English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Parametric and Non-Parametric Tests for Economies-of-Scale in Nonpoint Pollution Control: The Case of Bear River Basin, Utah Arthur J. Caplan; John Gilbert; Devalina Chatterjee

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/40579
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Parametric and Non-Parametric Tests for Economies-of-Scale in Nonpoint Pollution Control: The Case of Bear River Basin, Utah
Author
  • Arthur J. Caplan
  • John Gilbert
  • Devalina Chatterjee
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • This paper provides examples of both parametric and non-parametric tests for economies of scale in the control of non-point pollution. Because field-level control costs and control effectiveness are uncertain from the regulator's perspective (due to the existence of asymmetric information), we test for economies of scale in the correlations between control costs per unit abated (i.e., average control cost), on the one hand, and field size, estimated delivered phosphorous (TP) load per field, and estimated delivered TP load per acre, respectively, on the other. Our dataset consists of loading and delivery ratio estimates for over 12,000 fields owned by 5,900 farmers located in the Bear River Basin, Utah. The estimates - derived from a newly developed hydrologic model of the basin - are then combined with control cost and best management practice (BMP) effectiveness estimates to create a basin-wide profile. We find statistical evidence of a negative relationship between average control cost and both delivered TP load per field and per acre, i.e., larger TP loads per field and per acre are associated with lower average control costs. This suggests that ranking fields according to delivered TP loads per field and per acre are, all else equal, consistent with prioritizing BMP subsidies in a cost effective manner. Evidence is mixed regarding the statistical relationship between average control cost and field size, which is the traditional way in which economies of scale are assessed. Implications of our findings for the management of BMP subsidy programs such as the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) are discussed.
  • economies-of-scale; non-point pollution; delivered load; control costs
  • RePEc:usu:wpaper:2009-01
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment