2004, English, Article edition: Metabolic remodelling of the failing heart: the cardiac burn-out syndrome? van Bilsen, Marc; Smeets, Pascal J.H; Gilde, Andries J; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/210736
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2004-02-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Metabolic remodelling of the failing heart: the cardiac burn-out syndrome?
Author
  • van Bilsen, Marc
  • Smeets, Pascal J.H
  • Gilde, Andries J
  • van der Vusse, Ger J
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2004-02-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • It has been postulated that the failing heart suffers from chronic energy starvation, and that derangements in cardiac energy conversion are accessory to the progressive nature of this disease. The molecular mechanisms driving this ‘metabolic remodelling’ process and their significance for the development of cardiac failure are still open to discussion. Next to changes in mitochondrial function, the hypertrophied heart is characterized by a marked shift in substrate preference away from fatty acids towards glucose. It has been argued that the decline in fatty acid oxidation is not fully compensated for by a rise in glucose oxidation, thereby imposing an additional burden on overall ATP generating capacity. Several lines of evidence suggest that these metabolic adaptations are brought about, at least in part, by alterations in the rate of transcription of genes encoding for proteins involved in substrate transport and metabolism. Here, the principal metabolic changes are reviewed and the various molecular mechanisms that are likely to play a role are discussed. In addition, the potential significance of these changes for the aetiology of heart failure is evaluated.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 2004, European Society of Cardiology
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment