2009-07-01, English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Beyond waist-hip ratio: experimental multivariate evidence that average women's torsos are most attractive Donohoe, Misha L.; von Hippel, William; Brooks, Robert C.

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/49501870
Physical Description
  • journal article
Published
  • Oxford University Press, 2009-07-01
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Beyond waist-hip ratio: experimental multivariate evidence that average women's torsos are most attractive
Author
  • Donohoe, Misha L.
  • von Hippel, William
  • Brooks, Robert C.
Other Contributors
  • Iain Couzin
  • Rob Brooks
  • Dr. Mark Elgar
Published
  • Oxford University Press, 2009-07-01
Physical Description
  • journal article
Subjects
Summary
  • One of the most iconic findings in human behavioral ecology is the fact that women with waist-hip ratios (WHRs) of approximately 0.7 are most attractive and that this ratio indicates maximum fecundity and reproductive value. However, the effects of WHR and of other indices of body shape and size on attractiveness are far from fully resolved. We adopt a recently developed method that combines multivariate manipulation of experimental stimuli with evolutionary selection analysis to test the linear and nonlinear effects of waist, hip, and shoulder width and the interactions between these traits on the attractiveness of 200 line-drawn models to 100 men. There was no general support that WHR or body mass (expressed as perimeter–area ratio) significantly influences attractiveness. There was, however, strong preference for average values of all 3 traits indicating that attractiveness is due to the tight integration of these 3 traits. We plot the mean waist and hip sizes of 8 samples of women on our response surface, including Playboy centerfolds, models from the 1920s and 1990s, Australian escorts, and Australian women in 4 different age categories (collectively we refer to this latter group as the "regular women"). The regular women in the 25- to 44-year age-group were closest to the peak attractiveness value on our response surface. Our results highlight the strong integration of and interrelationships among different parts of the body as determinants of attractiveness.
Language
  • English
Related Resource
Identifier
  • oai:espace.library.uq.edu.au:UQ:180371

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • QLD (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment