English, Article edition: Financial Market Globalization: Present and Future Okina, Kunio; Shirakawa, Masaaki; Shiratsuka, Shigenori

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/35547
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Financial Market Globalization: Present and Future
Author
  • Okina, Kunio
  • Shirakawa, Masaaki
  • Shiratsuka, Shigenori
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • It is widely recognized that financial market globalization has been developing. International financial markets have expanded substantially, and transaction volumes in foreign exchange markets and capital markets have increased markedly. Progress in information and telecommunications technologies, liberalization in capital markets, and development of new financial instruments have further stimulated international capital flows, leading to more expansion and efficiency in international financial markets. However, empirical evidence suggests that national borders have been serving as some sort of barriers to international capital flows. Portfolios of investors based in industrialized countries are biased toward domestic assets (the "home bias puzzle"), and national savings tend to be absorbed domestically (the "Feldstein-Horioka paradox"). From a long-term historical perspective, the size of net capital flows has not increased so much. Alternatively, such development of globalization can be viewed differently once we take account of other aspects such as off-balance sheet transactions. Derivative instruments offer the possibility of unbundling risks inherent in underlying assets, and such unbundled risks can be repackaged and dealt in separately. Thus, cross-border derivatives transactions enhance the effectiveness of risk transfer. Given the recent growing trend toward financial globalization, how and at what pace financial globalization will develop in the future have important implications for the conduct of monetary policy by central banks. If financial markets become further integrated and international capital flows more actively, it is obvious that independent monetary policy directed toward domestic goals, liberalization of capital mobility, and fixed foreign exchange rates cannot be achieved simultaneously. In addition, prudential policy might face new problems pertaining to the stability of the financial system due to increasing international linkage
  • RePEc:ime:imemes:v:17:y:1999:i:3:p:1-40
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment