English, Article edition: Bankruptcy studies and ad hoc variable selection: a canonical correlation analysis Marc J. LeClere

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/31589
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Bankruptcy studies and ad hoc variable selection: a canonical correlation analysis
Author
  • Marc J. LeClere
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Purpose – To determine the relationship among covariates used in financial distress studies. Design/​methodology/​approach – The study selects four specific bankruptcy studies and employs canonical correlation analysis to determine the relationship among the different variable sets that these studies used as predictors of financial distress. Canonical correlation analysis identifies the relationship and provides an indication of the amount of redundancy that exists between two variable sets. The four studies are representative of the genre, similar as to choice of statistical technique, and frequently cited by researchers. Findings – The research findings indicate that the relationships between the alternative variable sets are very weak and alternative variable sets do not represent similar financial relationships. Redundancy coefficients suggest that, if one variable set is redundant to another variable set, it is because the redundant variable set, is much smaller than the predictor variable set. Research limitations/​implications – The results suggest that there is not much similarity among the variable sets used in financial distress studies; to the extent that there is any similarity, it is due to variables common to each set or one variable set being larger than the other variable set. Ad hoc variable selection in financial distress studies results in the use of alternative variable sets containing heterogeneous variables unrelated to one another. Originality/​value – A common criticism of financial distress research is that a theory of corporate failure does not exist. Variable selection is not prompted by economic theory but is based upon suggestions in the literature, the success of variables in earlier studies, or the selection of a large set of variables with an accompanying data reduction procedure. Despite nearly 30 years of research in the area, the absence of an inter-correlational structure among alternative variable sets highlights the atheoretical nature of financial distress research.
  • Bankruptcy, Financial management, Variance
  • RePEc:eme:rafpps:v:5:y:2006:i:4:p:410-422
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment