2003, English, Article edition: Serum Selenium Levels in Relation to Markers of Neoplastic Progression Among Persons With Barrett’s Esophagus Rudolph, Rebecca E.; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Kristal, Alan R.; ...

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/209835
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2003-05-21 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Serum Selenium Levels in Relation to Markers of Neoplastic Progression Among Persons With Barrett’s Esophagus
Author
  • Rudolph, Rebecca E.
  • Vaughan, Thomas L.
  • Kristal, Alan R.
  • Blount, Patricia L.
  • Levine, Douglas S.
  • Galipeau, Patricia C.
  • Prevo, Laura J.
  • Sanchez, Carissa A.
  • Rabinovitch, Peter S.
  • Reid, Brian J.
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2003-05-21 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • Background: Persons with Barrett’s esophagus have a substantially greater risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma than the general population. Higher serum selenium levels have been associated with a reduced risk of several cancers; however, their association with the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma is unknown. We used a cross-sectional study to investigate the relationship between serum selenium levels and markers of neoplastic progression among persons with Barrett’s esophagus. Methods: Medical history, blood, and esophageal tissue specimens were collected from 399 members of a cohort study of Barrett’s esophagus patients undergoing endoscopic surveillance. Serum selenium levels were measured by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. DNA content of tissue samples was measured by flow cytometry. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 9p and 17p, chromosomal regions which include the p16 and p53 tumor suppressors, respectively, was detected by automated fluorescent genotyping. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Persons with serum selenium levels in the upper three quartiles (i.e., >1.5 μ M ) were less likely to have high-grade dysplasia (OR =​ 0.5, 95% CI =​ 0.3 to 0.9) or aneuploidy (OR =​ 0.4, 95% CI =​ 0.2 to 0.8) than those with levels in the lowest quartile. Serum selenium levels in the upper three quartiles were associated with similar reductions in risk of 17p (p53) LOH (OR =​ 0.5, 95% CI =​ 0.2 to 0.9) and increased 4N fraction (OR =​ 0.6, 95% CI =​ 0.3 to 1.2). By contrast, serum selenium levels were not associated with 9p (p16) LOH (OR =​ 1.0, 95% CI =​ 0.5 to 1.7), a marker that appears early in neoplastic progression. Conclusion: Our preliminary results, from a cross-sectional analysis with biologic markers, suggest that higher serum selenium levels may be associated with a reduced risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma among persons with Barrett’s esophagus. Because serum selenium was not associated with 9p (p16) LOH, we speculate that selenium may act primarily at later stages of progression toward adenocarcinoma.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 2003, The Oxford University Press
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment