1996, English, Article edition: Inferring the inferred BENNETT, G.; PLATTS, G.; CROSSLEY, J.

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/209568
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1996-10-01 00:00:00.0
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Inferring the inferred
Author
  • BENNETT, G.
  • PLATTS, G.
  • CROSSLEY, J.
Published
  • Oxford University Press
  • 1996-10-01 00:00:00.0
Physical Description
  • text/​html
Subjects
Notes
  • Reject inference has an established role in the development of scorecards for credit applications. The performance of the rejects, had they been accepted, is inferred to be good or bad in order to obtain a complete picture of the population applying for credit. Once this is done, the scorecard to assess this population can then be developed. But consider the following problem. A company mails its customer base with an offer of additional finance facilities. The problem is: who should it mail to maximize response while minimizing risk, while also minimizing the number of responders who are rejected at application time to avoid jeopardizing the existing customer relationship&​quest; This problem has three inferences required to tackle it completely. First there is the classic inference at the point of application to infer which rejects, had they been accepted, would have been good (or bad). Second, there is the inference at the point of mailing to infer which customers, had they been previously mailed, would have responded—a response inference. But third, and most interesting, is the double inference of inferring which of the inferred responders would have subsequently been good, bad, or rejected—an inference on an inference&​excl;. This paper discusses the problem and the solution adopted, and gives figures from the analysis (rescaled to protect commercial confidentiality). Marks &​ Spencer Financial Services cover some of the issues regarding implementation of the Scorex solution within Fair Isaac's Triad, utilizing both CCN and Equifax bureau data – a unique combination of multiple suppliers' products. Further, the results of a mailing campaign are analysed and compared with the predictions.
Terms of Use
  • Copyright (C) 1996, Institute of Mathematics and its Applications
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

With access conditions

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment