Can migration reduce educational attainment? : evidence from Mexico / David McKenzi and Hillel Rapoport McKenzie, David; Rapoport, Hillel

User activity

Share to:
View the summary of this work
Authors
McKenzie, David ; Rapoport, Hillel
Appears In
Journal of Population Economics
Subjects
Emigrant remittances - Mexico.; Mexico - Economic conditions.; Sociology and social work
Audience
Academic
Summary
The authors examine the impact of migration on educational attainment in rural Mexico. Using historical migration rates by state to instrument for current migration, they find evidence of a significant negative effect of migration on schooling attendance and attainment of 12 to 18 year-old boys and 16 to 18 year-old girls. IV-Censored Ordered Probit results show that living in a migrant household lowers the chances of boys completing junior high school and of boys and girls completing high school. The negative effect of migration on schooling is somewhat mitigated for younger girls with low educated mothers, which is consistent with remittances relaxing credit constraints on education investment for the very poor. However, for the majority of rural Mexican children, family migration depresses educational attainment. Comparison of the marginal effects of migration on school attendance and on participation in other activities shows that the observed decrease in schooling of 16 to 18 year-olds is accounted for by the current migration of boys and increased housework for girls.
Bookmark
http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/255812
Work ID
255812

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this work

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this work

Add a comment


Show comments and reviews from Amazon users