Indian Affairs; served as theological and political leader of the Mormon people in Utah until the outbreak of the Utah War, when he nominally relinquished political power to federally appointed governor, Alfred Cumming; oversaw Mormon colonizing of the Great Basin.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:8.Brigham Young, Jr.: (13 December 1836-11 April 1903) President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles; served on the Salt Lake Stake High Council, 1861; became the assistant to John M. Bernhisel, Utah--s delegate to Congress, 1862; served a mission to England and Scandinavia, 1862- 1863; called to the European mission presidency, 1864; served another mission to Europe, 1866- 1867; called as an apostle, 1868; worked with the Union Pacific Railroad; served on the territorial legislature; member of the Nauvoo Legion; called as President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, 1901.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:121.John Willard Young: (1 October 1844-12 February 1924) Son and first counselor to Brigham Young, ordained an apostle of the church, 1864; served a mission to Europe, 1866-1867; served as Brigham Young--s first counselor, 1876-1877; involved in railroad development in the West.-L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:42.Joseph A. Young: (14 October 1834-5 August 1875) Son of Brigham Young and President of the Sevier Stake of Zion; served a mission to England, 1854-1856; worked on a contract basis with the Union Pacific railroad beginning in 1868, and was responsible for the grading in Weber Canyon; also became the first superintendent of the Ogden-Salt Lake line and a promoter of the Utah Southern; called to oversee the Sevier area of the Church, 1872; served on the Utah territorial legislature for nine sessions.- L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:518.Works Cited:Adams, Oscar Fay. A Dictionary of American Authors. Fifth Edition, revised and enlarged. New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1904.Alexander, Thomas. Utah: The Right Place. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, c1996.Andrus, Hyrum and Richard E. Bennett, ed. and compilers. Mormon Manuscripts to 1846: A Guide to the Holdings of the Harold B. Lee Library. Provo, UT: Archives and Manuscripts, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, 1977.Benét's Reader's Encyclopedia. Third edition. New York: Harper &​ Row, 1987.Bennett, Richard E. Mormons at the Missouri, 1846-1852: --œand should we die--.-- Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987.Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1971. The Continental Congress (September 5, 1774 to October 21, 1788) and the Congress of the United States (from the first through the ninety-first Congress March 4,1789, to January 3, 1971, inclusive). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1971.Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-1989. The Continental Congress, September 5, 1774 to October 21, 1788 and the Congress of the United States from the First Through the One Hundredth Congresses, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1989, inclusive. Bicentennial Edition. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1989.Bitton, Davis. Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies. Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 1977.Boatner, Mark Mayo, III. The Civil War Dictionary. New York: David McKay Co., 1959.Burke, William Jeremiah. American Authors and Books, 1640 to the Present Day. 3d rev. ed. New York: Crown Publishers, 1972.Carter, Kate B., ed. Heart Throbs of the West. Salt Lake City, Utah: Daughters of Utah Pioneers, 1948._____. Our Pioneer Heritage. Vol. 3. Salt Lake City, Utah: Daughters of Utah Pioneers, 1958-1977.Coates, Lawrence G. --œThe Mormons and the Ghost Dance.-- Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 18 (Winter 1985): 89-111.Contemporary Authors. A Bio-bibliographical Guide to Current Writers in Fiction, General Nonfiction, Poetry, Journalism, Drama, Motion Pictures, Television, and Other Fields. Volume 102. Detroit: Gale Research, 1981.Crystal, David, ed. The Cambridge Biographical Encyclopedia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.Dictionary of American Biography. 20 Volumes, plus supplements. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1927-1936.Encyclopedia of American Biography. Volume 8. New York and West Palm Beach, FL: The American Historical Society, 1938.Evans, Frank. --œElder Frank Evans.-- General Conference Reports (October 1947): 101-5.Garraty, John A. and Mark C. Carnes, ed. American National Biography. 24 volumes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.Hart, Edward LeRoy. Mormon in Motion: the Life and Journals of James H. Hart, 1825-1906, in England, France, and America. [S.l.]: Windsor Books, 1978.Jenson, Andrew. Latter-Day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia. Four volumes. Salt Lake City: The Andrew Jenson History Co., 1901-1936.Johansen, Bruce E. and Donald A. Grinde, Jr. The Encyclopedia of Native American Biography. Six Hundred Life Stories of Important People, From Powhatan to Wilma Mankiller. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1997.Kane, Elizabeth Wood. Twelve Mormon Homes Visited in Succession on a Journey Through Utah to Arizona. Dallas, Texas: S. K. Taylor Publishing Co., 1973._____. --œBrief Biography of the Author, Elizabeth Dennistoun Kane.-- In: Story of John Kane. J.B. Lippincott Company, 1921.Kinnell, Susan K., ed. People in History. An Index to U.S. and Canadian Biographies in History Journals and Dissertations. Two volumes. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-Clio, 1988.Kirk, John Foster. Allibone's Critical Dictionary of English Literature: A Supplement. British and American Authors. Two volumes. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott &​ Co., 1891. Reprint. Detroit: Gale Research, 1965.Lamar, Howard. The New Encyclopedia of the American West. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1998.Lanman, Charles. Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the United States. Washington, DC: James Anglim, 1876. Reprint. Detroit: Gale Research, 1976.Ludlow, Daniel, ed. The Encyclopedia of Mormonism. New York: Macmillan, 1992.Lye, William Frank. --œEdward Wheelock Tullidge, the Mormons-- Rebel Historian.-- Utah Historical Quarterly 28 (January, 1960): 57-75.The McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of World Biography. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1973.National Cyclopaedia of American Biography. New York: James T. White &​ Company, 1909.Petteys, Chris. Dictionary of Women Artists. Boston: G.K. Hall &​ Co., 1985.Preston, Wheeler. American Biographies. New York: Harper &​ Brothers Publishers, 1940. Reprint. Detroit Gale Research, 1974.Ricketts, Norma Baldwin. The Mormon Battalion: U.S. Army of the West, 1846-1848. Logan, UT: Utah State University Press, 1996.Schindler, Harold. Orrin Porter Rockwell: Man of God, Son of Thunder. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1993.Trapp, Dan. Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography. Four volumes plus supplements. Glendale, CA: Arthur H. Clark Co., 1988.Vexler, Robert I. The Vice-Presidents and Cabinet Members. Two Volumes. Dobbs Ferry, New York: Oceana Publications, Inc., 1975.Walker, Ronald W. --œThe Stenhouses and the Making of a Mormon Image.-- Journal of Mormon History 1 (1974): 51-72._____. Wayward Saints: the Godbeites and Brigham Young. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998.Warner, Ezra J. Generals in Blue: Lives of the Union Commanders. Louisiana State University Press, 1964.Washington, Charles Lanman. Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the United States. During its First Century; From Original and Official Sources. Reprint. Detroit: Gale Research, 1976.Whitton, Mary Ormsbee. --œAt Home with Lucretia Mott.-- The American Scholar 20:2 (Spring 1951), pp. 175-184.Who Was Who in America. Twelve Volumes. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who, 1943+.Wilken, Robert L. John Chrysostom and the Jews; Rhetoric and Reality in the Late 4th Century. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1983.Wilson, James Grant and John Fiske, ed. Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography. New York: D. Appleton &​ Co., 1888-1889. Reprint. Detroit: Gale Research, 1968. Items Separated from Collection: Photographs and Published ItemsPhotographs All the photographs are described in Series XII. Photocopies of each photograph remain in the collection. The originals have been transferred to the Photoarchives.Printed Materials The following items have been removed from the collection and transferred to the Americana Collection:Hardcover Bound--œFirst Annual Report of the Board of Directors of the McKean and Elk Land and Improvement Company to the Stockholders.-- Philadelphia: E.C. &​ J. Biddle, 1857, 35 pp., 22.9 cm. [2 copies, each has a different color cover (dark blue-gray and green; inside are 3 maps and 3 charts, folder up and attached; the engineer--s report on the value of the land, etc., also includes the act incorporating the company.]The Holy Bible. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1836, about 1,000 pp., 14.9 cm. [Dark green cover, paper lace prayer card on inside front cover, written in French and Spanish, --œL--Ange Guardien,-- --œÃ‰l Angel de la Guardia,-- prayer written in French on verso, small marking in pencil also on verso; labeled on inside front cover, --œThomas Leiper Kane, from his father, at parting. 1 Jan. 1839.--; scrap of lined paper found in the middle, with note, --œ T.L. Kane--s Bible, His Father--s Gift.--]--œNarrative of Privations and Sufferings of United States Officers and Soldiers While Prisoners of War in the Hands of the Rebel Authorities.-- Philadelphia: King &​ Baird, 1864, 283 pp., 22.9 cm. [Brown leather binding, parts of the covering have been cut away; printed for the U.S. Sanitary Commission, report of the Commission of Inquiry, appointed by the U.S. Sanitary Commission, includes a medical report and several personal testimonies of U.S. soldiers.]Smith, Joseph Jr., transl. The Book of Mormon. Liverpool, England: J. Tompkins, 1841, 643 pp., 14.7 cm. [(First European) Edition of the Book of Mormon; printed by J. Tompkins, Liverpool for Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, and Parley P. Pratt; maroon, with gold cover and binding, slightly damaged, bookmark in pp. 230-231.]Smith, Joseph Jr., transl. The Book of Mormon. Liverpool, England: Orson Pratt, 1849, 563 pp., 14.5 cm.[(Second European) Edition of the Book of Mormon; damaged black cover and binding, front cover completely separated from book; edges of the pages are black, some stuck together; inside cover---Mr.-- written by Kane, and drawn picture of arm and hand holding a sword.]Woodruff, President W. Leaves From My Journal. Salt Lake City, UT: Juvenile Instructor Office, 1882, 96 pp., 18.4 cm. [Blue cover and binding, black discoloration on front cover; some of Woodruff--s experiences in the early days of the Church.]Pamphlets, Broadsides and Incomplete Printings--œArticles of Association.-- No publisher listed, 40 pp., n.d., 18.2 cm. [Paper, bound, no covering; pamphlet with general instructions for the corporation, organization, and governing of the United Order, its objects are industrial pursuits, colonization and improvement of lands, establishing and maintaining colleges, libraries, etc., includes also instructions and rules for members of the United Order, questions and answers, and extracts from letters: to Brigham Young from the Board in St. George, 2 August 1874; to the Board from the First Presidency (B. Young, George A. Smith, Daniel H. Wells), 20 August 1874.]Bertrand, Louis. --œLes Prairies.-- Jersey, 12 November 1854, 1p., 2 copies. [A poem written about a trek across the prairies; translation, May 2000, by Michelle Stockman.]--œBethel.-- A Confederate propaganda tract, 1 p., folded, printed on all sides, c. 1861. [Compares Manassas to Bunker Hill (--œthe Bunker Hill of this second war of independence . . . however, was a complete success,--) and Bethel (from Old Testament), --œThe atheistic and fanatical heresies, that have so sadly corrupted Northern society, and weakened the power of scriptural faith and piety, have not seriously demoralized Southern society,-- encouragement of Southern soldiers to repent and turn to God, --œGod has often employed a heathen enemy to chastise His own people.--]Bingham, Hon. Jno. A. --œThe Power and Duty of Congress to Provide for the Common Defense and the Suppression of the Rebellion.-- No city listed: Scammell &​ Co., 15 January 1862, 8 pp., uncut, 23.6 cm. [Paper, unbound; speech given in the House of Representatives, --œThe power and duty of Congress to provide for the common defense and the suppression of the Rebellion.--]Campbell, B.B. et al. --œAn Appeal to the Executive of Pennsylvania, An Address to Governor John F. Hartranft, Invoking the Aid of the State Against the Unlawful Acts of Corporations.-- Titusville, PA: Graham &​ Lake Printers, 1878, 24 pp., 21.6 cm. [Paperback, blue covering with black print; includes reprints of 2 contracts, one between the South Improvement Co. and the Pennsylvania Railroad Co., and one between the Petroleum Trade and the Pennsylvania Railroad Co.]Cavender, Thomas S., Sect. --œMeeting for the Relief of the Mormons.-- No publisher listed, 1 p., folded, printed only on front side, n.d., [probably 1846/​47], 24.4 cm. [Blue paper, addressed by hand on verso, --œTo the Honorable Daniel Webster U.S. Senator, Washington, D.C.,-- information on meeting presided over by John K. Kane, resolutions passed to aid the Mormons.]Creamer, Jacob. --œFarewell, Bucktail.-- Polkinborn--s Steam Printing Office, 25 January 1862, 1p., 17 copies, 24.5 cm. [Written by Jacob Creamer, Co.H, Kane Rifle Regiment, about Kane--s defeat in the election for colonel, dated from Camp Pierpoint.]Hazelton, Gerry W. --œGeorge R. Maxwell vs. George Q. Cannon--Contested Election, Territory of Utah.-- Report for the House of Representatives, no publisher listed, 15 p., 30 April 1874, 23.3 cm. [Paper, bound, no covering; report from the Committee on Elections, includes Notice of Contest, from Maxwell, letter from Maxwell to George L. Woods, Gov. of Utah, protesting election and claiming seat of delegate for himself, and answer from G.Q. Cannon, Committee concluded that Cannon is the legal delegate, includes --œViews of the Minority,-- the dissenting opinion written by Horace H. Harrison.]Hooper, William H. --œMcGorty vs. Hooper. A Statement of the Positions Relied Upon by the Sitting Delegate.-- No publisher listed, 1 p., folded, written on 4 sides, n.d., 23.9 cm. [Objections to a legal case involving a contested election.]Huntington, D.B. --œVocabulary of the Utah and Sho-Sho-Ne or Snake Dialects, with Indian Legends and Traditions. Including a Brief Account of the Life and Death of Wah-Ker, The Indian Land Pirate.-- 3rd Edition. Salt Lake City: Salt Lake Herald Office, 1872, 32 pp., 15.5 cm. [Paper, bound, no covering.]--œInstruction for Mountain Artillery Prepared by a Board of Army Officers.-- Washington: Gideon and Co., 1851, 38 pp., 18.1 cm.[Front cover missing, marbleized back cover; published for the use of the army and regarded as an appendix to the system of instruction for Field Artillery in use in the army, divided into 2 sections: School of the Piece &​ School of the Battery.]Kane, Elisha Kent, M.D., U.S.N. --œThe U.S. Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin, A Personal Narrative.-- New York: Harper &​ Brothers, 1854, uncut, introduction-p. 16, and pp. 33-48, 24.3 cm. [Paper, unbound; excerpt from introduction, --œThough I accompanied this expedition as its senior medical officer, I had no claim to be considered as its historian; but he having declined making any other than an official report, I have been invited to prepare a history of the cruise, under the form of a personal narrative.--]Kane, Elizabeth D. --œA Trip to Mexico. Short Notes in Letters to the Kane Leader.-- No publisher listed, 11-14 &​19 November 1896, 6 copies, 26 pp., 23.0 cm. [Faded light blue cover with blue printing; her letters home from Mexico, she and Evan went there as representatives of State Medical Societies to the Pan- American Congress.]Kane, Gen. Thomas L. --œAlaska and the Polar Regions.-- New York: Journeyman Printers-- Co-operative Association, 1868, 32 pp., 22.3 cm. [Paper, bound, no covering; discusses issues in the acquisition of Alaska.]Kane, Thomas L. Title page of --œInstruction for Skirmishers.-- 4 copies with printing on the back, --œEntered according to Act of Congress in the year 1863, by Thomas L. Kane, in the Clerk--s Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania,-- 7 copies with blank backs, 11 copies total.Kane, Thomas L. --œThe Mormons: A Discourse Delivered Before the Historical Society of Pennsylvania: March 26, 1850." Philadelphia: King &​ Baird, 1850, 92 pp., 23.3 cm. [Brown paperback cover with black handwriting; excerpt from an introductory paragraph, --œSince the expulsion of the Mormons, to the present date, I have been intimately conversant with the details of their history. But I shall invite your attention most particularly to an account of what happened to them during their first year in the Wilderness, because at this time more than any other, being lost to public view, they were the subjects of fable and misconception.--]May, W.A. --œThe Roberts Lot Tract, Engineer May--s Report.-- Scranton, PA, 23 December 1881, 6 pp., 21.5 cm when folded. [Report on coal mining on the Roberts lot, owned by T.L. Kane.]Mills, Edward W. --œLincoln Never Smoked a Cigarette.-- Political pamphlet of Edward W. Mills, Former Prohibition Candidate for Governor of West Virginia, n.d., 1 p., folded, 2 copies, 16.4 cm. [Poem promoting abstinence from alcohol and tobacco.]M--Kean County Democrat--Extra. With newspaper article from Thomas L. Kane, --œVolunteer Rifles. Marksmen Wanted!-- 19 April 1861, 1 p., 37.5 cm. [Paper, broadside; recruiting volunteers for the Union army.]Salt Lake Daily Tribune Reporter. --œThe Lee Trial! An Expose of the Mountain Meadows Massacre.-- Salt Lake City, UT: Tribune Publishing Company, Publishers, 1875, 64 pp., 21.4 cm. [Paperback, covered in yellow paper with a print of John D. Lee on the front cover; published as a tract by the Tribune Printing Company to satisfy the demand their Daily and Weekly issues could not meet.]Shields, Charles W. --œAddress at the Funeral of the Hon. John K. Kane.-- at Fern Rock, Philadelphia, 24 February 1858, 15 pp., 21.4 cm. [Dark blue paperback cover with gold writing, --œHon. J.K. Kane.--]Stockton, Helen Hamilton, ed. --œLetters to BK.-- Princeton, 1914, 28 pp., 21.8 cm. [Paperback, light green cover; on title page, --œ Letters of John Kintzing Kane and Jane Duval Leiper Kane,-- a series of letters between the two published by Stockton, a later descendant.]Waite, Charles B. --œArgument of Charles B. Waite, Before the Committee of Elections of the House of Reps., March 25th --27th, 1868, in the case of William M--Gorty vs. Wm. H. Hooper, Sitting Delegate From the Territory of Utah.-- No publisher listed, 25-27 March 1868, 32 pp., 23.4 cm.[Paper, bound, no cover; given before the Committee of Elections of the House of Representatives in the Case of William M--GORTY v. William H. Hooper, brings several charges against Utah and the Mormons, Utah--s government is not republican in form, so they aren--t entitled to representation, they are disloyal and hostile, they are trying to destroy monogamy, Mormons in good standing take an oath of hostility to the Federal government and to kill apostates, William Hooper was not legally elected delegate, contains statements from Parley P. Pratt, Orson Pratt, John Taylor, Heber C. Kimball, Brigham Young, George A. Smith, and Jedediah M. Grant, some penciled-in notes (by Kane?)].--œWhat is the --˜Mormon-- Security Program?-- Independence, Missouri: Press of Zion--s Printing and Publishing Company, n.d., 11 pp., 22.6 cm. [Pamphlet describing an economic program designed to help the needy escape the need for economic assistance.]BYU Holdings of Manuscripts and Archival Materials by or about the Kanes and their RelativesKane, Thomas Leiper. --œAutograph, [1846].-- Autograph on an extracted fly leaf from a book which was presented to J. C. Little on 17 February [1846]. MSS 991.Kane, John Kintzing. --œLetter, 1846.-- Handwritten and signed letter dated 1 February 1846 and addressed to "dear Sir." Kane writes that he has recently been visited by a "Mr. Benson and Mr. Little" of the Mormon Church. They asked Kane's opinion of a case relating to a Joseph Sidwell. Kane comments on the Mormon plans to emigrate to the West U.S. "I am thoroughly convinced of the general integrity and right mindedness of this persecuted sect." MSS SC 2474.Young, Brigham. --œLetter, 1873.-- Handwritten and unsigned draft of a letter, dated 6 May 1873, and addressed to Thomas Leiper Kane. Young writes to Kane with advice relating to Kane's estate. Vault MSS 144.Little, Jesse C. --œLetters Received and Pamphlets, 1844-1892.-- Letters received, miscellaneous items, and pamphlets composed by Little. These materials largely deal with Little's activities in the mission field in the 1840's. Letters are from such prominent individuals as Brigham Young (1801-1877) and Thomas L. Kane. MSS SC 1124.Allis, Samuel. --œStatement, 1846.-- Photocopies of a handwritten and signed statement dated 8 September 1846. Allis affirms that he and others were in Omaha County, Nebraska, before the Mormons arrived. Also included is a letter from R. B. Mitchell stating he has "nothing to add to my communication made to Colonel Kane" dated 19 September 1846. MSS SC 187.The printed items listed on pages 39-44 have been transferred to the Americana Collection. The location of each item can be found by consulting the library catalogue.Key to Abbreviations in the Kane CollectionA. PeopleBYBrigham YoungB.Y.Brigham YoungEDKElizabeth Dennistoun Wood KaneE.D.K.Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood KaneEDWElizabeth Dennistoun Wood [Kane]EWKElizabeth Dennistoun Wood KaneE.K.K.E. Kent KaneE.K.K.Elisha Kent KaneGQCGeorge Q. CannonH.A.K.Harriet Amelia KaneJKKJohn Kintzing KaneJ.K.K.John Kintzing KaneJ.W.John W. YoungJ.W.Y.John W. YoungRPKRobert Patterson KaneTLKThomas L. KaneWWWilliam WoodWmWWilliam WoodB. Bibliographical NotationsADAutograph DocumentADSAutograph Document SignedALAutograph LetterALSAutograph Letter SignedAMAutograph ManuscriptAmsAutograph ManuscriptAmsSAutograph Manuscript SignedDSDocument SignedLLetterLSLetter SignedTDSTypewrittten Document SignedTLTypewritten LetterTLSTypewritten Letter SignedTmsTypewritten ManuscriptGuide to the Microfilm of CollectionThis collection is open to use in accordance with the policies and procedures of the Library. Photocopying is not permitted. Readers are to use the microfilm copies of the collection. Exceptions must be approved by the Curator, Western and Mormon Americana.This register occupies reel #1 in the microfilm of the collection. Reel #2, therefore, starts with Box 1 of the collection. An index to the microfilm is located in --œCollection Organization: Table of Contents." This detailed index allows researchers to identify the reel number of a specific folder within a given box. Since this index is located within a larger table of contents, only the beginning point of each reel is noted. These notations can be found, following an ellipsis, along the right-hand side of pages within the table of contents.Kane Family Collections in other RepositoriesAmerican Philosophical Society Library, 105 South Fifth Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Large Collection of Kane Family Manuscripts organized mainly by individuals: Elisha Kent Kane (ca. 5000 items) [7 ln ft]Elisha Kent Kane (20 items on (1 microfilm reel))Francis Fisher Kane (ca. 3000 items) [4 ln ft]John Kintzing Kane (ca. 5000 items) [9 ln ft]John Kintzing Kane and Robert Patterson Kane, Legal papers [5 ln ft]Robert Patterson Kane (ca. 2000 items) [2½ ln ft]Thomas Leiper Kane (ca. 450 items) Register available.The Marriott Library, University of Utah, Salt Lake City has a photocopied collection of TLK papers from the APS.Collection of Manuscripts that deal with the Kane Family in part: George Washington Corner (ca. 25,000 items) [25 linear ft.]William Parker Foulke (ca. 3000 items)Henry Goodfellow (1 v. (26 p.); 12 maps.)Robert Hare (ca. 1200 items)Samuel George Morton (ca. 220 items [on 1 microfilm reel])George Arents Research Library for Special Collections at Syracuse University, Manuscript Collections, Bird Library, Room 600, Syracuse, New York 13244-2010. Peter Smith Papers [16.0 linear ft.]. Contains information on Elisha Kane. Finding aid available.Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, Box 1603A Yale Station, New Haven, CT 06520. Collection of Thomas L. Kane papers and correspondence, mostly relating to his relationship with the Mormons. 47 items. See listing in Mary C. Withington, compiler, A Catalogue of Manuscripts in the Collection of Western Americana found by William Robertson Col., Yale University Library. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1952), 155- 158. Also collection of letters written by Brigham Young that are addressed to or concern Thomas L. Kane.William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan, 909 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1190. Kane family papers, 1800-1866 (176 items). Family correspondence between the children of John K. Kane (1795-1858).Dartmouth College Library, Hanover, NH 03755. This repository has the Margaret Elder Dow Papers. They include her extensive research files on Elisha Kent Kane. Her death in 1962 prevented her completion of the Elisha K. Kane biography.The James Laws Collection also contains some material on members of the Kane Family.Green Library, Stanford University, Department of Special Collections, Manuscript Division, Stanford, CA 94305. Elisha Kent Kane Papers. [.25 linear ft.]Collection of Thomas L. Kane papers. (63 folders) [.5 ln ft].Register available.Many of the items were published in The Private Papers and Diary of Thomas Leiper Kane, A Friend of the Mormons, ed. Oscar Osburn Winther (San Francisco: Grabhorn Press, 1937).Microfilm of a copy of the collection in the BYU library.Hagley Museum and Library, Manuscripts and Archives Department, 298 Buck Road East, Greenville, DE 19807. Thomas Pym Cope Letterbooks, 1788-1853 [microform]. (4 reels). Contains correspondence with John Kintzing Kane.Historical Department/​Archives, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 50 East North Temple Street, Salt Lake City, UT 84150. This repository has a number of collections that contain Thomas L. Kane and Kane family materials. The most extensive is the Brigham Young Collection which has a sizable collection of correspondence between Young and Kane. The George Q. Cannon and John M. Bernhisel Collections are examples of other holdings containing Kane materials. The Historical Department also has the extensive Research Collection of Israel Frank Evans on Thomas L. Kane.Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107. Collection of Kane Family Manuscripts: Florence Bayard Kane [12.75 linear ft.]John Kintzing Kane Papers (ca. 1200 items)Collection of Manuscripts that deal with the Kane Family in part: Ferdinand Julius Dreer (contains material on Elisha Kent Kane)Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540. Shields/​Stockton family papers. Contains information on Kane Family genealogy and Elizabeth Kane Shields.Henry E. Huntington Library, 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino, CA 91108. Several Civil War era letters of Thomas L. Kane: to [Montgomery Slaughter?] 30 April 1862; to Alexander Dallas, 22 December 1861 and 5 January 1862; to President U.S. Grant, 6 January 1872; and to John Nicholson, 5 June 1879.The Huntington Library also has a microfilm copy of Kane material in Stanford University library, and a photographic copy of Kane materials loaned to them by Draxton Richards in May 1947.Illinois State Historical Library, Old State Capitol Building, Springfield, IL 62706. Thomas Hart Benton Papers and David Jewett Baker Papers both contain correspondence with Elias Kent Kane.Library of Virginia, Virginia State Library and Archives, Archives Branch, 11th Street at Capitol Square, Richmond, VA 23219. Tazewell family papers contain correspondence with Elias Kent Kane.Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215. Shillaber family papers contain information on Elisha K. Kane. The George Bancroft Papers contain correspondence with Thomas L. Kane.Medical Library, Trent Collection, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27706. Charles Frederick Beck Papers, 1819-1845. (6 items). Contains correspondence with John Kintzing Kane.Pennsylvania State University, Libraries, Special Collections Division, W342 Pattee Library, University Park, PA 16802. The Allison-Shelley manuscript collection contains correspondence of Elisha Kent Kane.William R. Perkins Library, Manuscript Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27706. Sarah W. Bunting Correspondence, 1811-1867. (15 items). Contains information on the arctic expedition of Elisha Kent Kane (2nd Grinnell Expedition, 1853-1855).Alfred Cumming Papers. (760 items). Most of the collection focuses on Cumming--s term as Governor of Utah Territory, 1857-1861. Microfilm, copies at BYU and at Historical Dept., LDS Church.John Francis Hamtramck Papers, 1757-1862. (2,630 items). Contains correspondence with Elias Kent Kane.United States Military Academy, Library and Archives, West Point, NY 10996. Autobiography by John P. Green. Acquaintance of Thomas L. Kane who included several primary documents from Kane in his work.United States National Archives, Washington, D.C. Contains the papers of various government agencies and a number of individuals with whom the Kanes interacted.Utah State Historical Society, 307 West Second South, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Gail George Holmes-- Reflection on Winter Quarters, a typescript entitled Thomas L. Kane Monuments, plus other collections that contain information on Thomas L. Kane.Kane Collection Bibliographical Notes: Guide to Published WorksJohn K. Kane: Biography Briggs, L.V. Genealogies of the Different Families Bearing the Name of Kent. Boston: Rockwell &​ Churchill Press, 1898.Chaney, Kevin R. --œJohn Kintzing Kane.-- In American National Biography. ed. Mark C. Carnes and John A. Garraty, 369-370. New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.Dexter, Franklin B. Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College. New York: H. Holt and Company, 1912.Frederick, John H. --œJohn Kintzing Kane.-- In Dictionary of American Biography, 257-258 New York : Charles Scribner's Sons, 1927-1936.Martin, J.H. Martin--s Bench and Bar of Philadelphia. Philadelphia: Rees Walsh, 1883.Simpson, Henry. The Lives of Eminent Philadelphians. Philadelphia: William Brotherhead, 1859.Obituaries Daily News, [Philadelphia] February 23, 1858.Philadelphian, February 23, 1858.Shields, Charles W. --œAddress at the Funeral of the Honorable John K. Kane, at Fern-Rock, Philadelphia, February 24, 1858.-- Philadelphia: Pamphlets in American History. n.p., 1858. Microform.Thomas Leiper Kane: Biography Zobell, Albert L., Jr. --œThomas L. Kane: Ambassador to the Mormons,-- Master--s Thesis, University of Utah, 1944; Sentinel in the East: A Biography of Thomas L. Kane. Salt Lake City, Utah: Nicholas G. Morgan, 1965. [Based on master--s thesis, but excluded the references.]Civil War Brandt, Dennis W. --œThe Bucktail Regiment.-- Potter County Historical Society Historical Bulletin 127 (January 1998): 1-4.Glover, Edwin A. Bucktailed Wildcats, A Regiment of Civil War Volunteers. New York: T. Yoseloff, 1960.Haselberger, Fritz; Haselberger, Mark. --œThe Skirmishes at New Creek and Piedmont.-- West Virginia History 27 (1966): 211-219.Imhof, John, D. --œTwo Roads to Gettysburg: Thomas Leiper Kane and the 13th Pennsylvania Reserves.-- Gettysburg 9 (July 1993): 53-60.Thomson, O.R. Howard and William H. Ranch. History of the --œBucktails--: Kane Rifle Regiment of the Pennsylvania Reserve Corps. Philadelphia : Electric Printing Co., 1906.Thomas L. Kane and the Mormons Arrington, Leonard J. --œIn Honorable Remembrance: Thomas L. Kane--s Services to the Mormons.-- Task Papers in L.D.S. History 22 (1978). Also in Brigham Young University Studies 21 (Fall 1981): 389-402.Arrington, Leonard J. and Davis Bitton. Saints Without Halos: The Human Side of Mormon History. Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 1981, pp. 31-38.Ashton, Wendell J. Theirs is the Kingdom. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 1970, pp. 167-205.Bitton, Davis. --œAmerican Philanthropy and Mormon Refugees, 1846-1849.-- Journal of Mormon History 7 (1980): 63-81.Bowen, Norman R. --œGeneral Thomas L. Kane: How He Came to Write --˜The Mormons,---- Times and Seasons 7 (December 1971): 2-5.Bowen, Norman R., and Albert L. Zobell, Jr., --œGeneral Thomas L. Kane: The Soldier.-- Ensign 11 (June 1971): 22-27._______. --œGeneral Thomas L. Kane: The Pioneer.-- Ensign 1 (October 1971): 2-5.Cannon, Donald Q., ed. --œThomas L. Kane Meets the Mormons.-- BYU Studies 18 (Fall 1977): 126-28. [TLK to George Bancroft, 11 July 1846].Carter, Kate, ed. --œColonel Thomas L. Kane and the Mormons.-- Treasures of Pioneer History 6 (1956): 69-128._______. --œFriends of the Pioneers.-- Heart Throbs of the West 2 (1940): 27-41.Crocheron, Augusta Joyce. --œReminiscence of General Kane.-- The Contributor 6 (September 1885): 475-77.Fleek, Sherman L. --œThomas L. Kane, Friend of the Saints.-- Mormon Heritage 2 (May House 1994): 36-42.Hartley, William G. --œFair-Minded Gentiles.-- The New Era 10 (September 1980): 40- 46.Holzapfel, R.N. and J.J. Cottle. --œA Visit to Nauvoo: September 1846.-- Nauvoo Journal 7 (Spring 1995): 3-12.Melville, J. Keith. --œColonel Thomas L. Kane on Mormon Politics.-- BYU Studies 12 (Autumn 1971): 123-25.--œThe Mormons and Thomas Leiper Kane.-- The Collector: A Magazine for Autograph and Historical Collectors 58 (December 1944-January 1945): 1-10. [A description of 23 letters to Kane from various Mormons.]Morgan, Nicholas G., Sr. --œThomas L. Kane: Peacemaker.-- Instructor 96 (July 1961): 246-47.Poll, Richard D. Quixotic Mediator: Thomas L. Kane and the Utah War Dello G. Dayton Memorial Lecture, Weber State College, 25 April 1984. Ogden, UT: Weber State College Press, 1984. [Poll--s papers and research notes have been donated to the Marriott Library, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.]_______. --œThomas L. Kane and the Utah War.-- Utah Historical Quarterly 61 (Spring 1993): 112-35.Sawain, Mark Metzler. --œA Sentinel for the Saints: Thomas Leiper Kane and the Mormon Migration.-- Nauvoo Journal 10 (Spring 1998): 17-27.Whittaker, David J. --œThomas Leiper Kane.-- In American National Biography, ed. John A. Garraty and Mark C. Carnes, 12:370-72. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.Winther, Oscar, Osburn. --œThomas L. Kane: Unofficial Emissary to the Mormons.-- Indiana Historical Bulletin 15 (February 1938): 83-90.Young, Richard W. --œMajor General Thomas L. Kane.-- Millennial Star 72 (February 24, 1910-March 3, 1910): 2-part series.Zobell, Albert L., Jr. --œThomas L. Kane, Ambassador to the Mormons.-- Utah Humanities Review 1 (October 1847): 320-46.Obituaries Boyle, H.G. --œA True Friend.-- Juvenile Instructor [Salt Lake City] 17 (1 March 1882): 74-75.Cannon, George Q. --œEditorial Thoughts.-- The Juvenile Instructor 19 (15 January 1884): 24-25.Cannon, John Q. --œThe Spouting Well at Kane.-- The Contributor [Salt Lake City] 2 (February 1881): 151-53.Deseret News [Salt Lake City] (2 January 1884).The Press [Philadelphia] (27 December 1883).Wells, Junius F., ed. --œGeneral Thomas L. Kane.-- The Contributor 5 (March 1884): 234- 39.Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. --œThomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel.-- Kane, PA: n.p., 197?.--œThomas L. Kane.-- [Program of events surrounding the dedication of a statue erected in memory of Thomas L. Kane at the Thomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel in Kane, Pa., June 30-July 2, 1972.] n.p.: n.p., 1972.--œThomas L. Kane Memorial Chapel: a Historical Site of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.-- [Pamphlet.] Salt Lake City, Utah: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, c1983.Published Writings of Thomas L. Kane Kane, Thomas L. Alaska and the Polar Regions. New York: Journeymen Printers' Cooperative Association, 1868. [Lecture of Kane before the American Geographical Society, New York City, 7 May 1868.]_______. Coahulia. [Read before the American Philosophical Society, January 19, 1877] Philadelphia, 1877._______. The Mormons: A Historical Discourse. Philadelphia: King &​ Baird Printers, 1850. [Address before the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 26 March 1850.]Richards, Joseph and William Willes, eds. What is Mormonism?: Compiled from the Writings of Elders Parley P. Pratt and Orson Pratt, John Taylor, Orson Spencer, Samuel Brannan, and others of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Calcutta, India: Agra Cantonments. Reprinted by J.A. Gibbons for Joseph Richards and William Willes, East India Mission, 1853, 16 pp. [Correspondence of Thomas L. Kane with Millard Fillmore included.]_______. What is Mormonism?: Compiled from the Writings of Elders Parley P. Pratt and Orson Pratt, John Taylor, Orson Spencer, Samuel Brannan, and others of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Expanded Calcutta ed. East India Mission. (4 months later). Material added, correspondence of TLK included.Winther, Oscar O., ed. The Private Papers and Diary of Thomas Leiper Kane, A Friend of the Mormons. San Francisco: Gelber-Liliental, 1937. [Printed at the Grabhorn Press, limited to 500 copies.]Elisha Kent Kane: Biographies Corner, George W. Dr. Kane of the Arctic Seas. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1972.Elder, William. Biography of Elisha Kent Kane. Philadelphia: Childs &​ Peterson, 1858.Godfrey, William C. Godfrey--s Narrative of the Last Grinnell Arctic Exploring Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin, 1853-4-5, with a Biography of Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, from the Cradle to the Grave. Philadelphia: J. T. Lloyd, 1857.Hayes, Isaac I. An Arctic Boat Journey in the Autumn of 1854. Boston: Brown, Taggard and Chase, 1860.Hyde, Alexander, A.C. Baldwin and W.L. Gage. The Frozen Zone and its Explorers: A Comprehensive Record of Voyages, Travels, Discoveries, Adventures and Whale-Fishing in the Arctic Regions for One Thousand Years. With a History of the Late Expedition in the Ill-fated Polaris. Engravings and Maps. Written and Compiled from Authentic Sources to which is Added a Sketch of Dr. Kane by Charles W. Shields. Hartford, Connecticut: Columbian Book Company, 1874.Mirsky, Jeannette. Elisha Kent Kane and the Seafaring Frontier. Boston: Little and Brown, 1954.Sonntag, August. Professor Sonntag--s Thrilling Narrative of the Grinnell Exploring Expedition to the Arctic Ocean, in the Years 1853, 1854, and 1855. Philadelphia: J.T. Lloyd and Co., 1857.Smucker, Samuel M. The Life of Dr. Elisha Kent Kane, and of Other Distinguished American Explorers. Philadelphia: J.W. Bradley, 1858.Villarejo, Oscar M. Dr. Kane--s Voyage to the Polar Lands. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1965.On his relationship with Margaret Fox Fornell, Earl Wesley. The Unhappy Medium, Spiritualism and the Life of Margaret Fox. Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press, 1964.Fox, Margaret. The Love-life of Dr. Kane: Containing the Correspondence and a History of the Acquaintance, Engagement and Secret Marriage Between Elisha K. Kane and Margaret Fox. [With facsimiles of letters and her portrait.] New York: Carleton, 1866.Walz, Jay and Audrey. The Undiscovered Country. New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1958. [A well-researched, but fictional work.]Published Writings of Elisha Kent Kane Kane, Elisha Kent. Adrift in the Arctic Ice Pack: From the History of the First U.S. Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin. New York: Outing Publishing Company, 1915. --œThe following pages comprise chapters XX to XLVI of Dr. Kane--s work --˜The U.S. Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin: a Personal Narrative, (London and New York, 1854)-- omitting nothing but some scientific observations. Introd.--_______. Arctic Explorations: The Second Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin, 1853, --54, --55. 2 volumes. Philadelphia: Childs &​ Peterson, 1856.________. The U.S. Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin: A Personal Narrative. New York: Harper &​ Brothers, 1853.Obituaries Shields, Charles W. --œFuneral Eulogy at the Obsequies of Dr. E.K. Kane: Delivered in the Second Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia.-- Philadelphia: Selected Americana from Sabin--s Dictionary of Books Relating to America, Parry and McMillan, 1857. Microform.Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood Kane (1836-1909): Published Writings of Elizabeth Dennistoun Wood Kane: Kane, Elizabeth Wood. A Gentile Account of Life in Utah--s Dixie, 1872-73: Elizabeth Kane--s St. George Journal. Salt Lake City: Tanner Trust Fund, University of Utah Library, 1995. [Preface and notes by Norman Bowan; profile of Elizabeth Kane by Mary Karen Bowan Solomon.]_______. Twelve Mormon Homes Visited in Succession on a Journey Through Utah to Arizona. ed. Everett L. Cooley. Salt Lake City: Tanner Trust Fund, University of Utah Press, 1974._______. Twelve Mormon Homes Visited in Succession on a Journey Through Utah to Arizona. Philadelphia, 1874. Reprinted Dallas, Texas: S.K. Taylor Printing Co., 1973.Article Solomon, Mary Karen Bowen and Donna Jenkins Bowen. --œElizabeth Dennistoun Kane: --˜Publicans, Sinners and Mormons--,-- in Woman in the Covenant of Grace, eds. Dawn Hall Anderton and Susette Fletcher Green, 212-30. Salt Lake City, UT: Deseret Book, 1994.William Wood: Kane, Elizabeth Wood, ed. Autobiography of William Wood. 2 vols. New York: J.S. Babcock, 1895. [Last part of vol.2 by Elizabeth W. Kane.]Note:A brief genealogical guide to the Thomas L. and Elizabeth W. Kane Family is available in hard-copy in L. Tom Perry Special Collections of the Harold B. Lee Library at Brigham Young University.
  • Vault MSS 792
Terms of Use
  • This collection is open to use in accordance with the policies and procedures of the Library. Photocopying is not permitted. Readers are to use the microfilm copies of the collection. Exceptions must be approved by the Curator, Western and Mormon Americana. Brigham Young University Library is the sole owner of the Thomas L. Kane and Elizabeth W. Kane Collection. The Library holds physical and literary and intellectual rights to this collection. No publication of any document is permitted without written permission of the Board of Curators, L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library.Permission to publish material from the Thomas L. Kane and Elizabeth W. Kane Collection must be obtained from the Supervisor of Reference Services and/​or the L. Tom Perry Special Collections Board of Curators.
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment