1993, English, Book edition: A preliminary survey of the bats of the Deerlodge National Forest Montana 1991 by Thomas W. Butts for the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, Deerlodge National Forest. [electronic resource] Thomas W. Butts

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/3309203
Physical Description
  • 35 leaves :
Published
  • Helena, Mont Montana Natural Heritage Program 1993
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • A preliminary survey of the bats of the Deerlodge National Forest Montana 1991 by Thomas W. Butts for the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, Deerlodge National Forest.
Also Titled
  • Bats of the Deerlodge National Forest
Author
  • Thomas W. Butts
Other Authors
  • Montana Natural Heritage Program.
  • Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest (Agency : U.S.)
Published
  • Helena, Mont Montana Natural Heritage Program 1993
Medium
  • [electronic resource]
Physical Description
  • 35 leaves :
Subjects
Summary
  • Six species of bats, representing four genera, were documented by capture during this phase of the study. These were the Big brown bat, (Eptesicus fuscus), the Little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), the Yuma bat (Myotis yumanensis), the Long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis), the Hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and the Silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Relative bat densities varied between habitats. Those with rock-outcrops, beaver ponds, mature hardwoods, mature Douglas fir, or riparian areas nearby had the greatest bat activity. Findley (1993) stated that an increase in species richness accompanies increased availability of roosts. "Forested regions lacking cliffs, caverns, and caves support fewer species, and those that do occur are known to use trees as daytime roosts in summer. Mountains, broken topography with opportunities for roosting in crevices, cliff faces, caverns, and caves support richer communities" (Findley, 1993). Management prescriptions that maintain undisturbed stand of old-growth forest, especially stands of Douglas fir and mature hardwoods, the maintenance of healthy riparian area, and the preservation of caves and access to abandoned mine adits will provide roosting and foraging habitat for a diversity and abundance of bats. Management activities that promote large lodgepole pine stands, and even-aged management will not.
Language
  • English
Contributed by
Open Library

Get this edition

None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

Found at these bookshops

Searching - please wait...

You also may like to try some of these bookshops, which may or may not sell this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment