English, Article edition: Valuing human organs: an application of contingent valuation Alper Altinanahtar; John R. Crooker; Jamie B. Kruse

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/29378
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Valuing human organs: an application of contingent valuation
Author
  • Alper Altinanahtar
  • John R. Crooker
  • Jamie B. Kruse
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Purpose – This paper aims to estimate a supply response to monetary incentives to donate organs using a survey based on Adams, Barnett and Kaserman. Design/​methodology/​approach – The paper uses bootstrap techniques to estimate the characteristics of individuals and their willingness to accept monetary compensation for an organ donation commitment. It uses the estimates to fuel a simulation that examines the relationship between a market-clearing price and the usability rate. The usability rate is the proportion of deaths that result in tissues that are viable for transplant. Findings – By analyzing the relationship between usability rate and market-clearing price, the paper identifies three important ranges. When the usability rate is about 5 percent, a donation-only system (zero price) should clear the market. At a usability rate between 2 and 5 percent, modest monetary incentives can attract a supply response that will clear the market. When the usability rate is less than 2 percent, supply becomes sufficiently inelastic so that even large monetary incentives will not solve the shortage problem. Practical implications – If the market mechanism were capable of yielding a greater number of organs for transplantation than the current system, then its adoption would save numerous lives and significantly reduce the cost of treating a variety of serious diseases. Also, it is useful in a benefit-cost analysis framework designed to measure the social value of refinements in the coordination system. Originality/​value – By relating the market-clearing price of organs to their usability rates, this paper draws attention on the importance of interdisciplinary studies.
  • Body systems and organs, Sales incentives, Transplant surgery
  • RePEc:eme:ijsepp:v:35:y:2008:i:1:p:5-14
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment