English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Can Structural Small Open Economy Models Account for the Influence of Foreign Disturbances? Alejandro Justiniano; Bruce Preston

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/30429
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Can Structural Small Open Economy Models Account for the Influence of Foreign Disturbances?
Author
  • Alejandro Justiniano
  • Bruce Preston
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • This paper demonstrates that an estimated, structural, small open economy model of the Canadian economy cannot account for the substantial influence of foreign-sourced disturbances identified in numerous reduced-form studies. The benchmark model assumes uncorrelated shocks across countries and implies that U.S. shocks account for less than 3 percent of the variability observed in several Canadian series, at all forecast horizons. Accordingly, model-implied cross-correlation functions between Canada and U.S. are essentially zero. Both findings are at odds with the data. A specification that assumes correlated cross-country shocks partially resolves this discrepancy, but still falls well short of matching reduced-form evidence.
  • RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14547
  • This paper evaluates whether an estimated, structural, small open economy model of the Canadian economy can account for the substantial influence of foreign-sourced disturbances indentified in numerous reduced-form studies. The analysis shows that the benchmark model - and a number of variants which include a range of market imperfections - imply cross-equation restrictions and therefore capture certain properties of the data - for instance, the volatility and persistence of the real exchange rate - and yield plausible parameter estimates, this success is qualified by the model's inability to account for the transmission of foreign disturbances to the domestic economy: less than one percent of the variance of output is explained by foreign shocks.
  • RePEc:acb:camaaa:2006-12
  • This paper evaluates whether an estimated, structural, small open economy model of the Canadian economy can account for the substantial influence of foreign-sourced disturbances identified in numerous reduced-form studies. The analysis shows that the benchmark model --- and a number of variants which include a range of market imperfections --- imply cross-equation restrictions that are too stringent when confronted with the data, yielding implausible parameter estimates. While appropriate choice of ad hoc disturbances can relax these cross-equation restrictions and therefore capture certain properties of the data --- for instance, the volatility and persistence of the real exchange rate --- and yield plausible parameter estimates, this success is qualified by the model's inability to account for the transmission of foreign disturbances to the domestic economy: less than one percent of the variance of output is explained by foreign shocks
  • Open Economy, Transmission, Business Cycles
  • RePEc:red:sed006:479
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment