2014, English, Thesis edition: Hidden in Plain View: Nineteenth‐century Aboriginal people and places in coastal Sydney Irish, Paul, Humanities, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/244972207
Physical Description
  • Thesis
  • PhD Doctorate
Published
  • University of New South Wales. Humanities, 2014
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Hidden in Plain View: Nineteenth&​#8208;century Aboriginal people and places in coastal Sydney
Author
  • Irish, Paul, Humanities, Faculty of Arts &​ Social Sciences, UNSW
Other Contributors
  • Karskens, Grace, Humanities, Faculty of Arts &​ Social Sciences, UNSW
Published
  • University of New South Wales. Humanities, 2014
Physical Description
  • Thesis
  • PhD Doctorate
Subjects
Summary
  • Until recently it was widely believed that Aboriginal people had disappeared from the coastal part of Sydney by the mid-nineteenth century. At the time, descendants of the survivors of initial colonial impacts were not thought to be 'authentic' Aboriginal people, and their links to coastal Sydney were not acknowledged. Like most settler colonial cities, they were written out of history. Their stories became hidden in plain view, fostering a pervasive perception that Aboriginal people were incompatible with city space and urban life. By recovering and piecing together a wide range of written and physical evidence though, this thesis has revealed the ongoing presence of fifty to one hundred Aboriginal people in nineteenth-century coastal Sydney. This thesis tracks patterns of movement and settlement to examine how these people responded to the growth of settler Sydney. They were linked to Sydney through ancestry or marriage, but because they also moved within a broader area of affiliation up and down the coast, they have often been seen as migrants rather than locals. The fact that European use of coastal Sydney away from the city centre was sparse left Aboriginal people the space to set up camp near valued fishing grounds. They also strategically engaged with the city, forming relationships with a number of locally born Europeans. Between the 1840s and late 1870s the government showed no interest in local Aboriginal affairs, and Aboriginal people drew on their cross-cultural relationships to negotiate continued access to an increasingly suburban landscape. When an Aboriginal protectorate was established across New South Wales in 1881, this entangled existence slowly unravelled. By the turn of the century most Aboriginal people in coastal Sydney had come to live at the segregated settlement at La Perouse, setting the pattern for the next century. Some historians currently argue that settler colonies always seek to evict Aboriginal people, but a detailed consideration of Sydney's colonial history demonstrates that entanglement and eviction are more dependent on local factors than overarching ideologies. Messy, complex stories of cross-cultural interaction only emerge by drawing together a diverse range of documents, images, artefacts and maps, with an eye to the importance of location. Acknowledging these traces in libraries, museums and the urban landscape also helps bring the story of Aboriginal Sydney back into plain view, where it belongs.
Terms of Use
Language
  • English
Related Resource
  • Thesis restricted until April 2017.
Identifier
  • oai:unsworks.unsw.edu.au:1959.4/​54313

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • NSW (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment