English, Article edition: Economics of access in a developing country: an analysis of firm-conduct in financial services Charles Okeahalam

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/29394
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Economics of access in a developing country: an analysis of firm-conduct in financial services
Author
  • Charles Okeahalam
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of industrial concentration on the level of access to financial services in a developing country context. In most studies, price is the only variable that is used to assess conduct. In this paper, we extend the standard approach by assessing the impact of concentration on the level of access to retail financial services in South Africa. Design/​methodology/​approach – Two regression models have been specified and tested. Findings – It is found – as with most of the literature – that concentration has an impact on the conduct of retail financial services firms. Specifically, the study illustrates that the pricing of retail banking products in South Africa fits with the structure-performance hypothesis and secondly, the level of access to services is inadequate, does not meet the needs of consumers and is a symptom of market power and the absence of a competitive market in retail banking. Practical implications – The findings imply that there is a need for greater regulatory focus on the enhancement of social welfare in the retail banking sector in South Africa. There is also a need to develop policy and increase provision of basic infrastructure, in particular, electricity so as to reduce the cost of distribution, supply and intermediation of retail bank products. Originality/​value – The key contribution of this paper is that it delineates conduct into two parts. It separately illustrates that concentration in the financial services sector can adversely affect social welfare in two ways. First, as is well known, it increases prices second, it reduces the level of supply and access provided to points of need. This is believed to be the first study to explicitly do this in a developing country context.
  • Banking, Developing countries, Financial services, Social values, South Africa
  • RePEc:eme:ijsepp:v:34:y:2007:i:12:p:923-942
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment